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New York University School of Law's Brennan Center for Justice released a new study Monday detailing how widespread voter suppression has become as Republicans took over statehouses across the nation.

Here's the breakdown of those five million potentially disenfranchised citizens (from the report overview [PDF]).

  1. 3.2 million voters affected by new photo ID laws. New photo ID laws for voting will be in effect for the 2012 election in five states (Kansas, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Wisconsin), which have a combined citizen voting age population of just under 29 million. 3.2 million (11 percent) of those potential voters do not have state-issued photo ID. Rhode Island voters are excluded from this count, because Rhode Island’s new law’s requirements are significantly less onerous than those in the other states.
  2. 240,000 additional citizens and potential voters affected by new proof of citizenship laws. New proof of citizenship laws will be in effect in three states (Alabama, Kansas, Tennessee), two of which will also have new photo ID laws. Assuming conservatively that those without proof of citizenship overlap substantially with those without state-issued photo ID, we excluded those two states. The citizen voting age population in the remaining state (Alabama) is 3.43 million; 240,000 (7 percent) of those potential voters do not have documentary proof of citizenship.
  3. 202,000 voters registered in 2008 through voter registration drives that have now been made extremely difficult or impossible under new laws. Two states (Florida and Texas) passed laws restricting voter registration drives, causing all or most of those drives to stop. In 2008, 2.13 million voters registered in Florida and, very conservatively, at least 8.24 percent or 176,000 of them did so through drives. At least 501,000 voters registered in Texas, and at least 5.13 percent or 26,000 of them did so via drives.
  4. 60,000 voters registered in 2008 through Election Day voter registration where it has now been repealed. Maine abolished Election Day registration. In 2008, 60,000 Maine citizens registered and voted on Election Day.
  5. One to two million voters who voted in 2008 on days eliminated under new laws rolling back early voting. The early voting period was cut by half or more in three states (Florida, Georgia and Ohio). In 2008, nearly 8 million Americans voted early in these states. An estimated 1 to 2 million voted on days eliminated by these new laws.
  6. At least 100,000 disenfranchised citizens who might have regained voting rights by 2012. Two states (Florida and Iowa) made it substantially more difficult or impossible for people with past felony convictions to get their voting rights restored. Up to one million people in Florida could have benefited from the prior practice; based on the rates of restoration in Florida under the prior policy, 100,000 citizens likely would have gotten their rights restored by 2012. Other voting restrictions passed this year that are not included in this estimate.

These are just the laws passed so far. As many as 34 states have introduced legislation in the last 2 years to require government-issued photo identification to vote. At least 12 have introduced legislation requiring proof of citizenship, such as a birth certificate, to register to vote. As many as 13 states have introduced legislation ending same-day registration and limiting voter registration drives like those traditionally done by the League of Women Voters. At least nine states have introduced legislation to shorten early voting periods and four have tried to limit absentee voting.

The potential outcome of taking five million votes out of the mix in 2012? It could be the presidency, according to the Brennan Center.

  • The states that have already cut back on voting rights will provide 171 electoral votes in 2012 – 63 percent of the 270 needed to win the presidency.
  • Of the 12 likely battleground states, as assessed by an August Los Angeles Times analysis of Gallup polling, five have already cut back on voting rights (and may pass additional restrictive legislation), and two more are currently considering new restrictions.

And you know, of course, who is being disenfranchised: "young, minority, and low-income voters, as well as on voters with disabilities." In other words, people who generally vote Democratic. Which means it's a no-brainer that much of the legislation introduced and passed around the country is the work of ALEC, American Legislative Exchange Council, the Koch brother's toy for taking over the country.

Originally posted to Joan McCarter on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 10:45 AM PDT.

Also republished by Exposing ALEC, ClassWarfare Newsletter: WallStreet VS Working Class Global Occupy movement, and Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  BREAKING!!!!!!!!!! (9+ / 0-)

    Republicans hate Democracy.

    I was Rambo in the disco/ I was shootin' to the beat/ When they burned me in effigy My vacation was complete. Neil Young

    by Mike S on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 10:53:37 AM PDT

  •  I did my diary on NY Times story (12+ / 0-)

    about the report from Brennan Center.  The diary is titled suppressing 5 million votes - and this is a democracy?

