Skip to main content


(Written by an American expat living in the European Union)

Why are there 59 million Americans who don't have health insurance; 132 million who don't have dental insurance; 60 million who don't have any paid sick leave; 40 million who are on food stamps?

This diary attempts to look at why the American social safety net is so weak and the European social safety net is so strong. In a posture where everyone in the European Union has some type of medical and dental plan, paid sick leave, and no one in Europe is ever humiliated by the use of food stamps. As a business librarian with graduate degrees in both of those areas I am periodically asked to write reviews. This review will look at European media sources unavailable in the US which declares an end to American exceptionalism and therein the death of the American working class dream.

America's rich, corporations and individuals have decided that the solution to all future problems in America will be solved by austerity measures, rather than higher taxes on corporations and the wealthy. They have socialized risk and privatized profits! So it is that this diary by way of a European media seeks to chronicle the betrayal of the working class American dream by America’s power brokers and plutocracy from the perspective of European media sources.

Guardian.co.uk - The myth of 'American exceptionalism' implodes
One aspect of "American exceptionalism" was always economic. US workers, so the story went, enjoyed a rising level of real wages that afforded their families a rising standard of living. Ever harder work paid off in rising consumption. The rich got richer faster than the middle and poor, but almost no one got poorer. Nearly all citizens felt "middle class". A profitable US capitalism kept running ahead of labour supply. So, it kept raising wages to attract waves of immigration and to retain employees, across the 19th century until the 1970s.

The Guardian accurately identifies a salient aspect of American exceptionalism as being market economics up to the period of the 1970’s, wherein though the rich accumulated assets faster than everyone else, essentially most people didn’t feel poor as the working class during that era was allowed to fully participate in the wealth that they themselves created by receiving a higher standard of living and consumption made possible through a rise in real wages. The American economy of that era essentially ran ahead of the available labor supply right up to the 1970’s offering ever higher wages therein attracting new waves of immigrants, while concurrently through higher salaries worked to retain valued employees. Then suddenly there was what we in business jargon call a complete paradigm shift. There was a deskilling in the American labor force that had taken place, which is essentially described in Jeremy Rifkin’s - The End of Work, where millions lost their jobs to technology based innovation and computers.

Through the advent of technology, after all automated systems don’t need the lights on. They don’t need the heat on. They don’t strike. They don’t need maternity leave. This was the death nail of rising wages and benefits for the American working class, as there was no longer a labor shortage. So it is that during the last 3 decades the American working class started its decline. For a while people then turned to credit to bridge the gap, but with the market crash of ’08 this now seems to be gone. It is almost as if American plutocrats were channeling Marie Antoinette saying let them eat credit!

It was about this time that the previous inequitable distribution of wealth prior to the 1970’s took a rather precipitous turn, and suddenly the rich by every conceivable measure became much richer. Perhaps if Tocqueville were alive today he would say it was the day they ripped the guts out of American exceptionalism, because on that day the American dream died.  

Since the 1970s, most US workers postponed facing up to what capitalism had come to mean for them. They sent more family members to do more hours of paid labour, and they borrowed huge amounts. By exhausting themselves, stressing family life to the breaking point in many households, and by taking on unsustainable levels of debt, the US working class delayed the end of American exceptionalism – until the global crisis hit in 2007. By then, their buying power could no longer grow: rising unemployment kept wages flat, no more hours of work, nor more borrowing, were possible. Reckoning time had arrived. A US capitalism built on expanding mass consumption lost its foundation.

The richest 10-15% – those cashing in on employers' good fortune from no longer-rising wages – helped bring on the crisis by speculating wildly and unsuccessfully in all sorts of new financial instruments (asset-backed securities, credit default swaps, etc). The richest also contributed to the crisis by using their money to shift US politics to the right, rendering government regulation and oversight inadequate to anticipate or moderate the crisis or even to react properly once it hit.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/...

Indeed, the rich have so far been able to use the crisis to widen still further the gulf separating themselves from the rest, to finally bury American exceptionalism. First, they utilised both parties' dependence on their financial support to make sure there would be no mass federal hiring programme for the unemployed (as FDR used between 1934 and 1940). The absence of such a programme guaranteed that real wages would not rise and, with job benefits, would likely fall – as they indeed have done. Second, the rich made sure that the prime focus of government response to the crisis would benefit banks, large corporations and the stock markets. These have more or less "recovered".

Third, the current drive for government budget austerity – especially focused on the 50 states and the thousands of municipalities – forces the mass of people to pick up the costs for the government's unjustly imbalanced response to the crisis. The trillions spent to save the banks and selected other corporations (AIG, GM, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, etc) were mostly borrowed because the government dared not tax the corporations and the richest citizens to raise the needed rescue funds. Indeed, a good part of what the government borrowed came precisely from those funds left in the hands of corporations and the rich, because they had not been taxed to overcome the crisis.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/...

The real death nail of American exceptionalism came when plutocracy through corporate America made it impossible for govt to ensure that they would ever be asked to pay their fair share of taxes again. This meant that tightening budgets would become a mainstay of life for the American working class through federal and state programs, which were designed to help working class people. Therefore when the crisis of ’08 hit, part of the solution was never to do the right thing, in terms of raising the taxes on the rich and on Wall Street, who in fact were the very people responsible for the crisis in the first place. Instead the American taxpayer that is to say, working class people were forced to bailout Wall Street, in a system that had privatized profits and socialized risk.

Massive intervention was taken by American plutocrats to ensure that there would be no government bailout for the American working class through a system like the CCC which was introduced by President Roosevelt, wherein the federal government created jobs for working people on various types of public work’s projects. This not only would have stabilized the American working class, but it also would have stabilized working class wages in America by creating a labor pool, wherein corporate America in order to compete with the public sector would have to pay higher wages, and benefits to American working class families. Therein stabilizing the American dream for generations and taking an important step in initiating a European style social safety net for the American working class.

-------------------------------------------

It is a well known tried and true tactic of the plutocracy that historically they have been able to turn one half of the working class against the other half of the working class by hiring barkers to infuse paranoia in the public discourse, so that the working class winds up fighting each other. To which this diary asks, is Sarah Palin one such paid mouth piece of the plutocracy and the Tea Party the creation of paranoia?

While we as Americans may not necessarily agree with all of the analysis of a noted political assassination scholar Mr. Schneider as published by the Spiegel magazine on 21st January 2011 entitled ‘Inside the minds of Paranoiacs.’ There is nonetheless a riveting quote with which we as progressives should draw an important nexus; and that is the culture of the Republican Party according to this expert suggests that Sarah Palin can’t logically seem to disabuse herself of. Palin on the one hand appears to be promulgating a far right culture, which has at its heart suspicion of government mind control. While on the other hand she tries
to distance herself from that phenomenon which it is believed by some that it contributed to the tragic Arizona shooting.

SPIEGEL: Sarah Palin and the Tea Party have been accused of being partially responsible for a climate in the United States that can lead to such an incident. But Palin, using arguments similar to yours, rejects the larger society's paranoiac attempt to find an explanation and says that such acts stand on their own -- and are therefore random.

Schneider: Of course, it's absurd to assign the blame to Palin. But even without drawing paranoiac conclusions, one can immediately recognize a web of relationships into which the assassination fits and to which Loughner, the killer, consciously refers. And the fundamentalist Republic polemic is part of this context. Take, for example, the use of the term "mind control." This is the central, paranoiac concept of the American right, which assumes that the government controls the thoughts of citizens through language and the media. It's paradoxical for Palin to demand that we see the killings as an isolated incident, that is, a chance event. In doing so, she is suddenly abandoning the system of paranoia, with its accusations of mind control, that she and the Tea Party were more or less complicit in creating.

http://www.spiegel.de/...

This diary doesn't take a position on whether or not right wing hate radio attempts to exploit vulnerable mentally ill populations. However this diary does note that the right wing agenda in Arizona and across America in keeping with the Tea Party platform wants to roll back progressive health care reforms, therein leaving the 59 million Americans who are believed not to have medical insurance also not able to access mental health services. As such I invite you to give a close read to the quote below in the British Guardian newspaper.

Guardian.co.uk - Jared Lee Loughner and mental health crisis

We cannot know what was in the mind of the Arizona shooter, but we do know too many troubled people go without care
---------------------------------------------------

The bitter irony is that the governor of Arizona, Jan Brewer, who just last week was offering prayers of support to bereaved relatives in Tucson, has this week announced the suspension of Medicaid in Arizona in order to balance the budget. This will cut off healthcare, including mental healthcare, to more than a quarter of a million low-income Arizonans – people whose personal economic circumstances may look much as Jared Lee Loughner's did. It would be disrespectful to people with mental illness to call this policy mad, it's just very, very stupid.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/...

About 2 months ago, the British Guardian newspaper published a seldom if ever read statement by American audiences, which is to say they published that much of the American middle class who have now become America's nouveau poor in fact were working class folks who bridged the gap to a middle class lifestyle based on 30 years of the plutocracy saying let them eat credit and now it's over. The only question is will it ever come back? In which case we would have to ask how long before that credit bubble bursts again and then what? Are we then set for a third world America as Arianna Huffington tells us in her new book, Third World America: How Our Politicians Are Abandoning the Middle Class and Betraying the American Dream.

(Guardian.co.uk) America's new poor: the end of the middle-class dream
America's middle class is disappearing. A lifestyle sustained for 30 years by rising debt is dissolving as the credit dries up. And the question beyond the crisis is: can it ever come back?
---------------------------------------------------------
The kindest thing they could do is tell the truth: Americans have been living a middle-class lifestyle on working-class wages – and bridging the gap with credit. And it's over.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/...

Originally posted to Democrats Ramshield on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 05:13 AM PST.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (133+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    PeWi, claude, Renee, Lupin, Ed in Montana, Athena, PrahaPartizan, decisivemoment, mwm341, teacherken, mimi, emal, RAST, Pescadero Bill, Mnemosyne, route66, frisco, RFK Lives, expatjourno, leveymg, bluesteel, slatsg, Fe, Melanchthon, DeadB0y, pat bunny, churchylafemme, BMarshall, dkmich, zerelda, Deward Hastings, TexasLefty, vacantlook, schroeder, Julie Gulden, marina, radarlady, 3goldens, salmo, NoMoreLies, Jagger, SherwoodB, irate, Philoguy, LtdEdishn, panicbean, reflectionsv37, jimstaro, GreyHawk, quaoar, Pluto, Rogneid, JanL, Hear Our Voices, MJ via Chicago, FreeTradeIsYourEpitaph, soccergrandmom, blue in NC, a small quiet voice, Clive all hat no horse Rodeo, Dreaming of Better Days, The House, bigchin, One Pissed Off Liberal, dotsright, blue armadillo, camlbacker, HeartlandLiberal, Matt Z, Jimdotz, LamontCranston, joyful, puzzled, rivamer, SeaTurtle, kafkananda, flowerfarmer, scooter in brooklyn, dadadata, banger, phrogge prince, sagansong, rodentrancher, statsone, aufklaerer, output, banjolele, h bridges, IndyRobin, Losty, ohmyheck, Tommymac, Larsstephens, awcomeon, amk for obama, sunny skies, NM Ray, Bmeis, gulfgal98, skillet, Dahankster, croyal, BlackQueen40, QuestionAuthority, cama2008, laurnj, Wolf10, RadicalRoadRat, dle2GA, beforedawn, Hayate Yagami, Miggles, SoCalSal, bleedingheartliberal218, Azazello, Dom9000, BlueDragon, brainyblond, Pinto Pony, Mostel26, AnnieR, Joieau, swampyankee, Leo Flinnwood, supercereal, MartyM, Wendys Wink, notdarkyet, lunachickie, willie2011, miningcityguy, wxorknot, SimonBarSinister

    sig...You just ran into a hardcore progressive who's just another working stiff with an MBA degree & therefore a vociferous labor union supporter [smile]

    by Democrats Ramshield on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 05:13:03 AM PST

  •  If progressives would organize I think they would (31+ / 0-)

    ....certainly get the attention of  middle class citizens feeling the pain of job losses, an eroded tax base for localities ( that are finding it hard to provide services), and sensing their politicians are not on their side.   The time is ripe.  Social change only comes through active participation in public demonstrations....as we are currently witnessing.    

