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Meagan just doesn't fit the stereotype.
I like the tools she has beside her. I love the woven basket type packs, I have one of bamboo myself, great for carrying things that would otherwise dig into your back. I'd think her's is made of birch, I think that's the traditional wood used in the US.

Notice also the pole with the loop of wire. The pole and loop are to restrain "by catch" while removing the trap. I hope I'm spelling by catch correctly, it's the term for unintended animals caught in traps. I think with modern traps and legal settings only similar sized and weight animals can get caught. I'm not even sure a coyote or bobcat could set off a trap. The myths of animals in pain chewing off legs makes for great fundraising if nothing else.

I came across this article via my google news aggregator, it culls all news wolf for me. http://www.jsonline.com/... The other wolf news is generally a steady switch from advocacy to science based management with the wolf now a big game species in seven states and hunted in six this year. A recent 9th circuit court decision also upheld delisting even without the congressional rider.

Probably the biggest news even though it makes no headlines isn't this fall's widespread hunt throughout the northern great lakes and rocky mountains but rather a quiet but growing consensus amongst wildlife professionals and especially wildlife biologists that many of the early assumptions about wolves are turning out to be at best premature and more likely true only in limited instances and even factually wrong.

Science is self correcting, experiments are repeated with very different results, hypotheses are re tested. Some of the more famous ideas to be re evaluated by the foremost researchers on the subject are trophic cascades, aspen re generation, affects on other predators, riparian zones, etc. Most famously (for wolf researchers that is) is the peer reviewed article by the worlds formost wolf researcher David Mech in Biological Conservation which is probably deserving of a post in and of itself as it lays asunder many of the more famous wolf myths.

Many famous wildlife biologists began their studies of wildlife while trapping as teens. It forces one to study and understand the habits of wild animals more than just about any other pursuit. Megan dreams of a career in natural resources management, I wish the best for her.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Museum quality tone deafness in this post. n/t (11+ / 0-)

    Almost nothing has a name.

    by johanus on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 07:43:56 AM PST

    •  Similar attributes in your comment. (4+ / 0-)

      ban nock's post definately makes me think.  I read the referenced article because I had a reaction to the post that wasn't all good.  I do hunt but am sensitive to how this type of wildlife management affects people.  I have a sister who is an animal reahabilitator and she would likely cry.  But after reading the article, I have a better understanding of an area and culture different than my own.  Perhaps you are missing an opportunity for discussion.

      You can't find the right road when the streets are paved. - Bob Marley

      by teknohed on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 08:08:15 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  i did read the article (0+ / 0-)
        Leaders of the Ojibwe tribes in Wisconsin have expressed their opposition to any wolf hunting or trapping.

        And several wolf experts, including University of Wisconsin professor Adrian Treves, have argued for more research before initiating a public wolf harvest.

        ...The state has received more than $200,000 in claims for livestock depredations caused by wolves - a record - this year.

        always follow the !@#$%& money.

        and i can understand respecting other cultures and what not, but there are limits.  there is nothing to respect about this.  nothing.

        sometimes, traditions need to die, and i don't care whose family been doin' it for centuries.  killing something one has no intention of eating or wearing is a sin.  

        that wolf had more nobility in its tail than she will ever possess.  god, i want to slap that smile right off her face.

        Please don't dominate the rap, Jack, if you got nothin' new to say - Grateful Dead

        by Cedwyn on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 02:06:18 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I'm glad this has scrolled off the recent list so (0+ / 0-)

          that no one else will read your wish to harm a 14 year old girl. You should be aware that there might well be links to this post from elsewhere. Imagine what others think when reading the last ten words you posted. Not something to be proud of.

          Cedwyn we agree on many things political, I often notice your comments and I applaud your strong partisan Democratic viewpoint, but I'd hope you can look within yourself and remove whatever hate exists such that you would wish to harm a 14 year old girl. I say this as both a Democrat and a father of a little girl.

          How big is your personal carbon footprint?

          by ban nock on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 07:15:07 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  asdf (12+ / 0-)

    disturbing story.  They are intelligent social animals...from your link...

    The Sierra Club said... "... body-gripping, restraining and killing traps and snares, including leg hold traps, to be ecologically indiscriminate and unnecessarily inhumane..."

    The [SPCA] also opposes trapping "because of the pain and distress" it causes.

    $ to DFA, none to DSCC/DCCC/DNC

    by grrr on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 07:52:45 AM PST

  •  Mmm. How do they taste? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ban nock

    I'm serious here.  I've heard dog is tasty, but my family would be disappointed if I tried a chunk of our beloved shitzu.

    "So what if a guy threw a shoe at me!"

    by FoodChillinMFr on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 07:57:03 AM PST

    •  I don't know, I've lived places where dog is eaten (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      FoodChillinMFr

      by some but by no means common.