    "what the best and wisest parent wants for his child is what we should want for all the children of the community" - John Dewey

    by teacherken on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 10:54:32 AM PDT

  •  Republicans bring back Jim Crow laws (7+ / 0-)

    in  a 21st century disguise.

    "Here is my principle: Taxes shall be levied according to ability to pay. That is the only American principle." Franklin D. Roosevelt

    by bear83 on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 10:57:41 AM PDT

    •  Yup, instead of calling it "poll tax" it's now (7+ / 0-)

      "Fee for getting your voter ID card". You see, everything is OK when it's a "fee" instead of a "tax". Gee, aren't they clever?

      GOP 2012 -- Austerity is just around the corner!

      by ontheleftcoast on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:36:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Legally, they can't charge for ID required to vote (7+ / 0-)

        Which means we should be pointing out to the 'baggers and everyone else that the states that have enacted these laws will now have to budget millions of dollars to produce new photo IDs for all the citizens who need them.  

        Many states do offer photo ID cards that are basically drivers licence-type IDs for non-drivers, and they charge for them.  But when the photo ID is required for voting, they can't do so.  So that means that they've actually cut off a revenue stream, at the same time as they increase the need for the item.  They are geniuses, are they not?  

        It would be a pity if they have to raise taxes to pay for these unnecessary and discriminatory new laws.  My heart would break for those poor, put upon teabagger taxpayers.

        Stupid fucks.

      •  Here's what a right wing blogger said about "fee" (4+ / 0-)

        for voter ID for the poor.

        She said that those who can't afford it could collect cans.

        Seriously.

    •  They reverse American progress (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Judge Moonbox, bear83, maryru, Matt Z

      In 1787, when the Constitution was adopted, there was limited white male suffrage limited to white males who owned a certain amount of property - it varied from state to state.

      By the 1840's all states but South Carolina had universal white male suffrage.

      Then after the Civil War and the 15th amendment we extended the suffrage to black males and former male slaves.  That progress was reversed in the South after the Compromise of 1876 but not in the North.

      Then in 1920 came the 19th amendment extending the vote to women.

      Then came the Civil Rights Movement culminating in the Voting Rights Act of 1965 - restoring the vote to Southern blacks.

      Then came the 26th Amendment in 1971 extending the vote to all Americans 18 years of age and older.

      The John Birch Society had a motto - "This is a Republic, not a Democracy."  When I was a teen in the 1960's, I puzzled over what this meant.  Now I understand.

      "We have always known that heedless self-interest was bad morals, now we know that it is bad economics." Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jan. 20, 1937

      by Navy Vet Terp on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:44:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  We need to push hard on this (15+ / 0-)

    As do Democratic politicians. Hard.

    My forthcoming book Obama's America: A Transformative Vision of Our National Identity will be published in Summer 2012 by Potomac Books.

    by Ian Reifowitz on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 10:58:05 AM PDT

  •  I'm confused (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    blue aardvark

    by that map -- re: CT -- we don't have a picture ID requirement -- you can use the last 4 digits of your SS# if you have no other ID for registration.  You can use a utility bill when voting -- although, I've not had to provide anything since I vote every election and everyone knows me.

    We also have a Democratic majority in both Chambers and the Governorship so how helpful is this map?

    Other than that -- it is time to organize in the affected States to get folks registered, which might include volunteering for driving.  GOTV works best when you have registered voters.

    Vi er alle norske " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

    by gchaucer2 on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 11:04:46 AM PDT

    •  The states in red with no symbols are states where (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gchaucer2, lgmcp, Judge Moonbox, Matt Z

      legislation has been introduced not passed. In most cases the legislation will probably not go anywhere, especially in states dominated by Dems.

      If there is no accountability for those who authorized torture, we can no longer say that we are a nation of laws, not men.

      by MikePhoenix on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:39:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Maybe the ID (0+ / 0-)

        requirement is pointing at RI instead of CT.  In any case, legislation re: voter ID in CT will have zero chance now and even under a Republican governor or one chamber it wouldn't have a chance in this State.