    Whatever the Foxteapublicans say, the opposite is the truth.

    by Forward is D not R on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 05:22:01 AM PST

    •  The thing is when Progressives organize (25+ / 0-)

      they're anti American traitors and need to be spied on and investigated. When aged baggers organize, they're patriots.  Just because we want Democracy to work for all, not just for the kids lucky enough to be born on 3rd base and their corporate masters.

      •  Labor (18+ / 0-)

        I learned about labor from Big Jim Kelly, the union carpenter who ran that 1950's shop at my first job.  What ever else he was, and he was at least unreconstructed, he was unconcerned about what he might be called.  I suspect that his attitude came directly from the needs of labor's class struggle, to which his links were personal.  Welcome to the 1920's reality.  We who make up the middle and working classes need to rediscover Big Jim's hard nosed lesson, our corporate overlords will fight with words and violence to keep their dominance and its rewards.  Calling us Anti-American traitors, and keeping files on the more vocal of us, will be the least of it.  

      •  Then Progressives FIRST (9+ / 0-)

        order of business is in my sig. We HAVE TO get that Telecomm Act fixed and we HAVE TO make people understand that The Media can just make shit up with impunity now. Honest reporters can be fired for wanting to tell the unfettered-by-spin truth.

        If we can't do that, we'll never get anywhere. The Comcast/NBC merger just rubbed our noses in it.  

        REPEAL the Telecomm Act & REVIEW this decision. NO journalist should be fired because their boss can't have the truth told

        by lunachickie on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:45:34 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  We are suffering (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        3goldens, Matt Z, laurnj

        what I would term a crisis of perception. The left is perceived as un American and has been villified for years now.
        The poor and the middle class are at each others throats, while the corporate masters cheer them on in a game of divide and conquer.
        Meanwhile, the talking heads in the media perpetuate the myth endlessly and the politicians follow suit as they collect the needed votes to run the game.

        "The greater the ignorance, the greater the dogmatism." Sir William Osler

        by wxorknot on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:33:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  The "aged baggers" (6+ / 0-)

        are fronts for the corporations anyway - so of course they are portrayed as "patriots"...and they're so old and cute in their little straw hats with teabags hanging from them...how could they be bad for America? They wave the flag and looove the Constitution and all..

        I find it grotesque that the entrenched corporate elite use our elders this way. I am appalled that the oountry is in the situation it is in. The propoganda that is allowed to spew unopposed from Limgaugh and the folks at Fox "news" is a big part of what ails our country - non-stop hate mongering and misinformation to delude and direct the ire of the gullible.

        And the corporate owned "mainstream" media lets them get away with it - they are complicit in the stupidization of America. What else can you call it?

        Republicans:"They don't let reality push them around. They just pretend the world is what they say it is." -- Dr. Stephen Colbert

        by blue armadillo on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:37:36 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  the 'aged baggers' (0+ / 0-)

          not only are being used, but most have no idea that they're in that position. And they are in serious denial that it could happen at all.

          I can't figure out if they're stupid, uneducated (despite some with advanced degrees), or just all living in some kind of never-never land.

          One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.--A.A. Milne

          by Mnemosyne on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 10:29:44 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I haven;t figured it out either (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Mnemosyne, salmo

            I know a number of educated folks that are tea party jihadis. Weird. Really weird.

            Although I have to say, they are all well to do and well set for retirement so they aren't really that worried about SS or Medicare etc. I think they get their news from Fox and are really ill-informed on the issues. Fox never gets in-depth although the producers take great pains to convince the audience that they do...and people who really are busy with their personal lives just don't have the time to follow up - and they believe what Fox is telling them.

            I really and truly believe the misinformation propoganda network that is FOX is a great destabilizing force in America.

            Republicans:"They don't let reality push them around. They just pretend the world is what they say it is." -- Dr. Stephen Colbert

            by blue armadillo on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 10:38:16 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  The tea party captures and directs anger (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              blue armadillo

              The folk I know who echo the tea party talking points are mostly just mad as hell.  It really matters little to them which specific target is chosen, and which theory of causation is being used to argue for one approach or another to address that anger, the emotion itself is the defining element.  They are partly right, of course, there is much about which we all should be angry.  What is happening, I think, is a manifestation of a well known narrowing of perspective in extreme stress or emotion, where their perspective is so narrow that they perceive only affiliation.  People at the fight or flight moment know only who they are with and who they are against.  You can't argue with them, especially if you are one of the group they see as the "other."

    •  public demonstrations don't work in America (18+ / 0-)

      If we're talking about getting a bunch of people together waving signs and a few giant puppets and chanting, "hey hey / ho ho / _____ has got to go," that and 50¢ will get you the Daily News.

      I'm sorry to be cynical, but it's hard not to be after seeing half a million people out front of the UN protesting the invasion of Iraq, and millions more around the world, who were all too easy to ignore.  Far from being inspired by the solidarity I witnessed in that crowd, I kept flashing on a depressing image of Dick Cheney watching us all on a monitor somewhere and laughing.

      We can't just express our displeasure loudly - these people don't care.  We're not going to get the kind of attention the Tea Party get as long as the other side controls the media.  We need to find a way to actually hurt them somehow.  This isn't going to be easy.  In the old-days, actions like sit-down strikes were effective because a strike in a factory stopped the factory running, and stopped the boss from making money.  That same tactic doesn't work, if the aggrieved workers are in Ohio and the factory is in Szechuan Provence.

      So that's the question we need to ask: how do we stop the boss from making money?  The boss, in this scenario, is first and foremost the banking sector.  So try and stay out of debt, although that's not realistic for most people.  Someone on this site suggested moving your debt to a small, local bank or a credit union, which is a good suggestion, but small potatoes in the grand scheme.

      Is there something else we can do?  Something big?  I'm afraid I don't have an easy answer.  But I think that's the question we need to be asking.

      You can't compromise with someone whose only aim is to destroy you.

      by schroeder on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:12:53 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  boycott was once thought to be a response... (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        hyperstation, AnnCetera, Matt Z, Mostel26

        ...but those need to be so tailored and specific because merely delaying purchase only creates a bottled need which in turn evens out as the boycotters eventually purchase that which they were boycotting (gasoline would be the easy example). that being said, there must be some way to incorporate such an idea, thereby keeping that which the plutocrats want, your money, out of their hands.
        Debt is a huge obstacle, mindset is another.

      •  Create an alternative economy (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AnnCetera, Matt Z, Dude1701, Joieau

        It is possible. But in order to make it possible we have to break our addiction to toys and fantasies that keep us enslaved like the boys on Pleasure Island in the story of Pinnocchio.

        We have the organizing tools now that we lacked in the 60's. Yet, at that time, we managed to do quite a lot--much of it stupid but we were naive and young. Today, there are two issues. One is that we have lost the virtue of courage somehow. Not just the left but the entire society. The other one is that we believe, often unconsciously, what the mainstream media is telling us. Don't. It's all a lie even when it is the truth. The MSM knows how to create a narrative where alternatives don't exist and nothing connects. If you connect dots then you are a conspiracy theorist. Of course, reading history honestly, you have to come to the conclusion that most political and economic events are mainly conspiracies--that's how human beings act. Few people who are serious about power play by the written rules--if there are rules they are only known to the elect.

      •  Lots of ways.... (8+ / 0-)

        Move your money out of the big banks and into small local banks and credit unions.  Move your money out of big brokerage firms like GS, JP Morgan and into brokerage houses that aren't a part of the scandal that created this disaster.   Stay out of big box stores and retail chains including pharmacies, shop local.   Buy American wherever you can.  Vote against incumbents regardless of party....

        An organized run on the banks is the best and safest protest.

        What we need is a Democrat in the White House.

        by dkmich on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:00:25 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  You answered your own question sort of (15+ / 0-)

        So that's the question we need to ask: how do we stop the boss from making money?  The boss, in this scenario, is first and foremost the banking sector.

        You hit them where it hurts.

        Demonstrations in the US don't work because all we do is march around, chant and hold up signs.  Until we get down and dirty they will ALWAYS ignore us.

        You want to hit them where it hurts you attack them in their wallets and stop them from making money.  Shut down Wall Street and I don't mean but using sit ins.  I mean by storming it and occupying Wall Street.  March on Koch Inductries and shut it down at the corporate headquarters level.  Hold the Koch brothers effectively hostage in their own lavish abodes by surrounding their homes and prevent them from leaving or anyone from coming.  You want to control the media, storm Fox News and shut it down.  A few dozen protesters in front of their office in NYC won't do.  A few hundred thousand in their studios will.  

        I'm talking about several hunderd thousand marching into the front door, right through the guardsor gates and into the building.  They can call all the security and try to stop the people but when confronted with that many people I suspect the security will join the marchers.  If they get the police and national guard to use tear gas an so on then the people need to walk like Egyptians on their asses and not let up until they're toppled.  

        Until that happens we will never get their attention.  The only way to get their attention is to shut the flow of money.  That's what happened in Egypt and that's why it got our attention.  Once the markets were affected by the uncertainty they took notice.  Until then they didn't give a rats ass about Tunisia, Lebanon, Libya, Algeria and so on.  It was only after their wallets were affected that they started running news on Egypt on CNBC and FOX.

        This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

        by DisNoir36 on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:11:52 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Couldn't agree more... (6+ / 0-)

          ...What got FDR the power to get the New Deal through was actual fear  by the Rich that the only alternative was a bloody revolution.  Thar's what get social changes through.

          Right now our elites fear nothing (and why should they?). We'll never get any changes through that way.

          OVER HERE: AN AMERICAN EXPAT IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE, is now available on Amazon US

          by Lupin on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:29:30 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Fear is the key (5+ / 0-)

            They use fear to fuck us over every goddamn day it's only fair that the tables be turned on them.

            Right after the Wall Street Collapse they were afraid because protesters were showing up at their homes and their offices.  AIG in Wilton CT took their name down from the sign in front of their office.  Some executives in Greenwich and Fairfield CT had people show up at their doors and they were shamed into returning their bonuses.  

            That kind of fear is what got results.  Otherwise they don't give a flying fuck about us.

            The sad part is I know where they live.  I know where Glen Beck lives and many execs including one from MetLife who just built a 5 million $ house.  I just won't stoop to their level and reveal it but there are many times where I am tempted.  In Glen Beck's case I really don't even have to since he's selling his house and it's all public record.  But until a mass of people show up at his door and make him afraid of being surrounded he won't give a shit.

            This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

            by DisNoir36 on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:37:35 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  Wherefore my sig (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Mnemosyne, 3goldens

            which I will be keeping after we've made the jump to the New, Improved Orange Satan. It seems to be appropriate for all circumstances.

            The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

            by sidnora on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:56:14 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  I don't think protests (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Mnemosyne, Mrs M

          can work in the US because we'r so physically large and far flung. I realized that sort of thing wouldn't work anymore in the run up to Iraq, when millions across America and the world protested and nobody cared. Making the protests violent just gets people killed. Nothing changes.