      I choose not to eat animals we've raised mostly to be companions. Wolves aren't the same animal but are the same species as the domestic dog, besides I hear they stink. ;-)

      I don't even like touching coyotes, I'm probably just squeamish.

      How big is your personal carbon footprint?

      by ban nock on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 08:05:28 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  what's fun about killing wolves, exactly? (14+ / 0-)
    Maegan dispatched the animal with a single shot from a .22 rifle. The wolf was a female and weighed 62 pounds.
    Especially when they are trapped and can't escape. Sounds more like holding a kid down and cutting his hair to me.

    Lo que separa la civilizacion de la anarquia son solo siete comidas.

    by psilocynic on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 08:02:40 AM PST

    •  I'm not sure as I've never done so (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Thinking Fella

      either the wolf or the haircut.

      I'd think like most hunting and fishing the actual killing of the animal isn't the part that is looked forward to as fun nor shunned as uncomfortable, just a necessary part of the process. As with all animals at short range a 22 to the brain is the safest most humane method of dispatching it. No doubt Meagan has been shooting a 22 since an early age.

      To continue the haircut analogy you don't cut kids hair for fun, but because it needs cutting. The objective in hunting and trapping is to successfully harvest an animal. Fair chase is fair to other hunters, possibility of success is a consideration of other sportsmen, not the animal.

      I was asked to hunt coyotes by the director of a wildlife refuge. There are other goals for hunting other than meat or fur. I'd guess that Meagan has a multitude of motivations one of which she states, the kids at school think it's cool.

      How big is your personal carbon footprint?

      by ban nock on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 08:19:15 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Monster. (5+ / 0-)

    That girl is a monster. I can't believe she's being indoctrinated into killing dogs wolves -- social, conscious, loving, pain-feeling animals. By a method as long and painful as trapping nonetheless.

    The day may come, when the rest of the animal creation may acquire those rights which never could have been withholden from them but by the hand of tyranny.

    by Tetris on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 08:06:14 AM PST

    •  Lol. Cute post. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ban nock, Thinking Fella

      If the yard needs cutting, cut the lawn.  If the wolf population is out of control, control the population.

      I'm a dog owner and would happily take down a wolf, beer, deer, lion, elephant, badger, kangaroo, ewok if their populations were out of control and needed trimming.

      Hopefully she found a use for its'  fur or meat (if you can eat them) so that it went to some use.

      "So what if a guy threw a shoe at me!"

      by FoodChillinMFr on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 08:50:29 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I think from the article she's having a full body (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        FoodChillinMFr

        mount made of it. No doubt she's proud but my gosh, it must cost a bit, probably cut into her college fund.

        How big is your personal carbon footprint?

        by ban nock on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 09:02:36 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Grass v. Wolf v. Human (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Cedwyn

        Are wolves more like grass (a resource to be maintained without regard to their feelings) or humans (sentient conscious beings who form strong social bonds, enjoy life, and suffer when in pain or fear)?

        The day may come, when the rest of the animal creation may acquire those rights which never could have been withholden from them but by the hand of tyranny.

        by Tetris on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 01:54:53 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Are black widow spiders closer to... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Tetris

          humans or plants?  Surely they have feelings, for if not for their feelings they'd not bite.  Right?

          I'll eradicate every last one of those MF's I see.

          Now to answer your question on wolves.  I don't think we should kill for the fun of it (excepts spiders).  Leave the wolves alone unless they are threat/irritant.  Then, trim the population as be.

          "So what if a guy threw a shoe at me!"

          by FoodChillinMFr on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 02:23:44 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Spiral down. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Cedwyn

            Spiders are more like grass than a wolf is like grass. But at any rate: was this wolf a threat? Was killing necessary to trim the threat?

            The day may come, when the rest of the animal creation may acquire those rights which never could have been withholden from them but by the hand of tyranny.

            by Tetris on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 04:10:56 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  genetically I'd think we are pretty much exactly (0+ / 0-)

              like the spider, maybe a difference in the single digits as a percent. To a plant I'd think almost entirely different. Differences aside as any hunter or trapper will tell you wolves and other mammals are very intelligent and can think and learn. That's not the point. The wolf is also no threat.

              The reason to have a season to trap wolves is because the people of whatever state this was in decided that either they wanted a lower population of wolves or that they wanted to make revenue by selling licenses. Either motivation is a perfectly valid one. Further if wolves do become a threat or a large ecological or agricultural nuisance the state will have a knowledgeable population of trappers to rely on.

              Wildlife services costs about a couple thousand a wolf to cull, this young woman is free. Wherever you have wolves you will always have a need to manage them via lethal means. There are no uninhabited places on earth.

              How big is your personal carbon footprint?

              by ban nock on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 07:05:19 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

  •  are we supposed to celebrate this? (9+ / 0-)

    wtf?  killing wolves is no way to learn anything about them.

    screw that girl and screw her parents.