        Vi er alle norske " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

        by gchaucer2 on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:58:44 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  And that's not even considering (4+ / 0-)

    the former felon disenfranchisement laws, which are the root of the evil.

    National Democrats have ignored the former felon disenfranchisement laws.  In part out of indifference, in part out of it being not that popular, in part because they agree with them.  But these abuses are going to continue to sprout from this root until Democrats are hurt enough by them to act.

    I used to think that Florida in 2000 was enough of a lesson, but obviously it wasn't.

    •  No, willingness to disenfranchise ANYONE (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Judge Moonbox, Matt Z

      is the root of the evil.  

      Making reinstatement difficult or impossible for those with felony records, is by no means the root, it is only one small branch.  

      Disenfranchisement of law-abiding voters because of tiny registration discrepancies  between address databases, for instance, is a much larger and even more heinous branch.   And there are many others.

      Disrespect for allowing each and every citizen the opportunity to vote, for petty partisan advantage,  is the root of the evil.   It is much larger than the issue of restoring felon's votes.  

      "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

      by lgmcp on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 05:06:30 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Question about GA 2008 Senate race. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Matt Z

        I have to wonder about the race between incumbent Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R) and challenger Jim Martin (D). Chambliss won by 110,000 votes out of 2.6 million cast. (I couldn't find if that was the Election Day total or the runoff.) Also, Ga had instituted a Photo ID requirement that year. That leads me to wonder, how many votes did the Photo ID requirement deprive Martin of? If the Supreme Court had decided to disallow the bills, would Chambliss had still won?

        Greg McKendry, Linda Kraeger, Dr. George Tiller, Steven Johns. Victims of Wingnut violence

        by Judge Moonbox on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 06:40:10 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Good question. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Matt Z, Judge Moonbox

          They say most races are won in the margins.  Even if relatively few voters find the photoID onerous, that few can matter, very much.  And they do tend to be ours, more than not ... hence the efforts.

          "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

          by lgmcp on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 08:59:40 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  "Heartaches by the Number" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    defluxion10, Judge Moonbox

    Yes, I love those who call themselves Liberal, or Progressive.  We are on a path that will replace heartache with joy.  I've made room for my conservative friends.

  •  this to me is our #1 issue (5+ / 0-)

    this voter disenfranchisement must be stopped and reversed. No one should be impeded from voting - no one - ever.

    •  Until we can get legislative majorities and (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lgmcp, Mr Rick

      Governorships in the states in question, our best bet is to educate voters on how to get the ID they need.

      If there is no accountability for those who authorized torture, we can no longer say that we are a nation of laws, not men.

      by MikePhoenix on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:42:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Many Great Lake States have had (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        apimomfan2, Ohiodem1, Matt Z

        Republican Governors and Republican majorities in their Statehouses since 2000...We now have at least 20 years of GOP redistricting baked into the cake at the state level in this area.

        When you look at what's been going on over the past year in states like Wisconsin, Minn., Ohio and Michigan...we are facing a serious threat here of losing one of the three legs of Democratic regional strongholds.  The West and East Coasts cannot carry the day in national elections...we need this region.

        In light of that, I can't for the life of me understand the decision of the Michigan Dem Party to assist with recall efforts in Wisconsin, but sit on their hands for the same efforts in their own state.  That has to be demoralizing for Michigan Dems on the street.

        Can our Michigan Kossacks chime in here and give me a sense of how you see 2012 lining up?  If Romney wins the GOP nomination, how do you think the state votes next year?

        "In a nation ruled by swine, all pigs are upwardly mobile." Hunter S. Thompson

        by Keith930 on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:59:59 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I think the last time Democrats had the majority (0+ / 0-)

          for redistricting Ohio was 1980, and possibly 1970, but not both.

          The R's in Ohio know when they need to win elections and go all out to control the mapping.