          The MSM would fall in record time if everybody simply turned off their televisions and talk radio. Uninstall the cable (as save money!), watch the occasional DVD for entertainment or get all those potatoes off the couch and go play tennis or disc golf or check out a museum. If nobody's watching Fox, MSNBC, et al. or listening to Rush & Co., they can't stay in business. Go back to bad old dial-up for awhile, learn to knit or something to make use of your time waiting for a website to load. If, when the smoke clears, media and journalism have to come begging the people how they can best serve us (instead of themselves) for a change, there might be honest reporting and a lot less brainwashing crap.

          I know, it'll never happen because the addiction is too acute. And for the life of me I can't figure out how ever more impoverished Americans manage to afford cable TV in their refrigerator boxes and tents. Or why they'd want to pay dearly for the dubious privilege of being bombarded every five minutes with obnoxious commercials designed to make them desire junk products (and drugs!) they don't need and can't afford anyway.

          Until the people stop playing their pre-scripted roles in rich people's Kabuki theater nothing is ever going to change. IOW, we have the power right here in our own hands and homes to change things, practically overnight. We don't, because we are collectively just as stupid and gullible as our overlords keep telling us we are.

          Now, more than ever, we need the Jedi.

          by Joieau on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 09:15:26 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  I like this idea, but we need to think it through (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Mrs M

          One thing the 60s-era Vietnam and Civil Rights protests have in common with the Egyptian protests going on right now is that they're aimed at the government.  A government, even an autocratic one, is beholden to the people to some extent.  But, if anything, we'd be mounting a pro-government protest, or a pro-good-government one, at any rate.

          Another thing is that each protest had is a clear, achievable, easily articulated goal.  Do we?

          Let's say we take over Fox News' control room.  What's our demand?  Stop being Fox News?  Fire Glenn Beck?  Another conspiracy-theory-spouting head will just spring up in his place.

          Personally, I think Wall Street is a good target.  Go after Fox News, and it just exacerbates the us vs. them mentality between us and working-class Republicans.  We need to all be on the same side here.  Wall Street has screwed everybody over, and therefore pretty much everyone in the country hates them to some extent.

          But again, what's our demand?  Something that they actually can do, and would do to avoid further protests?  I think there's a good diary in this, but maybe we can hash out some of the ideas in this thread first.

          You can't compromise with someone whose only aim is to destroy you.

          by schroeder on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 10:01:02 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  The Vietnam "War" was (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        3goldens, Matt Z, lostinamerica

        shut down due in a great part by the American people protesting. When it became a real threat to people's families because of the draft, then the protests began in earnest.After Kent State, it was apparent the end was coming...Protest is never wasted. Just keep watching Egypt...Remember Poland, Lech Walensa(sic), Solidarity?

        "Make it so", Jean-Luc Picard, captain of the Enterprise.

        by brainyblond on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:20:32 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  you are so right...... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          3goldens, Matt Z

          I hate that we are told we can't just get out of Afghanistan or get out of ___________.

          We did just that in Vietnam, but it was the draft that made it so and all the protesting.

          Nowadays people go about their business without a thought or care of all the military service people being injured, some permanently and or dying and for what?

          •  The all volunteer army makes (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            3goldens

            people think that it is Ok to send them to death. The Reichwing exploits the suffering and dying soldiers to further extend the corporatists profits and power. Truly, if the draft was reinstated, the end would be abrupt. No one likes their kids/husbands/brothers, sisters/ fathers/ mothers...to die.Damn the MIC to hell, and they that support these unjust wars.

            "Make it so", Jean-Luc Picard, captain of the Enterprise.

            by brainyblond on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:46:13 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  It's now, not then. (0+ / 0-)

          Then, our protests made front-page news. Now, the corporate media make sure that we're ignored if we take to the streets.

          The street demos just prior to the invasion of Iraq were the largest public demonstrations in world history; did you know that?

          If you didn't, why do you suppose that is so?

          I participated in several mass demos after that, but I gave up after being repeatedly, studiously ignored by the mass media. We'd get four paragraphs on page A18 of the New York Times and a 25-second comment on NPR, and that was it. What's the point of spending the time, money and effort to peaceably assemble several hundred thousand people if no one knows or cares that you did it?

          I don't want you to think that I'm pouting because my feeling are hurt; I could care less. All I care about is being effective, and as long as our media continue to belong to multinational corporations, peaceful protest will be ignored.

          The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

          by sidnora on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 09:05:16 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  I wish I didn't agree so much. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        3goldens

        And I have no easy answer either. I don't even have a difficult answer.

        I just worry more and more about what the endgame will produce. When you have 300,000,000+ people who've been conditioned to a certain level of entitlement, and they are watching their future circling the drain, what happens next? What happens once the corporate kleptocracy has finished squeezing all the capital out of the rest of the country? Violence, is what happens.

        It can happen here.

        The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

        by sidnora on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:52:54 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Meteor Blades had a (0+ / 0-)

      comment in another diary, about how the Beck is attacking Prof. Frances Fox Piven, that proposes a number of small protests in many locations, all coordinated for time and maximum impact.

      Many local protests would, as he points out, get lots of local media attention, and their coordination in timing would draw national attention.

      One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.--A.A. Milne

      by Mnemosyne on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 10:39:03 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Rethugs Blame Funemployment on Laziness (23+ / 0-)

    because it's what the richest 2% who own the Republican Party want their programmable idiot base to believe.

    When the programmable idiots end up unemployable, homeless, hungry, and hopeless, then maybe they can be reached through logic, fact, knowledge, evidence, reason, and rational thinking.

    Until then, the rethug reptilian-dominant brain of programmable idiots will continue accepting blatant propaganda, asinine lies, irrational fear, and illogical bullshit as Gospel TRUTH.

    •  To bleedingheartliberal218 - Well said (7+ / 0-)

      sig...You just ran into a hardcore progressive who's just another working stiff with an MBA degree & therefore a vociferous labor union supporter [smile]

      by Democrats Ramshield on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 05:41:04 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  This is why having a strong, quality educational (19+ / 0-)

      system for any society is a must.  

      Those societies that have lax critical thinking skills are the ones that are easily manipulated to do whatever the bidding of those who conduct and practice the manipulation.  It is subtle, but very dangerous for, and to all.

      Hey Boehner and the Republicans: WHERE ARE THOSE JOBS YOU PROMISED????

      by LamontCranston on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 05:49:27 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  and why the Nazis believed that a threat to (7+ / 0-)

        them was an independently educated populace.

        Where are all the jobs, Mr. Boehner? As a very proud gay American male, I am proud of the DADT repeal and am hopeful that ENDA will be law one day.

        by SimonBarSinister on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:34:10 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Unfortunately, not only do the teabaggers (15+ / 0-)

        and their plutocratic cronies control the mainstream media, they are also on their way to controlling the education of American students.

        School boards in many states and localities have become more and more infested by teabaggers who then force the teaching of fantasy and lies instead of fact-based and scientifically-proven reality.

        "Charter schools" and other sick excuses for undermining a functional system of public education are on the increase, and state legislatures are quickly mobilizing to increase the dominance of this scourge. For those unfamiliar with the term, "charter schools" are defined as "public" schools, and are funded with tax dollars, but their curricula and other aspects are governed by small groups of "insiders" rather than by elected school boards. In fact, some charter schools are morphing into business opportunities for "for-profit" providers of quasi-educational "services", opportunities for profiteering rather than education.

        Home-schooling has veered off the tracks and in many cases is dominated by religious and other special-interest forces. One of the largest producers of textbooks for homeschool use is the infamous Bob Jones University; the "textbooks" are, in many cases, little more than thinly-veiled religious tracts that deny evolution, deny climate change, promote dominionism principles, rewrite world and American history (example: Michelle Bachman's painfully false account of John Adams' and other "founding fathers'" tireless efforts to eliminate slavery in America would fit right in with BJU-think), and in general "teach" a toxic cocktail of disinformation, religious extremism, and absurdity. Many other purveyors of home-schooling materials are equally bad.

        Thus is the status of our elementary and secondary education system. Add to that the ever-popular demonization of teachers, teachers' unions, and school administrators and the relentless drumbeat by teabagger elected officials to defund local school systems, and we have the perfect recipe for increasing Teh Stoopid of America to Palin and Bachman levels.

        "Bernie Madoff's mistake was stealing from the rich. If he'd stolen from the poor he'd have a cabinet position." -OPOL

        by blue in NC on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:46:08 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  The sad part (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        3goldens, Matt Z

        Is that these fools that continue to push high stakes testing as THE PRIMARY way to measure students and teachers are killing education. If you read some of Gerald Bracey's work it will highlight my point here. The worst part is you get "progressives" on this site cheering for more of this garbage education policy. Our current President and his Sec of Ed have no clue when it comes to k-12 education.

      •  I couldn't agree more. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Matt Z

        There are certainly a lot of "things" that need to take shape before we as a nation come together.
        That being said, an educated populace without doubt is paramount to the changes we seek.

        Now, the key here is to convince the "other side" of the benefits, both individually and collectively.  

        "The greater the ignorance, the greater the dogmatism." Sir William Osler

        by wxorknot on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:12:21 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Sophomoric Renaming Reveals Discomfort (7+ / 0-)

      "Funemployment."  The very fact that they feel a need to try to re-brand a stain on society shows they know the system is failing.  They know they've failed.  They just want the party to continue a little longer at others expense and not get caught up in the whirlwind at the end.  It's why events in places like Tunisia and Egypt, as decried by the likes of John Bolton, scare the crap out of them.  They know.  They know.  It could be their turn next.

      "Love the Truth, defend the Truth, speak the Truth, and hear the Truth" - Jan Hus, d.1415 CE

      by PrahaPartizan on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:18:02 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I wish we'd just do it already (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Dave925, Matt Z, BaritoneWoman

        instead of waiting for someone to "lead" us. No one is going to "lead" us anywhere except down the road to Hell. We have to deal with that fact.

        REPEAL the Telecomm Act & REVIEW this decision. NO journalist should be fired because their boss can't have the truth told

        by lunachickie on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:47:24 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  i have somewhat made my "trivial" stand... (6+ / 0-)

          when i lost my job (and i honestly had looked forward to such an event) i had to take my 401k money out and pay off all debt except a car payment. i'm getting by on unemployment and living with my dad (and im' 52!), but what little money coming in is mine now. i have no intention of falling back into the quagmire that debt is, but i really doubt the powers that be are missing the little bit of revenue i represented.
          that being said, as more and more people crawl out of debt, they will become empowered by the freedom that entails...and there is strength in numbers. there needs to be a clamor from the multitudes that forces the government to lend a hand in order that our personal debt is diminished or expunged.
          you'd think that millions of americans would be seen as tbtf, and thereby worthy of bailing out also.

          •  The unemployed need to be in the street (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            hyperstation, 3goldens, Matt Z

            We need a day where every unemployed person hit the streets in protest. We need a day where every person without medical insurance hits the streets in protest. We need a day where every person with no dental insurance hits the streets in protest.

            •  We need a day where all people of this country (0+ / 0-)

              put their differences aside (those "wedge" issues), converge in DC, and tell the Plutocrats and Politicians of both parties that we, the people, mean business when it comes down to wanting our country to be better than it is for the majority, and not just for the minority.

              It’s really long overdue (to use a cliché scene from a movie called "V Is For Vengeance").... To have a "V" moment in DC on the Capitol Mall.

              And not once, but over, and over again, and again until our voices are heard, and those that manipulate the markets and our lives start running for the "proverbial hills" because they will know that the majority understand just the minority is attempting to do, and that it won’t work.  

              We will not let it work.

              We will not be down trodden.

              We will not let another day go by with lies and deceit.

              We will not go about our daily lives thinking it will get better because we know it will not.

              As someone once said:  "Enough".