    Please don't dominate the rap, Jack, if you got nothin' new to say - Grateful Dead

    by Cedwyn on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 08:09:34 AM PST

  •  a demonstration of your Big Tent...? (0+ / 0-)

    ...smiling adolescent girls are the new faces on your propaganda?

  •  Fucking disgusting. (0+ / 0-)

    What a horrible person she must be.  I hate killers.

  •  You control the wolf population by... (9+ / 0-)

    ...controlling the deer population.

    Wolves eat deer. Deer exact 1000x more of a cost on society than wolves.

    There is no logical cause to hunt or trap wolves. Wolves are an apex predator. Apex predators are controlled through the population of their prey.

    I am not anti-hunting. I applaud the hunting of deer (though I lament that not enough of it is done, all in the name of keeping the herd optimally large for recreational hunting).

    The problem is, that with hunting deer and wolves, the focus is not on proper management (which would mean taking more deer and not taking wolves) but on the recreation. The excuse is always control, but control takes a backseat to the recreation and the industry.

    •  The motivations of trappers aren't the same as the (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Thinking Fella

      motivations for wildlife biologists. Biologists and Fish and Wildlife Departments are interested in maintaining all species such that none are endangered, and also at populations that fit objectives for revenue via license sales, their major source of funding.

      I believe but don't know as I'm not as familiar with the situation in the midwest, that deer populations haven't been very affected by wolf predation. In the west elk which are a significant source of food for many have been affected pretty severely. Revenue for Wildlife Departments is way down too.

      I often notice that state agencies issue licenses in an area and for species that don't need harvesting at the time just to maintain a viable population of hunters and trappers so that when the need arises to reduce game populations they have an experienced group of people who can simply increase their quota.

      Prey is only one way of limiting predator populations. In this case an unacceptable way as that would decrease the opportunity for human harvest of deer. Another source of population control for apex predators is another apex predator, in this case humans.

      Anecdotally I'd guess recreation to be an insignificant motivation for the current crop of wolf tag purchasers. Conservation would be a much larger reason to hunt. I'd think that very  quickly there won't be any motivation to hunt a species that our society doesn't eat. Then they'll probably have bounties as they do in Canada.

      How big is your personal carbon footprint?

      by ban nock on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 08:43:56 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  don't agree with this for a second (0+ / 0-)

        '...recreation to be an insignificant motivation for the current crop of wolf tag purchasers. Conservation would be a much larger reason to hunt.'

        but don't ask me anything, I take spiders outside and rescue injured animals when I can.

        I can't abide by this at all, there are plenty of things to kill, skin and eat without killing something for the thrill of it.

        You kill it, you clean it, we'll help you eat it is how I was brought up.

        This machine kills Fascists.

        by KenBee on Sun Nov 11, 2012 at 11:14:58 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Colonial Hunters Cooperated With Wolves (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ban nock

    Back in the days of 300 head deer herds (possibly a different subspecies of deer) and large wolf packs, the wolves learned that if they chased the herd into the white mans camp the hunters would only take the best cuts of meat and the hides and leave the rest for the wolves.

    There’s always free cheddar in a mousetrap, baby

    by bernardpliers on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 09:43:13 AM PST

    •  Probably elk, as they were widespread and herd up, (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bernardpliers

      elk herd up because of an anti predator strategy called "the selfish herd". As a relatively healthy adult elk in the center of a herd your chances of being eaten by a wolf are almost zero. If you are a single animal alone in the forest, if the pack finds you and is hungry, you are dead. That's why wolves are so deadly to moose which don't herd up. There have been good long term studies on moose in Alaska.

      The selfish herd is also why bull elk hide alone in the woods after the rut. Bulls are severely fatigued and often full of holes from the rut. With their horns they stand out and are an easy target as a weak animal.

      Wolves can make it easy to find the herd. Elk are actually the new world version of the red deer.

      How big is your personal carbon footprint?

      by ban nock on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 10:04:32 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  That Is Very Possible (0+ / 0-)

        There is also a folkloric idea that there were some sort of bigfoot whitetail deer species, which seems quite plausible to hunters who have seen the occasional gigantic whitetail.

        There’s always free cheddar in a mousetrap, baby

        by bernardpliers on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 10:57:02 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  besides the elk we know there was a pre historic (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          bernardpliers

          elk species that was the size of a large moose. Probably up to a ton.

          How big is your personal carbon footprint?

          by ban nock on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 11:10:42 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Body Size Changes Rapidly (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ban nock

            There were all sorts of giant ice age critters including armradillos and beavers.  But even within a species, gigantism or dwarfish can develop in a relatively  few generations.

            There’s always free cheddar in a mousetrap, baby

            by bernardpliers on Sat Nov 10, 2012 at 11:30:19 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

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