          I agree that if Michigan's Democratic Party did not participate in gathering signatures to recall Snyder, then they failed their membership.  From what I read, the signature gathering was a total grass roots effort that only had about $50 k and they still gathered 800,000 signatures.  With just a little bit of help from the party, and possibly some unions, enough signaures would have been gathered.  How sad for Michigan, which has one of the worst radical repubican problems, particularly the Emergency Managers or as I like to call them unelected dictators.

          Republicans are like alligators. All mouth and no ears.

          by Ohiodem1 on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 07:49:53 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  I think a bigger problem is voter apathy (0+ / 0-)
  •  Had Democrats cared about state legislatures (7+ / 0-)

    and governorships in 2010, we wouldnt be having this problem.  This "win the White House" and nothing else strategy is killing Democrats.  

    •  In Ohio, thanks to repeated and worsening (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      defluxion10, apimomfan2

      Republican gerrymandering, it is virtually impossible to win a Democratic majority in the legislature.  That situation was made much worse with the take no prisoners, get on the bus or get run over attitude of the 2010 crop of Republicans led by our corporate tool Governor Kaisch.  The only hope of stopping the Republican steamroller will be to elect a Democratic governor paired with the miraculous reappearance of a few rational Republicans.

      “when Democrats don’t vote, Democrats don’t win.” Alan Grayson

      by ahumbleopinion on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:46:29 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Yes we would have (0+ / 0-)

      because of the economy. Yes we need Howard Dean back (or at least IMNSHO), but 2010 was going to be hard going for the Democrats no matter what, especially in the South.

  •  So when do all these laws (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    defluxion10, apimomfan2, raincrow, Matt Z

    lead to the introduction of the National ID Card, in the interests of "standardization"? You know that's on the Right wing radar...

    Now to try to end the wars we ask our gay and straight soldiers to fight. -- Chris Hayes

    by Cali Scribe on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:34:45 PM PDT

    •  You mean, (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      raincrow

      "the mark of the Beast"?!    

      I don't think people who can't even handle the idea of census-takers coming to their door, will be too cool with a national ID card.  

      "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

      by lgmcp on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 05:07:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  You mean the whole "Mark of The Beast" thing that (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      apimomfan2, raincrow, Matt Z

      freaks out the Republican Rightwingnuts so much,I'm surprised that there are any Republican Voters in these States since they need an almost a literal "Mark of The Beast"ID to vote.

  •  They are terrified of the people (8+ / 0-)

    Absolutely terrified.

    In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; but in practice, there always is a difference. - Yogi Berra

    by blue aardvark on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:35:19 PM PDT

  •  But wait, it gets worse (11+ / 0-)

    the Texas Voter ID law specifically exempts one photo ID from eligibility, the Veteran's Administration ID. Yes, among the groups that the Republicans don't want to vote are Veterans.

    "If I pay a man enough money to buy my car, he'll buy my car." Henry Ford

    by johnmorris on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:35:34 PM PDT

  •  Note that fascists like Kris "KKK" Kolbach (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    apimomfan2

    are oozing into the offices of Secretary of State, with the objective of voter suppression.

    You have exactly 10 seconds to change that look of disgusting pity into one of enormous respect!

    by Cartoon Peril on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:36:54 PM PDT

  •  love if it hurt the republcians votes instead (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    defluxion10, apimomfan2

    Democrats. Are those states asking proof for citizenship is that at the polls or when they register to vote? Are those states going to ask everyone to prove their citizenship or just those who look Hispanic.

  •  youneed photo ID for so many things (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    licorice114

    why wouldn't someone have one?

    •  Why would people who don't drive and (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      David Kaib, apimomfan2, raincrow, Matt Z

      don't travel and live in a cash economy need a photo ID?

      “when Democrats don’t vote, Democrats don’t win.” Alan Grayson

      by ahumbleopinion on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:49:07 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  bernbart, I have long answer for you (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Matt Z, David Kaib

      but will keep this short: there's a significant population of people, maybe like 10% of us in America, who live a very different kind of life than middle class folks.  The "everyone has a license or ID" just isn't true, and the cost of assembling the documents like original birth certificates, etc. in order to get an ID can be considerable for folks with no income.  The process also usually requires either internet connections, faxes, phones, transportation to offices, or all of the above.  This is not easy for a lot of people, and totally impossible for some.  And oh yeah, a stable mailing address - not everyone has a home or a utility bill.