              Hey Boehner and the Republicans: WHERE ARE THOSE JOBS YOU PROMISED????

              by LamontCranston on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 12:17:51 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

  •  The one bright spot,,, (13+ / 0-)

    for the labor movement over the last 30 years has been the public sector unions, those working for the government that can't be outsourced. These unions are under direct assault in the name of "austerity". As an SEIU member married to a retired teacher I'm very much aware of this assault.

    "Education is dangerous - Every educated person is a future enemy" Hermann Goering (NRSC?)

    by irate on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 05:30:32 AM PST

  •  I honestly think the U.S. is going to undergo a (16+ / 0-)

    dramatic political shift (to the left) in the next 10-20 years due to demographic and priority changes and it's going to start over the budget. It's just not sustainable to continue giving huge tax breaks to millionaires/billionaires and spend $720 billion A YEAR on the military while we have massive poverty, homelessness, unemployment, weak social safety nets, and an outrageous for-profit health care industry that is bankrupting the country.

    The right-wingers that continue to push "small government" that bans nearly everything they don't like and cuts to so many useful programs like Social Security and Medicare are going to lose because they're outnumbered and they're not offering any solutions to our problems. They can't keep campaigning on huge national defense, strongly conservative social policies, and tax cuts to those who need it the least when we have so many problems they aren't addressing and still win elections.

    Their attack on campaign finance laws (Citizens United et al) is their last desperate strategy as they realize their political effectiveness is weakening. They lost big in California despite spending massive $$ and I'm sure the same will happen in the next few Presidential and Congressional elections.

    •  I dunno (6+ / 0-)

      right wing radio makes it it's business to deflect from the financial sector and the war and blame unions. It's really, really powerful.  Even when you have Palin saying that "spudnuts" doesn't ask for a bailout after she bleated incoherently on about how we needed to implement TARP to save jobs during the Couric interview.  It doesn't matter, as long as they have the very loud voices on the right sowing doubt and deflecting, it will get harder and harder to get the message out.

      •  That's campaigning. Look what they do in office. (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JanL, Matt Z, Larsstephens, laurnj

        I have a feeling that the many Democrats and independents who stayed home in the 2010 midterms are going to see just how bad the Republicans are when they look at what the House is going to push out over the next 2 years. EVEN IF they win the Presidency and the Senate in 2012 (something I definitely don't want), that's just one battle.

        They have to actually govern and we saw just how well that went for them last time (2000-2008) and back then I'd say we weren't in as bad of a situation as we are today.

        •  That's where propaganda comes in to play. (0+ / 0-)

          Governments ruled by oligarchies that consistently steal from the populace and undermine their quality of life often do so successfully with the help of effective and relentless propaganda (FOX News). Constantly deflecting the anger and blame on to the opposition (Liberals and Democrats that won't go along), and lying about how desperate the financial system is and how austerity measures are required for survival (Count your blessings that you live in America!) while they pick our pockets.

          The depth to which the American people will sink will depend on the effectiveness of the Oligarchs propaganda organizations. So far, it looks like it's working out pretty well for them.

          The one thing I see standing in their way of total dominance of the debate is the internet. The last great bastion of populist free speech. That's why the meme throughout the Trad. Media is "Don't believe what you read on the internet." That will have to do them until they figure out a way of clamping down on it.

          Their emerging (and still young) propaganda apparatus is why I don't have very much faith in the future.

      •  Richland, Washington where Spudnuts is (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Larsstephens

        located was built by the Federal Government!  

      •  except (0+ / 0-)

        The number of people who right wing radio speaks to make up less and less of the elctorate every year. Look at Texas; 33% Lation and growing. That state will be VERY Blue by the time we get to 2020.

    •  Count the Votes, Not the Voters (8+ / 0-)

      "...The right-wingers that continue to push "small government" that bans nearly everything they don't like and cuts to so many useful programs like Social Security and Medicare are going to lose because they're outnumbered and they're not offering any solutions to our problems. They can't keep campaigning on huge national defense, strongly conservative social policies, and tax cuts to those who need it the least when we have so many problems they aren't addressing and still win elections..."

      State governments are so much more pliable than the Federal government, and the conservatives can readily seize control of state governments, which actually define the requirements for the voting franchise.  Remove most people from the voting rolls and your electoral problems are solved.  Only the elite should be allowed to select our leaders according to these neo-aristocrats anyway.  The rest of us are merely allowed to take up space in their country at their sufferance.

      "Love the Truth, defend the Truth, speak the Truth, and hear the Truth" - Jan Hus, d.1415 CE

      by PrahaPartizan on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:10:39 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Electoral reform is very important. I think we (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Matt Z, rivamer, Larsstephens, laurnj

        need to repeal felony voting disenfranchisement laws, allow incarcerated people to vote, and adopt vote-by mail in every state. We are one of the very few countries that has our national voting day take place on a weekday (as opposed to a weekend) and not be a holiday. Vote-by-mail solves the convenience problem that prevents many people from voting but many states don't allow it. Luckily some members of Congress are working to fix that: http://en.wikipedia.org/...

    •  damn, i sooo hope ur right. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Matt Z, Larsstephens

      Where are all the jobs, Mr. Boehner? As a very proud gay American male, I am proud of the DADT repeal and am hopeful that ENDA will be law one day.

      by SimonBarSinister on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:36:30 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I doubt it, but it's possible (6+ / 0-)

      The reason I doubt it is because "framing" has become such an art people don't notice it. Public Relations and Advertising are able to use the result of social science research of the past hundred years to good use. Most Americans have no idea what is being done to them in terms of engineering consent and consensus.

      Having said that there is a kind of hope. Something could happen that is positive if we understand how deep we are programmed to believe in the neo-liberal/corporatists ideology. In short, turn off the mainstream media! We are are being dominated not with thugs (not yet anyway) but by corporate propaganda is, every year, further removed from reality. From that understanding we can begin to form affinity groups that, in my view, have to move towards an independent economic, cultural and political situation. Declare independence!

    •  I agree. Though it may take more social (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Matt Z, Mrs M

      dislocation, and economic duress.
      And the time frame for that is
      undetermined, and unclear at best.

      The question is whether the
      super elite globalists will
      be prescient and wise enough
      to realize that they have overplayed
      their own redistribution hands?
      And to what degree will they allow redress?
      Or does the will to power and greed
      blind those who have been so fortunate?

      As the political turmoil everywhere attests,
      there is no place to run or escape to.
      The tipping point in our own nation approaches.

      The extreme factions at both ends of the political spectra
      will not be joining forces in any meaningful capacity.
      Fortunately, they represent a distinct minority,
      even in their combined numbers. This leaves the
      great majority to somehow find commonality, and
      pursue solutions that allow progress for all.

      It will be difficult work, but what are the options?

      Thanks for all of your efforts.

  •  Why don't you come back and fight with us? (5+ / 0-)

    "Say little, do much." (Pirke Avot 1:15)

    by hester on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 05:35:46 AM PST

  •  Well written with great back up quotes from (12+ / 0-)

    other important observers in the international media.

    Thank you, and let's hope many will read and truly understand what you wrote:  It is imperative.

    Tipped 2'x's if I could.

    Hey Boehner and the Republicans: WHERE ARE THOSE JOBS YOU PROMISED????

    by LamontCranston on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 05:44:41 AM PST

  •  IMHO we already have become ... (9+ / 0-)

    ''Third World America''.

    There has been a shift in wealth distribution over the past 30 years or so, yes it's already happended.

    The top 1% are happy with the status quo, they certainly will not pay more taxes, or inheritance taxes or corporate taxes for that matter.

    SCOTUS has undermined the integrity of elected institutions across the country in favor of corporations.

    The clarion call should be for real democrats, progressives, and liberals to join forces and fight this corporatocracy greed machine that now chooses our elected officials and makes laws benefitting their agendas.

    The working class and middle class in America have a huge transformation to undergo if they want to see any change in the current wealth disparity gaps.

    •  Think of Typical "3rd World" Traits (15+ / 0-)

      Exporting raw mat'ls to import mfr'd goods.
      Not possible for most people to be well informed.
      Large religious factions regarding others as literal enemy.
      Extreme wealth concentration.
      Military outsized beyond any credible threat.
      Surveillance state.

      Bad news for your clarion call though, many Democrats are conservatives quite supportive of this history.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 05:51:08 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  so Gooserock.... (5+ / 0-)

        you seem to agree about the third world traits already existing, and yet you say bad news as many democrats are conservatives who support this history.

        I think you missed my point, which is a clarion call for real democrats, progressives and liberals to join forces now to fight the corporatocracy our nation has become.

        If not we will be in the streets rioting when food prices go sky high, and enough people are homeless and hungry.

        Really thats all it takes is that dose of austerity that turns into severe poverty which will be in all states soon if nothing is done.

  •  Don't worry about us. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lupin, 3goldens, JanL, aufklaerer

    Didn't you hear? Were going to out innovate and out dream everyone...
    Here is a nice antidote to that B.S. courtesy of Naked Capitalism.

    http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/...

  •  We're Not Falling, We're Incrementally Climbing (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    slatsg, Dave925, JanL, Matt Z, Larsstephens

    We have been incrementally climbing since 1976.

    --You can look it up.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 05:47:53 AM PST

  •  Situation is critical, but the trigger event (7+ / 0-)

    still is hard to imagine.  What will finally set off the brewing mass of confusion and discontent that is the American middle-class?

    As we're seeing in the Middle East, social revolution is not an isolated event.  People need to see by example that taking to the streets actually works.

    Will we be the last to revolt, and what will it take to finally set us off the couch?

  •  The main reason, voters, and the belief (4+ / 0-)

    that a strong social saftey net will benefit people who don't look like them.

  •  And your point is? (14+ / 0-)

    What would you have us do?  Armed conflict in the streets, ala Egypt?

    We are standing up - what the hell do you think we're doing here?  Some/most of us are active as hell in our local politics.  We vote, campaign, donate, etc.  Other than that, I can't see what else we can do that doesn't involve violence.

    And if that's what you're suggesting, count me out.  I've told my kids to leave this fucked up country, and I'm stuck dying here.  Probably sooner rather than later as I'm one of the lucky uninsured folk.

    America is filled, literally filled, with morons.  Beck, etal would not be on the air if this country didn't have so many fools living in it.  I don't see that changing ever.  This country will fall, it's just a question of when.  We are dumber than the Romans, by a mile.  

    Your flag decal won't get you into heaven anymore. John Prine -8.00,-5.79

    by Miss Blue on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:06:47 AM PST

    •  Violence will not start with the workers (9+ / 0-)

      The violence will not start with the workers.  Who fired on whom at the Ludlow Mine?  When America's remaining middle class, and the working class, figure out a way to hurt our corporations and oligarchs through some sort of mass action, our overlords won't be satisfied with just calling us names.  They never were in the past.  

    •  yes, like egypt (6+ / 0-)

      we had control of the house, senate, and presidency for 2 years and almost nothing happened.

      its 2011 and the democrats are still keeping their powder dry. they never intend to use it, they work WITH republicans to mutually secure political power. our government is a farce, a sham, it serves the rich, not We the People, and for that reason alone it is our duty as American citizens to replace it with all due haste. our elections only let us choose what the face of the corporatocracy is.

      republican, democratic, left, right, these words serve only to confuse the situation in the US. there are 2 groups. the rich and the poor. the rich are actively trying to kill of the poor through their control of government economic policy, for their own profits. I see no reason to respect any of the rights of the people actively trying to kill the poor through neglect.

      unless we rise up, we are all going to die, cold and hungry. (and im already cold and hungry)

      The Republic has fallen.

      by Dude1701 on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:11:33 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I don't think we're going to turn into.... (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      3goldens, Matt Z, Dude1701, Tom Taaffe

      ...Tunisia either, but we should, because otherwise, the on;y alternative is to turn into India or Brazil. And I think that's what's happening.