      And the idea that "everyone needs ID for so many things" is also not true for this segment of our citizenry.  They don't rent cars or get on airplanes or open bank accounts. If it requires an ID, they do without.

      They are still US citizens and should have the right to vote.

      I only know all of this becausee I've worked with people who are desperately poor, homeless, etc.  They are pretty much invisible to most of us, and these types of laws ensure they will be kept on the amrgins, without a voice.  the discards of capitalism.

      Please do not buy into these lies of "Fraud".  People trying to vote are not committing fraud. They're trying to be responsible citizens.  thanks

  •  Liberals... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    defluxion10, Matt Z

    ..need to start pointing out to Republicans that these anti-Democracy voting laws are going to hurt Republicans as much the intended target.

    You can't tell me the typical uneducated teabagger has all their shit in order when it comes to sniffing out voting trickery.

    A teabagger is going to get just as screwed by doing away with early voting as any Democrat.

    Demanding 5 different types of I.D. & a birth certificate...right.  The typical teabagger is on top of all this shit.  

    Playing musical chairs with voting precincts & spreading lies about which day to vote.  Don't worry, our highly sophisticated & street smart teabaggers will be immune to these antics.  Only the idiot liberals will fall for them.

    Instead of liberals freaking out over all these fascist attempts to quell voting, liberals should be enlightening the Republican party that their highly gullible & dumber than dirt demographic is going to be just as affected by this nonsense as liberals.

    When Fascism comes to America it will be wrapped in excess body fat and carrying a misspelled sign.

    by wyvern on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:40:20 PM PDT

  •  Idaho requires voter id too. link below (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raincrow
  •  This is why OccupyWallStreet is so important (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    beltane, apimomfan2, raincrow, Matt Z

    right now.  We need to shine a light on the plutocrats who are destroying our democracy.

  •  After Bush v. Gore, The F'ing LAME Ass Dim-0-Crap (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    apimomfan2

    Party should have put a NATIONAL voting procedure law as priority #1

    instead of helping GWB pass his goddam tax cuts in 2001,

    or passing his great war on terror,

    or passing an unfunded NCLB,

    or passing Medicare Part D PHARMA Welfare,

    or rubber stamping his appointments,

    or taking impeachment off the table,

    or ... or ... or ...

    at least the repukes are doing THEIR jobs - screwing the bottom 99% of us every which way possible --

    WTF job are our diaper pissers doing right, other than keeping fat paychecks to LOSE?

    rmm.

    Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look; He thinks too much: such men are dangerous

    by seabos84 on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:46:40 PM PDT

  •  I wonder whether there are efforts... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raincrow

    ...to overturn these laws in the courts. I sure hope there are strong efforts not just to overturn these laws, but to resist them by registering the very voters Republicans don't want to vote-- the young, the poor, those who don't look like or think like them, etc...

    Friends don't let friends vote Republican.

    by alaprst on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:48:11 PM PDT

  •  I don't know why (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    apimomfan2, Matt Z

    they just don't come out and make it illegal for all democrats to vote.  

    I see the secretary of state in one place has made it illegal to send soldiers overseas who come from democratic districts in his state a ballot for the upcoming elections!!!!!
    HE'S MADE IT ILLEGAL FOR SOLDIERS WHO ARE FIGHTING FOR THIS COUNTRY TO VOTE BECAUSE THEY COME FROM DEMOCRATIC DISTRICTS!!!

    this is republicans idea of democracy.

  •  Good news in OH though (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    acnetj, raincrow, maryru, Juliann, Matt Z

    thanks to over 300,000 signatures turned in to the Sec. of State last week, there will be a ballot issue in Nov. 2012 to repeal the Republican voter-suppression law--moreover, the changes under that law are nullified until that vote is held.

    That means that, as in 2008, there will be over one month of early voting and even the so-called "golden week," a one week period in early October where people can register and vote on the same day, will make a reappearance.

    Something like 45% of Ohio voters voted early in 2008. Republicans hate it when people vote.

  •  The Federal Government had to inforce the (4+ / 0-)

    Civil Rights Act.  The Federal Government has to inforce the Voting Rights Act NOW.

    Best. President. Ever.

    by Little Lulu on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:51:23 PM PDT

  •  Koch brothers (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    apimomfan2
    as Republicans took over statehouses across the nation.

    That should be "as Koch brothers took over statehouses across the nation"

    "Corruptio Optimi Pessima" (Corruption of the best is the worst)

    by zenox on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:57:35 PM PDT

  •  Legislation "introduced" (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    brooklyns finest

    isn't a very meaningful metric.  They can "introduce" a bill to impose the death sentence on any woman who has an abortion (not to give them any new ideas or anything).  Until it is passed and signed, it only takes one whackadoo state legislator to put it forward as their wish list.

    The other symbols are much more meaningful and important.  

    "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

    by lgmcp on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 04:59:42 PM PDT

  •  Protest ALEC in Phoenix (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raincrow, Bob Sloan

    ALEC, the group that has been coordinating the passage of these voter ID laws, will be having their "States & Nation" meeting in Phoenix this year.  On Thursday, December 1st, there is going to be a demonstration put on by the Protest ALEC organization with the support of local community groups.

    If you are in the southwest, please think about coming out to show your support for the fight against this group and the bad policies that they've been pushing.

    http://www.economicpopulist.org

    by ManfromMiddletown on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 05:00:31 PM PDT

  •  Hand count ballots (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raincrow

    Voter ID's are the start, but situations like the Kloppenburg Supreme Court race in WI followed by the odd winning of Alberta Darling (R) over Sandy Pasch (D) demonstrates that Republicans are not to be trusted.  The only way to preserve democracy is to allow citizens to vote and to count their votes fairly.  Princeton University and good research on the methods used to corrupt elections.  Campaigning and getting voters to the polls means nothing if the final tally is edited to the favor of one party or the other.
    We need to hand count ballots, too.  

  •  I do have Two big questions why isn't any groups (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raincrow

    and The Democratic Party making damn sure that people do meet these unjust and treasonous Requirements,starting like now and not the Summer of '12 ? and Why isn't President Obama making this a big news Item by giving a Prime-time Speech on the Laws keeping people from Voting?

  •  OK, I'm freaked. What can be done? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raincrow, Matt Z

    Anybody?

    Winning elections is great, but building movements is better.

    by Alvin K on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 05:01:27 PM PDT

    •  Volunteer as a pollworker or pollwatcher (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Albino 4 Obama 08, Juliann, Matt Z

      on election day. ( I do.  I use a day of vacation leave.)  And participate in conducting voter registration drives, starting NOW.   Lots of groups have them.  League of Women Voters, for instance.

      "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

      by lgmcp on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 05:12:26 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  We need to do far more than that (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Matt Z, lgmcp

        We need to get into communities where people are being disenfranchised and help them get the documentation they need. Then we need to be there if they need a ride to the polls, especially where people are forced to drive long distances to cast early ballots.

        We need to encourage and facilitate early voting because you KNOW how many mysterious voting machine failures will crop up on that first November Tuesday.

        •  All excellent points of attack (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Juliann, Matt Z, raincrow

          Proof of identity for voting, is a moot point if you never registered.  Proof and registration, are moot if you don't get there.  Proof, registration, AND getting there, are moot if your vote isn't tallied.  

          It's a long and fragile chain that can be severed at any point.  

          My proposal for the tally issue, is not hand counts of every precinct of every race as some still call for:  it is mandatory, FUNDED recounts of some small percentage of RANDOM precincts in EVERY race, EVERY time.   Because you can't vouch for the quality, of something you don't f'n bother to measure.  

          "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

          by lgmcp on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 09:06:39 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Need an incentive to vote, go read THEBLAZE (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z

    If you want to see what is in the minds of the radical right, go to the web site THEBLAZE. Read the articles and the posts that should give you enough incentive to vote and encourage others to vote.

  •  What all this suppression... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    apimomfan2, Matt Z

    ...means is unless the rethugs cheat they would rarely win anything.