      OVER HERE: AN AMERICAN EXPAT IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE, is now available on Amazon US

      by Lupin on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:34:04 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  No we are not (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      3goldens, Dude1701

      We are sitting on our hands while Obama and the Democratic leadership throw the poor, the working class and the working middle class under a bus.

      I am completely disgusted with this shit. I have no intention of supporting this banker/wall street-driven economic policy for one fucking second.

      So let Obama add another goldman sachs employee to his team, let him 'shore up' his support with the banking and Wall Street community.

      Let them vote for this bullshit. No one south of the investor class will vote for him again.

      No wait, bankers and the financial markets may give money to Obama, but they'll pull the lever for the Republicans when they vote themselves.

      So who will vote for this shit in 2012?

      Warning, warning, will robinson, this party is heading for disaster..............

      •  I am NOT sitting on my hands (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Matt Z

        Further, I will vote for Obama if he is the Democratic Party choice.  

        In the real world, alternatives should be considered.  And the alternative to Obama is not something I will ever support.  Further, Obama vs. Whomever is NOT equivalent.  

        Your flag decal won't get you into heaven anymore. John Prine -8.00,-5.79

        by Miss Blue on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:23:23 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Maybe dumber than the Romans but getting to be (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Miss Blue

      just as brutal. With our cheeseball ideas of empire.
      The Romans believed in their 'exceptionalism' too, absolutely.

  •  Fox panders to people who LIKE to consider (8+ / 0-)

    themselves victimized. Eventually ... as more and more of Fox viewers ARE victimized by the disintegration of the American economy, maybe even Fox-watchers will realize that there's something actually wrong with an orgnization of society where only the richest 10% have bearable lives. Make that 5%. Or maybe 1%.

    Fox is probably working up propaganda campaigns to be unleashed then to blame all of our ills on some "other".

  •  We've been clandestinely circulating... (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lupin, ILDem, Matt Z, Kickemout

    ...cassettes of your speeches, and when the regime breaks down you can return triumphantly from exile.

    APSCU is the trade group of diploma mills that rip off students and the government.

    by Rich in PA on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:18:57 AM PST

  •  If You Haven't Noticed (7+ / 0-)

    Pay closer attention to those, especially so called representatives, who will quickly attack issues like Health Care as 'socialist' programs of other countries that don't work, they'll even give a list of how they don't, knowing full well their flocks won't check out the facts.

    Then listen to them when it's an issue They want to change, like privatization of government services etc., they quickly start naming some country who has done so and try and say how great it all works, once again if researched one finds that not really to be the case.

    I've watched this for a long time, yet it gets little play in any debate as the talking points are pushed over and over and the cultist parrot same and don't pay attention when their facts are readily debunked!!

    Women say 7,000 a day, Men 2000plus, little sarah at around 28,000 w/no common sense nor idea's!

    by jimstaro on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:26:32 AM PST

    •  Agreed. It's about trust. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Matt Z, Larsstephens

      GOP has done a MUCH MUCH better job of creating validators for their views, funding them, equipping them, and testing their talking points.

      We don't like doing that on the left because we're reality-based.

      Stop clapping. Stop screaming. Open your mind. Listen.

      by Benintn on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:34:53 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I'm standing up. (4+ / 0-)

    But I'm just one guy.

    Stop clapping. Stop screaming. Open your mind. Listen.

    by Benintn on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:32:57 AM PST

  •  We need a tax increase on almost everyone. (8+ / 0-)

    What we need is what we had in the 1950's; 27 levels of taxes with the top rate at 90% - truly progressive!  I just read somewhere that some CEO made $22 million last year.  No one needs to make that kind of money.  

    I disagree with raising corporate tax rates.  What we should do is lower corporate tax rates and persuade companies to bring work back to us.  That would get millions of people back to work.  Tax the people as there is so many more of them!  

    •  Behavioral science provides some guidance (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dave925, Matt Z, laurnj, Tom Taaffe

      No contingencies, no performance!  That is true for mice, monkeys and men.  Rewards need to be in place, and some discussion of what constitutes a sufficient reward structure should begin.  However, international experience strongly suggests that such excessive rewards are actually counterproductive in that they reduce the effect of contingencies.  What is clear is that our current reward and tax system is sub-optimal by any reasonable standard.

    •  If we lowered corporate tax rates--- (9+ / 0-)

       The companies would hoard the money faster, (like they are doing now). They would set up MORE plants overseas to make their NIKE shoes, and everything else. People and nation aren't important to them, it's PROFIT!!

    •  There's not enough faith in government (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      laurnj

      I believe the rise of the extreme right is a big vote of no-confidence in the government. Whether it is right or wrong that's a political fact. How to change that is the question.

      I personally, having worked in the federal gov't for some time, don't have much faith in government and would not be happy paying more taxes when I get very little bang for the buck. I'm one of those people who is familiar with living abroad and nowhere in the developed world do people live in as much economic fear and anxiety as people live here. No one in Europe has to put off medical exams because they are uninsured--or can't afford prescriptions and have to do without medications. I had to do that for awhile until I got my last job. People fall through the cracks here all the time and in rapidly increasing numbers and the government doesn't do anything for them. They do quite a lot for the corporate oligarchs. That's why tax increases will never be popular even though you and I know that health insurance, education and so on should be a government responsibility--not necessarily to run those sectors but to guarantee access to them.

      •  this is exactly what neoliberals (0+ / 0-)

        and paleo-conservatives have wanted from the get-go .. lack of trust in government.  I make the distinction between trust in RIGHT-WING government of the corporations and the rich versus government of, by, and for all the People.  IMHO, it's an important distinction to make.

        •  Agreed (0+ / 0-)

          But government has always a tendency towards tyranny of the elites. What we lack today is political balance. Government is so tied up in knots with contradictory regulations and, in this decade, an almost insane obsession with "security" and keeping things secret and opaque. The fact government works as well as it does is a testament to many fine people who work hard every day. But its actions are becoming increasingly futile as we enter into a permanent gridlock in the Capital where corporations own everything.

    •  Ceos and greed (4+ / 0-)

      I just read that the CEO of Goldman Sachs got a raise of 200%.  

      I can't imagine what kind of raise he would have gotten had he not contributed to our economic collapse.

      Lowering corporate taxes won't do shit.  If you don't believe me go ask Ireland.

      What we need is for the gov't to hold corporations by the balls and tell them that either they pay their fucking taxes or they don't do business in the USA.

      Then you'll see how quickly they pay their taxes, regardless of the rate.

      This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:29:42 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  agree totally (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Matt Z, Tom Taaffe

        this corporate madness has to be stopped.

        Who on this planet can justify why Blankenfein would get a 200% raise ?

        We are so whacked out by MSM lies,  pundits trash talk, and polls of this or that, that don't really add up.

        What the fuck people, rub 2 brain cells together every now and then.

      •  To DisNoir36 - Great post (0+ / 0-)

        Very well said. Corporations need to pay their fair share of the taxes.

        sig...You just ran into a hardcore progressive who's just another working stiff with an MBA degree & therefore a vociferous labor union supporter [smile]

        by Democrats Ramshield on Tue Feb 01, 2011 at 05:27:19 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Lower the corporate tax rates (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      billlaurelMD

      but increase the effective tax paid by getting rid of the loopholes and putting in place a corporate alternative minimum tax for the largest corporations so that profitable firms like Exxon Mobil or GE at least pay some tax.

      Despite high corporate taxes, US corporations hardly ever pay the advertised rates, and many escape tax liabilities altogether. They pay a much lower portion of the total tax burden than they paid 50 years ago.

      Sustainable landscaping in the Kos Katalogue

      by NoMoreLies on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:45:54 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  To riff on Clinton (10+ / 0-)

    "It's the war, stupid"

    Desiderius Erasmus, once said: "War is delightful to those who have no experience in it".

    by BOHICA on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:37:22 AM PST

  •  The Product of American Workers (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, Mostel26

    What do American Workers make today?  Big Macs and Greetings to Shoppers who enter Walmart to fill their carts with goods made in China.  Sorry.  That's just about the sum total to what America's businesses have reduced their workers output.

    Is it the blame of America's workers or is it the blame of America's plutocracy which has decided to continue to plunder the wealth?

    •  exactly the point (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Matt Z, laurnj

      things need to be made in america again, start taxing the shit out of imports to encourage this.

      And besides americans have no money to buy all the cheap crap coming out of China anyways.

      I was shopping for a microwave oven, and found out that all of them - every freaking brand that you thought was american made are now made in either korea or china. They are made so freaking cheap so as to be ''throw aways'' - if it breaks buy a new one - this is the mentality that has to stop.

      •  so true regarding quality (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        NoMoreLies, Matt Z, lostinamerica, laurnj

        When I moved into my first house in 1995, it had an avocado green fridge, stove and diswasher from the 70's.  I was unhappy with the color, but those appliances ran like a top--and they were over 20 years old.  I had not one problem with them.  Then I moved in 2003 and purchased the whole stainless steel array of the same appliances.  Fridgedaire "Professional" series. I probabably don't have to go into the details of the quality comparison between these and the Kenmores from the 70's.  The Fridgedaire line was made in the hinterlands of China.

        •  I still have my Maytag washer (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Matt Z

          from the early 70s; when I moved I paid to move it with me. Still runs, no problems. Well worth the expense of moving! For a fridge splurged and got a small made in America SunFrost; 50% energy savings versus a conventional regrigerator (even the "energy star" ones) and quiet as a mouse.

          Democrats give you the Bill of Rights; Republicans sell you a bill of goods!

          by barbwires on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:13:28 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  McIntosh audio and Klipsch loudspeakers.... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            lostinamerica

            ....from the height of American production - late 1950's to 1960's. These pieces are of such quality and durability that they can be passed down through generations, yet are simple enough that they can easily be rebuilt and restored with respect to critical electronics (and gave some great people a job in the process). I wouldn't trade these for anything new today - the performance is of such quality that I would never change them.

            I also have a particular fetish for the vacuum tube, as it is my opinion that music was meant to be played through them.

            ....and then of course the La-Z-Boy, whose mechanism has taken my flopping in it for 35 years, and works as well today as it did 35 years ago - oh and it has the original upholstery and looks good.

            So it's no accident that when I buy durable goods, I often look for used, because often that 30+ year old item is better than any new one you could buy today.

      •  I buy at thrift stores (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        barbwires, Matt Z, lostinamerica

        the "made in America" merchandise. Sure, there are bangs, and scratches sometimes, but the "Made in USA" tag means it is quality made and will last. I looked one time, and everything in my kitchen, (well, not everything), but mostly, had the "made in China" tags.I have over the last two years began to substitute the cheap junk, for American made.I might use antique cooking implements and other useful objects in my home, but I seldom have to replace anything now.

        "Make it so", Jean-Luc Picard, captain of the Enterprise.

        by brainyblond on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:57:50 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  my prized possession of late is (0+ / 0-)

          a very old hamilton beach roaster oven - not the spiffy glass fronted light weight ones now produced oversease, but a HUGE big tan and brown cooking box that is absolutely AWESOME! (heck, thought i was going to have to build it a separate counter but it JUST fits by the sink!

          whether roasting meats or veggies - i turn it on and set my phone alarm to go in to turn it off.  perfect every time!

          thrift shop.  $20 instead of $150+ for a "new" one that doesn't work as well!

          MOVE'EM UP! ROLL'EM OUT... MOVE'EM UP RAWHIDE!!! meeeoooow! mrraaarrr!! meeeOOOOOW!

          by edrie on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 12:32:50 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  To NM Ray - Good question (0+ / 0-)

      sig...You just ran into a hardcore progressive who's just another working stiff with an MBA degree & therefore a vociferous labor union supporter [smile]

      by Democrats Ramshield on Tue Feb 01, 2011 at 05:22:05 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  America is exceptional. It's leadership, however (0+ / 0-)

    is unexceptional.   We need better leaders, not Europe Lite, thank you.