    Rick Perry and Michele Bachmann don't accept evolution because they haven't been part of the process. {-8.25 / -5.64}

    by carver on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 05:13:41 PM PDT

  •  Hey. Election reform. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    apimomfan2, Matt Z

    Seems like that would have been a good initiative for Democrats to push back in '09.

    "[President Obama] is right. Peace is hard. Unlike winning the Nobel Peace Price which is surprisingly easy." -- Stephen Colbert

    by just some lurker guy on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 05:16:07 PM PDT

  •  So what is the Democratic position here? (0+ / 0-)

    That we have the right level of disenfranchisement without these laws? Of that we should be eliminating all barriers to the right to vote? Democrats control some states. Are there any bills to move in the other direction?

    Politics is the art of the possible, but that means you have to think about changing what is possible, not that you have to accept it in perpetuity.

    by David Kaib on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 05:22:02 PM PDT

  •  Indiana status? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ironheel

    I'm vote in Indiana and in the past elections I have been carded for an ID. Most recent being the '10 elections. I thought they had the law on the books here as well.

    •  Update, for Indiana this is OLD news (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ironheel

      Our Courts upheld the local laws back in '08.

      So for us this is old news. Voter suppression is pretty strong here.

      •  All aboard the hate train, but (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        licorice114

        I'm Latino and disabled, two groups that are supposedly impacted by these ID laws, but I've held either a State-issued ID card (age 18-30) or Operator's (driver's) license age 30-present).  

        Why is it seen as an article of faith that getting an ID is so hard?  I'm pretty poor, but I've managed to ensure that I've had positive ID, either to confirm my identity or to verify my privilege to drive, or both.

        Maybe I'm heartless; help me out here.

        Progressive Gearhead--supercharge change!

        by Albino 4 Obama 08 on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 06:08:08 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  A4O08 (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          David Kaib

          Glad things have worked out for you.  But the data you cite is based on a larger sample than just one person, and overall those 2 groups of people are more likely to not have IDS than other groups.

          The larger question is: what harm is being prevented by these laws?  The factual answer, so far, is pretty much nothing.  There is real harm done to people who are as lucky as you in having a license and ID.

          I don't think you're heartless, but restricting one of the fundamental rights of our democracy should only be done for the most serious, proven reasons - and not just because it doesn't affect you personally.

          That would be like me saying I'm a woman but since my workplace pays me the same as men, I don't support equal pay for equal work legislation.

      •  We're the laboratory (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Albino 4 Obama 08

        for a bunch of the wingnut legislation.

        Mitch Daniels dissolved public bargaining for government employees his first day in office, in 2004.

        We've increased regressive sales taxes while capping property taxes.

        We've seen a drastic increase in county-level restrictions on women's health clinics, especially those that provide abortions. And that was before the anti-Planned Parenthood law passed this last session.

        Don't forget that RNC member and Citizens United lawyer James Bopp is a Hoosier, and helps push a lot of these initiatives.

        All 50 states deserve democracy.

        by ironheel on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 06:19:16 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  and that's the tip of the Mitch iceberg (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          drmah

          Can't forget the failed "modernization" of the Family and Social Services Administration, a plan that was cynically designed to fail from concept to implementation, only serving to frustrate the most vulnerable Hoosiers from merely applying for public benefits.  Talk about suppression!

          The Daniels admin will go down as one of the most ethically-challenged in modern Indiana history, but thanks to the sycophants in the Indy-area media, no one will ever know about the egregious enrichment of his friends and supporters.
          Yeah, I'm looking at YOU, Jim Shella, et al!

          Progressive Gearhead--supercharge change!

          by Albino 4 Obama 08 on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 06:28:12 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  The real danger of Mitch's iceberg lies in VP (0+ / 0-)

            vision. Daniels has successfuly flown under the radar as an outrageous Right-wing govenor, but is indeed

            :The most etihically-challenged in Indiana history....

            Daniels still masqerades as a Republican Middle-of-the-roader, so may get an invitation for VP as a token appeal to more moderate Republicans.  Daniels is anything but Moderate in real life.  Watch out for this snake-in-the-grass.
  •  I don't ever want to see California in red (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    EducatetheMasses, Matt Z

    OK. Some Republican yahoo dropped a proposed bill in the box to disenfranchise voters. This bill will most likely get tossed in the garbage because Repubs hold about 40% of the legislature (maybe less). And for that I have to look at a red California? The horror.

    CROUCH!...TOUCH!...PAUSE!...Engage!

    by bobinson on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 05:27:15 PM PDT

  •  Amazing things that a desparate party (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z

    will do isn't it? Obama knows about this and what they are up to.

  •  Oklahoma, too. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raincrow

    It might not be that surprising, but this study/map missed the state of Oklahoma, which recently enacted voter ID requirements. The first general election that will require voters present an ID will be the 2012 primaries and Nov. election.

    However, there is a special election on Oct. 11 for a state senate seat that has a good chance of changing to a Democratic candidate. Ken Meador (D) is a 3-time Iraq War vet (Army combat medic).

    http://www.meadorforsenate.com/

  •  "States" don't intoduce legislation - (0+ / 0-)

    individual legislators do.  The fact that a legislator happens to have introduced a bill doesn't mean there's any likelihood that a bill will ever be at passed or  signed onto law.

    This diarist tends to mischaracterize things in order to make a point.  But the mischaracterizations actually detract from the point.

    •  Not exactly (0+ / 0-)

      These laws are part of a nation-wide, coordinated campaign. To talk of "a legislator happens to have introduced a bill" is misleading.  Of course, it's true that introduction does not necessarily mean adoption, but it's not clear why anyone would confuse the two.

      Politics is the art of the possible, but that means you have to think about changing what is possible, not that you have to accept it in perpetuity.

      by David Kaib on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 06:05:04 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Ohio and Florida are the biggies (0+ / 0-)

    Tennessee, Alabama, Kansas -- won't be a factor in '12.

    Now: time to get cracking and start getting some people photo ID, birth certificates, etc. And time to pressure the FEC to intervene to every degree possible.

  •  Indiana is already victem on it's ID laws. In 2010 (0+ / 0-)

    election Indiana ranked 48th of the United States in percentage of voters not participating in the election. That's exactly how the repressive laws are supposed to work.

  •  Alabama law isn't that bad (0+ / 0-)

    According to the Alabama Secretary of State's website, the following are accepted as proof of identity:

    Current, Valid Photo Identification

    A. Government-issued photo identifications (current and valid)
    Employee identification for employee with photo of employee produced by the employer
    Photo identification card issued by Alabama college or university
    Photo identification issued from Alabama technical or professional school (current and valid)
    OR

    B. One of the following

    Utility bill of voter with voter's name and address
    Bank statement with voter's name and address
    Government check with voter's name and address
    Paycheck with voter's name and address
    Valid identification card (authorized by law) issued by the State of Alabama (including any branch, department, agency, or entity of the State of Alabama)
    Valid identification card (authorized by law) issued by any of the other 49 states (including any branch, department, agency, or entity of that State)
    Valid identification card (authorized by law) issued by the government of the United States of America (including any branch, department, agency, or entity of the federal government
    Valid United States passport
    Valid Alabama hunting license
    Valid Alabama fishing license
    Valid Alabama pistol/revolver permit
    Valid pilot's license issued by the FAA or other authorized agency of the federal government
    Valid United States military identification
    Birth certificate (certified copy)
    Valid Social Security card
    Naturalization document (certified copy)
    Court record of adoption (certified copy)
    Court record of name change (certified copy)
    Valid Medicaid card
    Valid Medicare card
    Valid electronic benefits transfer (EBT) card
    Government document that shows the name and address of the voter
    Note: Those items listed in Section B can be the original document (license, card, etc.) or a photocopy of the document.

    Most people will have at least one of those documents, so it shouldn't be a hardship on most voters and nowhere near disenfranchisement.

    "Truth never damages a cause that is just."~~~Mohandas K. Gandhi -9.38/-6.26

    by LynneK on Mon Oct 03, 2011 at 09:07:07 PM PDT

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