    If you lose your disc or fail to follow commands, you will be subject to immediate de-resolution. That will be all.

    by SpamNunn on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 06:50:27 AM PST

    •  Who could disagree? Please unpack. (0+ / 0-)

      "Better leaders," sure -- who could disagree with that?  And "Europe Lite" sounds like a lame beer that I would definitely take a pass on.  OK, so what happens when these slogans' rubber hits the road?

      If we had the good leaders, and not the lame eurobeer, what would that look like, in terms of people's actual lives?

      For example, in your opinion, what would distinguish a "better leader?"  What would be better about him or her, other than general awesomeness?

      And, also in your opinion, what specific policies, outcomes, conditions, etc., are to be avoided as "Europe Lite?"

    •  To SpamNunn - As usual (0+ / 0-)

      I politely disagree with you. Thanks for posting.

      sig...You just ran into a hardcore progressive who's just another working stiff with an MBA degree & therefore a vociferous labor union supporter [smile]

      by Democrats Ramshield on Tue Feb 01, 2011 at 05:19:59 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  American Karma (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, Tom Taaffe

    nuff said

    i have a magic pony, and it still goes poop

    by ronny mermaid on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:08:10 AM PST

  •  Bankruptcy Filings Substitute For Rebellion (4+ / 0-)

    The middle class can't get the money back from the energy industry, the health care industry and consumer culture fraud. But they can tell the financial industry to fuck off.

  •  I've (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, BlueDragon, Tom Taaffe

    been standing for a while now. Looking around. Looking around to see others standing with me.

  •  the DEMOCRATS sold out the working man, not (6+ / 0-)

    the GOP.  The GOP pursued its well known policy...

    AND THE DEMOCRATS FAILED and worse, COLLUDED to end New Deal Liberalism.  The Democrats killed the New Deal, not the GOP... and it started with Jimmy Carter.  

    When are people gonna here figure that out, I wonder?...

    So much finger pointing at Republicans, who are only doing what they've wanted to forever and what they said they would do.

    "CLEAN UP YOUR SIDE OF THE STREET FIRST"

    The DEMOCRATS are the PROBLEM.

    STUPID FUCKING DEMOCRATS.  LIARS ALL.

    "History is a tragedy, not a melodrama." - I.F.Stone

    by bigchin on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:27:45 AM PST

  •  It's Really Hard to Focus (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, Dude1701, Tom Taaffe

    on Standing Up when your Mind is TOTALLY occupied with
    Basic survival Issues. The Tipping point is somewhere
    out there. Recent events in Tunisia and Egypt provide a
    Very Clear example of what might Happen.

    We have been told our entire lives that America was
    "Exceptional", Thanks in Large part to our "Democratic"
    form of Government. It was a Wonderful IDEA.

    Fast Forward to 2011. Our Media is Controled by
    monolithic multinational Corporations. Our Tax system is
    RIGGED to benefit the wealthy at the expense of the poor.
    Our So-Called Representatives are little better than
    Corporate WHORES. Our Banking system has FAILED and we
    are now 14 Trillion dollars in Debt.

    No question about it. Our "Democracy" has FAILED.
    I know It. You Know it. Do the People making the Decisions Know It?
    Absolutely NOT. They don't have a Clue.
    And they Don't WANT to Know.
    Why would they?
    They have EVERYTHING they want. That is ALL that matters.

    I fear that our Tipping point is rapidly approaching.
    The Government we are Ordered to Support does NOTHING
    to support US in Return. It would appear that the folks
    living in Egypt have the same opinion regarding their
    government.

    I am hoping that we don't go That Way.

    I think I'll spend the Afternoon Cleaning my Gun Collection.

    Just in Case.

    On Giving Advice: Smart People Don't Need It and Stupid People Don't Listen

    by Brian76239 on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:36:52 AM PST

  •  What do you call a 'progressive' with no class (4+ / 0-)

    consciousness?

    A liberal Republican.

    That's what I think of the progressive movement these days. An opinion that deepens and becomes more convicted every time someone sends me an email on an issue other than bread and butter issues.

    Please don't ask me what I think of any democrat more conservative than that......

    Last year's election was a fucking disaster. The next one will be worse, if this party doesn't stop siding with bankers and the markets. Obama's 'competitive' campaign is stinking up the cheap seats.

  •  "Someone has to fail for me to succeed" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, lostinamerica

    It's a sick mindset, but it's widely held.  Americans love to take sides.  Until we decide that all of us are on the same side, we will all fail.

    We kidnap. We torture. It's our policy. Embrace it or end it!

    by Mosquito Pilot on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:55:24 AM PST

  •  We are already Socialist. (6+ / 0-)

    Except that instead of socialism for the people, it is corporate socialism.  And, the corporate socialism of risk and privatization of benefit, including socialism of corruption, is not talked about in the media.  The media, and our government is complicit in the looting of our nation.

    Distrust of authority should be the first civic duty. - Norman Douglas

    by Fossil on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:55:46 AM PST

  •  gives new meaning to (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MixedContent

    "walk like an Egyptian".

    I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's. - Mark Twain

    by route66 on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 07:56:05 AM PST

  •  Americans Revolting? Like the Egyptians? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, BigAlinWashSt

    Or the Tunisians? But that would interfere with my Super Bowl, or American Idol is coming on or I need to play with my Wii.

    America, They were yours, Honor Them, Do Not forget them-IGTNT.

    by Mr Stagger Lee on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:05:50 AM PST

  •  The plutocaracy is so ingrained in both parties (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, Dude1701, Tom Taaffe

    and powered by national and international banks, giant corporations, the MSM, the MIC, and powerful interests like the Trilateral Commission and the Council on Foreign Relations.  The creation of the Tea Party itself is a product of that and could not have happened without that power and money.  That's the problem I have with trying to start a truly progressive party offshoot.  How can it be done without the same kind of backing?  

    S.A.W. 2011 STOP ALL WARS "The Global War on Terror is a fabrication to justify imperialism."

    by BigAlinWashSt on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:06:38 AM PST

  •  Recognizing that Obama is an enemy... (4+ / 0-)

    ...of the American Dream is the first step.

    His policies are taking the country in the same direction as Bush's: Endless war, a growing gap between rich and poor, and shrinking civil liberties. And he has now started to destabilize Social Security by cutting the payroll tax.

    But we still have a huge majority of Democratic Party voters refusing to face the reality that Obama is a Third Way, DLC, Blue Dog, neoliberal warmonger whose contempt for the Constitution is greater than Dick Cheney's.

    Doesn't matter how many times one cites the Obama Administration's actual policies and actions to back that statement up, the Obama apologists can be counted on to change the subject (usually by making ad hominem attacks on the critic) in an attempt to obscure reality.

    •  well I recognized it before he got elected..... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      expatjourno, MixedContent, Tom Taaffe

      and all the Obama apologists in the country can't change my viewpoint, as Obama's actions speak loudly.

      I want a reality check on the state of our democracy, instead of all the ad hominem attacks.

    •  your idea of reality is (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      expatjourno

      narrowly held, to put it mildly.

      U.S. leftists and Greens and even progressive Democrats have been saying "until the American people wake up" since the 1960s (well, that's in my lifetime, I'm sure it's been going on a lot longer than that.)

      Apparently, just saying that inside your own little bubble doesn't really work, does it? It does allow yourself to think more highly of your own moral character, while you continue leading your own (most likely) comfortable life. somewhere outside of the U.S. apparently.

      One problem is that Greens and other critics of the Democratic Party from the left don't think it important to engage very much with their neighbors who make up the "majority." (I know this from many years of personal experience.) They don't think highly of everyday people, and organizing "the sheeple" bores them.

      Instead, they like to dream about some one big event or charismatic leader that will finally sweep away all the bad, and ring in the new.

      sigh.

      Many Democratic voters are not well-informed about the role their country plays and has played in world history or even what's gone on here; that's very true. The question is, how to change that? How to ensure that U.S. gov't represents the interests of its ordinary citizens? We've heard your diagnosis for decades now; the interesting question is what is the solution? And how to implement it? Do you have any real concrete ideas about how to do that? If so, let's hear them, please.

      •  Obama's economic, social and foreign policies (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        expatjourno

        are indefensible. So what are we supposed to be defending?

        How can you argue Obama's creating jobs when we've lost ours? How can you argue Obama's making it easier for homeowners to save their homes, when he's siding with the bankers against them?  How can we defend his war-driven foreign policy when we elected him to get us out of these fucking wars?

        When Democratic leaders buy into every Republican corporatist and imperial belief, what is there for us to defend?

        •  I don't think I used the word "defend" did I? (0+ / 0-)

          perhaps you meant to reply to somebody else?

          I'd still like to hear expatjourno's thoughts (or yours) addressing the more interesting question: after 50 years of diagnosis, how do we implement the changes we'd like to see in our country and our government, or even how do we communicate our solutions to the problems we've spent a lifetime diagnosing to the majority of Americans?

      •  Amazingly narrowly held. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MixedContent

        What's Obama's approval rating among Democrats? About 80%? While he continues the policies that are impoverishing the vast majority of Americans, trampling on the Bill of Rights and slaughtering innocent people in a continuation of Bush-Cheney's "War on Terror."

        What, indeed is the answer? I would have thought the facts would be obvious. But the self-delusion of Obama's supporters is awesome.

        Apparently, just saying that inside your own little bubble doesn't really work, does it? It does allow yourself to think more highly of your own moral character, while you continue leading your own (most likely) comfortable life. somewhere outside of the U.S. apparently.

        First of all, I don't see how you can claim I'm just saying that inside my own little bubble when I'm confronting Obama supporters on this site all the time with the facts. Second, you have no idea what I'm doing under my real name. The rest of your statement is just a cheap shot and not worth responding further to.

        Many Democratic voters are not well-informed about the role their country plays and has played in world history or even what's gone on here; that's very true. The question is, how to change that?

        One voter at a time until the electorate changes enough that politicians like Obama can't get away with what they are doing. And this site is as good a place as any to start. Social media is also a tool that every one of us has access to with potentially exponential effects. As we are seeing in the news from abroad. And that's where it starts. With each of us, as individuals, using what little influence we have. Because it all adds up.

        RFK's words are as true today as they werewhen he spoke them on June 6, 1966, in Cape Town.

        Few will have the greatness to bend history itself, but each of us can work to change a small portion of events, and in the total of all those acts will be written the history of this generation....

        Each time a person stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, these ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.

        The text is here.

        •  this site IS "a little bubble" (0+ / 0-)

          JFK would be the first to say complaining about how bad things are is not "working" or "standing up" or or "acting" -- especially if it's talking amongst ourselves, which is what we do here.

          Like progressives have been doing for 50 years (while, mostly, continuing to lead our comfortable lives and feeling morally superior to our neighbors -- the cheap shot wasn't directed against you personally, except the ex-pat part, I'll admit to that).

          the interesting thing about dKos from the beginning was that there was an action plan -- the idea that working to elect more and better Democrats to office would exponentially effect the way the gov't worked, would eventually push the gov't to represent the interests of everyday people, not the interests of corporations and those at the top.

          Your action plan is social media? OK, fine. whatever. good luck.

          •  I don't see you coming up with anything better. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MixedContent

            It's RFK, not JFK.

            It's not just "complaining," it's pointing out the truth, one person at a time, to people who are still deluded enough to believe that Obama and the Democratic Party leadership are not part of the problem. We will get nowhere as long as those people command the loyalty and respect that they do.

            Most of us have very little power. All we CAN do as individuals is to stand up for what's right.

            "More" Democrats clearly did not help at all. It's going to take "better" Democrats.

            Social media is important enough to corporations that they now spend billions of dollars using social media to influence consumers to buy their products. You are behind the times.

            And people who oppose impoverishing the vast majority of Americans, trampling on the Bill of Rights and slaughtering innocent people in a continuation of Bush-Cheney's "War on Terror" ARE morally superior to those who support those policies.

            Each time a person stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope... --RFK

            by expatjourno on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 10:19:08 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  Some people defend their ignorance belligerently (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        expatjourno

        One problem is that Greens and other critics of the Democratic Party from the left don't think it important to engage very much with their neighbors who make up the "majority." (I know this from many years of personal experience.) They don't think highly of everyday people, and organizing "the sheeple" bores them.

        I met a guy at a "sustainability conference," who seemed to have some interesting takes on some of the technologies, and who lived in my town.  Friended him on FB.  He had cautioned me that he posted some stuff there that might offend some people, and I thought, well, OK, whatever.

        Once or twice a week either he or one of his other friends would post a comment that I thought needed a response, so I would attempt to engage in some reasoning.  I did not throw insults, though it did seem to me this crowd had been enthusiastically drinking the Tea Party Kool-Aid -- I answered what I thought was questionable logic with counterarguments and counterexamples.

        A couple weeks later, without taking serious issue with anything I had said, this fella unfriended me.

        Not that I was exactly devastated, but it showed me that a lot of these "Don't Tread On Me" tough-talkers are scared shitless to actually think about the crap they have swallowed whole from their Fox-Limbaugh telescreens.

        I think some of what I'm seeing could be characterized as a form of mental disorder, and, not being a psychiatrist, I lack the skills required to engage with people like this in a productive way.  Maybe an actual psychiatrist could conduct seminars on this -- is there one in the house? Who hasn't converted 100% to psychopharmacology?

  •  Progressive Tea Party Movement is an oxymoron (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    edrie

    BIG MISTAKE.
    You need a different name.

    •  I do have to admit (0+ / 0-)

      that seeing Brits join their own warped version of the "tea party" does make me laugh my ass off.

      Congress sat together and America's soul was healed. /me pukes

      by Beelzebud on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:39:42 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •   Can you think of a better a name? (0+ / 0-)

      It's a tax protest because the rich aren't paying their fair share of the taxes. Can you think of a better name?

      sig...You just ran into a hardcore progressive who's just another working stiff with an MBA degree & therefore a vociferous labor union supporter [smile]

      by Democrats Ramshield on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 09:21:28 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's a tough sell (0+ / 0-)

        Conservatives say the rich pay most of the income taxes but of course they can afford to pay.
        They clearly don't pay what they should based on wealth distribution.
        On top of that they are able to get the politicians to minimize their taxation so it isn't exactly theft.
        Most of their tax avoidance is legal if unethical.

        Really you'd need to rewrite the tax code to accomplish what you want and you know who writes the tax codes.

  •  Mixed issues here (0+ / 0-)

    You can't fight automation. Doing so is futile. Jobs that have been automated away will not be returning. I spend a good chunk of my time in my own job finding ways to reduce labor costs by introducing efficiency and automating away manual labor so we get a more consistent process and don't have to hire more people. Doing more with less is always a good thing, in total: our whole standard of living is based on automation!

    That being said, we definitely have to do something about the displacements this situation is creating.

    (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
    Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

    by Sparhawk on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:21:54 AM PST

    •  nonsense (0+ / 0-)

      Ever pull up to a gas station in NJ? They don't let you pump your own gas. Why? To protect the jobs of people who pump gas for a living. Pity other states weren't so forward-minded.

      In the 1950's, it was argued that TV would allow for 'new educational advances' and the expansion of education without paying for more professors and colleges. The faculty of the day shot that stupid idea full of holes and rightfully so. One of the phrases they tagged to the TV still holds true, 'the idiot box.'

      The result was the massive expansion of higher education throughout the country and the enfranchisement of the white working class into the halls of higher learning.

      Pity the faculty of the 1990's weren't so noble when faced with the next education scam brought to you by corporate America: distance/online learning. Same bad idea, same creeepy corporations wrapped in a new package.

      The result? The gutting of college faculty, billions wasted on second-class education and the hemorhaging of academic budgets across the country.

      Please don't waste my time with that fatalism. The future is ours to make, through our action or inaction.

      •  Re (0+ / 0-)

        Ever pull up to a gas station in NJ? They don't let you pump your own gas. Why? To protect the jobs of people who pump gas for a living. Pity other states weren't so forward-minded.

        Yeah, and make gas more expensive for everyone who isn't those people. The gas-pumpers don't provide a useful service. If I were in the legislature of New Jersey I would be trying to repeal that stupid law every day. People who pump gas for a living will have to go find something useful to do. That's how the economy works.

        Pity the faculty of the 1990's weren't so noble when faced with the next education scam brought to you by corporate America: distance/online learning. Same bad idea, same creeepy corporations wrapped in a new package.

        The result? The gutting of college faculty, billions wasted on second-class education and the hemorhaging of academic budgets across the country.

        Your argument is simply that distance learning doesn't work. If it doesn't work, it's a bad solution to the problem.

        If it does work, however, some educators are going to be put out of a job by it. This is a good thing (for everyone in society except for the educators in question).

        I particularly love the Khan Academy. Now I can learn about linear algebra, chemistry, etc without having to pay through the nose for the education. That's a total win for me: quality education for free instead of having to pay thousands of dollars for it.

        (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
        Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

        by Sparhawk on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 10:27:13 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  education is about more than just learning (0+ / 0-)

          "facts".

          the interaction and exchange of ideas shapes an individual as much as the solution to a complex algebraic equation.

          if your views are never challenged by those around you, then you become fixed in your opinions and never grow.

          what i dislike most about online education is that it steals from the student that immediate feedback and spontaneity from face to face interaction.  there are no meetups after class to debate the validity of an idea or issue, there are no study groups that allow the individuals to share ideas or assist someone on the wrong track.

          online learning is fine for those who have had classroom experience to further their knowledge in subjects that interest them, but as a main source of education, it falls far short.

          even the bad professor is part of the total "education" system when students outside that class gather together to discuss how and why that prof is "bad".  learning expands with more minds engaging together.

          one last point:

          when educators are "put out of business", as you say, then who determines what the "official" curriculum will be?  if it is online text, you get one vanilla, slanted, distorted opinion perpetuated ad nauseum without challenge.  is THAT education?  or is it indoctrination?

          MOVE'EM UP! ROLL'EM OUT... MOVE'EM UP RAWHIDE!!! meeeoooow! mrraaarrr!! meeeOOOOOW!

          by edrie on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 12:43:56 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Two very different issues here, I think (0+ / 0-)

            One issue is that of the two fundamental economic problems, production and distribution, the first has been solved, the second has definitely not.  The socioeconomic equation we currently base distribution on is that labor is a factor of production, so you labor, and you get credits.  You have at least some control over how much and how well you labor, so there's some semblance of equity in the system.

            Lately, technology and capital have become increasingly important factors of production, and labor less important.  So the fundamentals of our patchy, ad hoc attempt to solve the distribution problem are undermined.

            Saving labor is great from the production point of view, but the economic system as a whole does not function without consumers, the vast majority of whom are only able to be consumers as a result of trading their labor for credits.

            Suggestions from the penthouse include that the bottom 90% should die, or go into infinite debt, or just go fuck themselves once all the positions are filled for footmen, nannies, tennis pros, massage therapists and Brazilian waxers.

            Second issue is education.

            Public schooling, as currently practiced, involves a radical sensory and behavioral impoverishment, which is great if you want to create obedient armies with no annoying 'brilliance" in them.  Distance learning can greatly enhance this impoverishment.  Doesn't have to, but it makes full-spectrum human interaction unnecessary.  

            The system that distance learning is being added to, or is replacing, is one of hypnotic conditioning to accept sitting still at a desk, facing the front of the room where the power is, and ingesting facts and sloppily examined propositions as passively as a paté goose, arbitrarily switching channels -- I mean, switching subjects -- whenever a Pavlovian bell rings and what's been important for the past hour no longer is.  And after 12 years, or sixteen years, or twenty-some years of this, it's time to take your fattened brain to market.

            This path would seem to converge towards the Matrix, though I suppose there are other possible outcomes.  I'd love to know about a distance-learning situation that, for example, includes lab work for approaching how to think outside the box in which the concept of "thinking outside the box" is packed.

            You might get the impression that I'm pessimistic about that, and you'd be right.

            •  jeebus! where did YOU go to school? (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              MixedContent

              that describes nothing of my college or grad school experience - nothing at all!

              the true classroom is interactive - it is a place to go where you are challenged and challenge in return.

              i'm glad we went to separate universities.  would not have wanted your experience and i'm not sure you would have liked mine.

              location is everything - and who is teaching and how is critical.  my public school education was excellent in that i had teachers who encouraged and supported individual ideas and talents.  some teachers were great, some were awful - just like in life.

              the system now, of teaching to the test, is broken.  that is not sufficient reason to throw out the entire system.

              and as for online learning - would YOU want a heart surgeon who got his degree from the university of phoenix?

              or a psychologist? or a pharmacist?

              think not.

              MOVE'EM UP! ROLL'EM OUT... MOVE'EM UP RAWHIDE!!! meeeoooow! mrraaarrr!! meeeOOOOOW!

              by edrie on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 11:11:53 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Education vs. school structure (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                edrie

                I suspect we don't actually disagree a whole lot.

                There are indeed some teachers who work effectively against the structure, and interact with their students as actual human beings.  It's often the case, though, that good teaching can only happen through small individual acts of heroism performed when the system isn't paying attention.  Elementary school seems to be all about getting young children to sit down and shut up, for hours at a time, which is not really all that natural for children.  And the structural lessons about the nature of knowledge, and the individual's role in gaining it, are taught early.  

                I think there's progressively more freedom at the college level, and even to some degree in high school, if you're lucky.  And if you haven't already been induced to abandon your own moral and intellectual validity, you can avoid the trance of schooling.

                I definitely don't generalize from my experience, which was probably atypical, as I attended K-12 in five different states.  I had some good teachers, yes, absolutely.  I also encountered more than one well-educated idiot, who may or may not have been born as stupid as when we crossed paths.  I've talked in the past few years to parents of high school kids, and the kids too, and to teachers in the public school system.  They do what they can, and the system is not their friend.

                The lessons the system teaches by its structure are  to some degree counteracted by the good teachers, while they are reinforced by the petty tyrants who don't much like children, and for whom standardized testing is a way to oppress with less effort.

                "I am his father, Hypocraces.  I sent him to school, where he learned to stand up for a principl, and to sit down on his own stool."
                 --Firesign Theater, I Think We're All Bozos On This Bus

    •  education! we need to stop (0+ / 0-)

      teaching to outdated tests and go back to teaching students to THINK!

      our future lies in those first grades and the teachers we so undervalue in this nation.

      this is a long term problem - technology still requires people - and there are many jobs that cannot be done by technology alone - we need to have skilled trade schools available to those students who want to follow that path.

      years ago, a friend's son who was top of his class stunned everyone by turning down scholarships to college and instead going to a trade school to be a plumber.  when family and friends pleaded to know why, he smiled and answered thusly:

      "when your toilet is backed up in the middle of the night, you won't argue with me about how much it will cost to fix it!"

      within two years of graduating high school, he had paid outright for a brand new truck, never had to worry about finances and really enjoyed his work (okay, mebbe not the backed up toilet part).

      he was a young man with a vision of where he wanted to be in life and how to enjoy getting there!

      MOVE'EM UP! ROLL'EM OUT... MOVE'EM UP RAWHIDE!!! meeeoooow! mrraaarrr!! meeeOOOOOW!

      by edrie on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 12:37:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I believe the existence (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dude1701

    of the middle class is a myth.  There are those that sell their labor for a wage and those that buy labor.  That's it.  The interests of those two groups is always in conflict.  If you sell your labor for a wage you're working class.

  •  I might join a Progressive Coffee Party but NOT (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    edrie

    a Tea Party, the brand is irretrievably tainted and toxic.

    Second you would have to find a better role model than Arianna Huffington to emulate. She, in my opinion is an opportunistic grifter seeking to market her own brand and couldn't care less about Progressive politics or the poor.

    Good idea, terrible execution and shows that you, from the lofty heights of your European safety net really don't understand the American psyche anymore.

    As a dual EU/US citizen I find this attitude of Europeans toward America and Americans completely predictable.

    •  Agreed. Did everyone miss that last part? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      soccergrandmom

      A "progressive" tea party?   LOL

      If the Europeans (Brits in particular) think that the tea party is some noble populist grassroots group, then they're even more out of touch than most Americans I know.

      Congress sat together and America's soul was healed. /me pukes

      by Beelzebud on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:35:32 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  as a loyal Brit torn between two shores I have to (0+ / 0-)

        confess that the Brits just don't GET the Yanks, never have and never will.

        •  As an Irish-American with 2 passports (0+ / 0-)

          Anglo-American policies usually look like two sides of the same coin.

          And as someone with strong sympathies for the goals of Irish Republicanism (though not the violence), everyone should take notice when I'm found siding with the Brits.

          The author is stone-correct. Indeed, his distance from the US means he misses the fury we feel toward Democratic leadership for betraying us in the worst economic depression since the Great one.

          The last election was a fucking disaster for this party. Obama's right-wing turn since then heralds a worse disaster in 2 years. If morality is a failing argument, basic political commonsense should be sufficient to warrant a return to New Deal economics and this neoliberal bullshit tossed in the trash. Its shit economics and fucking suicidal politics.

        •  er, as a "yank" (even though born in n.c.) (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          soccergrandmom

          from a long long family tree on these shores (mom's side, 1735, dad's 1737), i can assure you that
          even I don't "get" the "yanks"!

          amazing how really naive americans are - my theory is that those who have never traveled outside the boundaries of this country are stuck in a time warp.

          300 years of history for this nation pales when standing in roman ruins in germany or at stonehenge.  we have no real sense of how vast "history" really is because our nation is so young.

          i loved travelling europe and seeing how advanced so many civilizations were in the roman days - the scythian times, etc.

          i can only imagine china - and hope to travel there one day to feel that nation's "history", too - and south america!

          we are children in america - so short a time as an "organized entity", yet we try to tell so many other nations how to "fix" their problems that have existed centuries before this land was inhabited by those european invaders.

          we even dismiss the "history" of the native american people here - they have "owned" this land for so much longer than "we (the european descendants)" have.  and because of those brief 300+ years, we try to tell the hispanics, the blacks, the "others" that they don't "belong" here?

          naive AND arrogant, i'm afraid.  so, if you don't understand us, it is understandable because many of US don't understand us, either!

          MOVE'EM UP! ROLL'EM OUT... MOVE'EM UP RAWHIDE!!! meeeoooow! mrraaarrr!! meeeOOOOOW!

          by edrie on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 12:51:06 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  arianna and jane - birds of a feather, imho! nt (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      soccergrandmom

      MOVE'EM UP! ROLL'EM OUT... MOVE'EM UP RAWHIDE!!! meeeoooow! mrraaarrr!! meeeOOOOOW!

      by edrie on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 12:44:29 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Someone who left is going to ask me when (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jennifer poole, Matt Z

    we stand and fight?

    Get real.

    Congress sat together and America's soul was healed. /me pukes

    by Beelzebud on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 08:26:10 AM PST

  •  It may be implied, but you forgot trade policies. (0+ / 0-)

    Through corporate-designed trade policies, corporations have forced American workers to compete against workers in low-wage countries.

  •  You make good points, DemR. Rifkin does not. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, Kickemout, Dude1701

    Jeremey Rifkin is a neo-Luddite who never met a problem he couldn't blame on technology.  Advances in technology created at least as many jobs as they eliminated. And if only American workers had reaped a fair share of the results of their increased productivity, the middle class would have advanced economically over the last three decades, rather than falling back.

    Deliberate political policy, not technology, led to the concentration of wealth in the upper 1%.  Politics, not technology, led to the crushing of the union workforce.  Political choices, not technology, were the key factors in outsourcing and offshoring.  (I'll grant that offshoring would be difficult-to-impossible without the internet, but to you really want to give up the net to control offshoring?) Europe and Japan managed to make at least as much use of technological advances as the US, while maintaining a social safety net.

    I've followed Rifkin since he first made a name for himself 30+ years ago by trying to outlaw ALL biotechnology that involved the manipulation of ANY organism's DNA, even for scientific or medical research.  If he had had his way, hundreds of thousands of people who are now alive and reasonably healthy would have been dead or crippled. (I'm one of them.)

    If he's ever admitted his error on this, I've never heard of it.  He is contemptible.

    •  Yeah, but where are they created? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MixedContent

      Technology is ambivalent, like a gun. How its used, to what purpose and whether the knock-on impacts are fully calculated determines its worth to society.

      Under the current economic structures, we may do the innovation, but the production jobs will be in some country with cheap labor and lax environmental laws and the profits will be counted in a country with lax banking rules and low taxes.

      Obama's 'competitiveness' plan is bullshit without addressing these problems and everyone in the cheap seats sees that.

      The usual suspects will be the beneficiaries and life will get worse for the rest of us. As with all his other decisions, they benefit only the banks, Wall Street and his favored corporate patrons.

      This is not the change I voted for. It is EXACTLY what I thought I was voting against.

      And I will be voting against this shit in 2 years, if Obama doesn't discover his 'inner Roosevelt' really fucking fast.  

  •  It will happen eventually (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mrs M, Tom Taaffe

    But it will have to get worse before it gets better.
    The folks in Tunisia and Eqypt have been oppressed for decades folks. Rioting in the streets is not a big party, it's not something that people take to lightly. You're not too likely to take part in such activities unless you are truly desperate.
    Things got that desperate here during the depression. Armed mobs started greeting sheriffs and bankers attempting to foreclose on farms. Bankers were hauled out of their homes and tarred and feathered. Bank robbers, even vicious killers who took many innocent lives, were treated as heros because the banks were so hated. FDR genuinely feared revolution was a possibility when he initiated the New Deal.
    When the social safety net is eviscerated even more than it has been, when millions of formerly middle class folks find themselves homeless and hungry, then people will demand change, but probably not before.
    I'd love to be wrong about this. There are steps we could take to help lessen the power of the big banks for example by taking our money out of them, and start living more simply by not buying cheap crap built overseas just because you have to have the latest new "must have" gadget. These steps might help, but in the end I truly fear that we are headed for a downward trend for some time until enough people are finally desperate enough that violence will become tolerable.
    Who knows what the triggering event will be? In Tunisia it was a suicide. Perhaps here it will be some poor bastard who has been screwed out of his home by Wells Fargo or B of A and decides to blow himself up in their corporate offices. Eventually however, it will get bad enough for enough folks, and the shit will hit the fan.

    •  I agree, but its not going to happen (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fat old man, MixedContent

      so long as Obama's cabinet looks like a Goldman Sachs who's who.

      He's not working for us, he's using us.

      And things will continue to get worse, so long as we follow Obama to our ruin, collectively, economically and politically. If the immorality of throwing the bottom 40% under a bus for the benefit of the bankers and wall street, is not sufficient to warrant opposition, then the suicidal political outcomes of his policies should make every elected Democrat pay attention.

      Otherwise, the last election was simply a dress rehearsal.

      •  Well, perhaps (0+ / 0-)

        I don't think it will happen for a few more years at least, but who's in the White House seems irrelevant to me. The tipping point will be reached when a critical mass of desperate people is reached. The more corporate friendly the gov. becomes, the worse things get for the common citizen, the faster it will happen.
        Neither party stands for ordinary citizens at the moment, so I think it could happen with Obama in power, if things get bad enough.

  •  Grammar note: "rather THAN" not "rather then" (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mrs M
    Great graphic, bad word. "Than" is a comparative, "then" is a time signifier.

    Not a comment on your post, which I haven't read in it entirety yet. But I read enough to know that you've got something important to say, and you don't want the graphic representing your opinion to make people question the worth of your words.

    The future is all around us, waiting in moments of transition, to be born in moments of revelation. --G'Kar, "Z'ha'dum" Babylon 5

    by KarenJG on Sun Jan 30, 2011 at 11:11:06 AM PST

    •  To KarenJG -Thanks for your post and for the help (0+ / 0-)

      sig...You just ran into a hardcore progressive who's just another working stiff with an MBA degree & therefore a vociferous labor union supporter [smile]

      by Democrats Ramshield on Tue Feb 01, 2011 at 05:16:23 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

Meteor Blades, PeWi, claude, Thumb, Lupin, Ed in Montana, tmo, Athena, PrahaPartizan, nolalily, teacherken, mimi, theboz, emal, tommurphy, Pescadero Bill, Wintermute, billlaurelMD, Mnemosyne, route66, frisco, RFK Lives, expatjourno, TracieLynn, leveymg, nyceve, barath, Fe, Cedwyn, Melanchthon, DeadB0y, pat bunny, peternight, churchylafemme, dkmich, Bendra, zerelda, Kitsap River, Hillbilly Dem, Deward Hastings, TexasLefty, vacantlook, Armand451, schroeder, Julie Gulden, davidincleveland, marina, radarlady, 3goldens, salmo, NoMoreLies, SherwoodB, OpherGopher, irate, Philoguy, offred, panicbean, reflectionsv37, SaraBeth, jimstaro, GreyHawk, Bob B, Lisa Lockwood, deepsouthdoug, Pluto, Cory Bantic, Rogneid, JanL, tarheelblue, vigilant meerkat, kestrel9000, compbear, arlene, MJ via Chicago, global citizen, Art Garfarkle, Frank Cocozzelli, soccergrandmom, blue in NC, a small quiet voice, Dreaming of Better Days, The House, Pandoras Box, bigchin, One Pissed Off Liberal, pgm 01, camlbacker, HeartlandLiberal, Jimdotz, ilex, joyful, daphnepf, artisan, SeaTurtle, fayeforcure, bkamr, Steve15, scooter in brooklyn, Fossil, OutCarolineStreet, rssrai, Tam in CA, S C B, banger, phrogge prince, sagansong, rodentrancher, statsone, aufklaerer, output, Nebraskablue, h bridges, EquationDoc, DefendOurConstitution, zaka1, Losty, ohmyheck, Tommymac, Larsstephens, Words In Action, awcomeon, p gorden lippy, amk for obama, Benintn, Jaimas, jazzbuff, Oh Mary Oh, slice, angstall, nicethugbert, croyal, BlackQueen40, QuestionAuthority, cama2008, laurnj, Wolf10, RadicalRoadRat, dle2GA, TRPChicago, poliwrangler, beforedawn, Sedro, Miggles, SoCalSal, Just Call Me Jay, Azazello, Rejoinder, Dom9000, sciphile, BlueDragon, tinhut, Free Chicken and Beer, bluebottles, daysey, Defiler, Tom Taaffe, damfino, Williston Barrett, molecularlevel, Mostel26, AnnieR, swampyankee, Forward is D not R, supercereal, MartyM, lunachickie, wxorknot, Julie Waters

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site