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I think that the above graphic, which was tweeted by Neil de Grasse Tyson - and based on data from Fox News(!!), shows an interesting relationship between a college education and who voted for Obama vs. Romney.  It also illustrates a pattern in states where higher education and critical thinking is more commonly valued.  

I don't have first-hand information, but I would guess that teaching critical thinking is not a part of most high school curricula.  It is, however, more common in college, especially university level education.  I'll also guess that critical thinking at right-wing colleges and universities is typically not rigorous with respect to this definition by Robert H. Ennis, which is one of my favorites:  

"Reasonable reflective thinking that is focused on deciding what to believe or do.  ...to seek a clear statement of the thesis or question; to seek reasons; to try to be well informed; to use credible sources and mention them; to take into account the total situation; to try to remain relevant to the main point; to keep in mind the original or basic concern; to look for alternatives; to be open-minded; to take a position when the evidence and reasons are sufficient to do so; to seek as much precision as the subject permits; to deal in an orderly manner with the parts of a complex whole; to use one's CT abilities; to be sensitive to feelings, level of knowledge, and degree of sophistication of others."

I have heard and read comments by people from the right who use the term "critical thinking" as a talking point, but I don't think they really understand the the concept.  The right ignores almost every point in the above definition, so much that to highlight the relevant points would require highlighting virtually the entire quote.

Poll

Which group includes more true critical thinkers?

53%89 votes
8%14 votes
21%36 votes
5%9 votes
0%0 votes
1%2 votes
9%15 votes

| 165 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (6+ / 0-)

    “There is a cult of ignorance in the U.S...anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.”

    by DaveVH on Tue Nov 13, 2012 at 07:01:49 AM PST

  •  The Right is correct (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    slowbutsure

    Going to college brainwashes you and you become a Democrat or worse.

    Mit der Dummheit kämpfen Götter selbst vergebens.

    by MoDem on Tue Nov 13, 2012 at 07:08:15 AM PST

  •  Ecological fallacy. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    yet another liberal, condorcet

    The chart says nothing about the individual-level relationship between education and voting. The exit polls, as usual, show a curvilinear relationship between education and voting, with Obama taking both the least educated and the advanced-degree holders, and Romney's support peaking among voters with a bachelor's degree.

    Grew a mustache and a mullet / Got a job at Chick-Fil-A

    by cardinal on Tue Nov 13, 2012 at 07:08:44 AM PST

    •  Your sound smart and capable of critical thinking (0+ / 0-)

      I've got to go take care of some things, and will return to this later.  

      Rather than a simple non-nuanced put-down-style comment, can you tell me why do you think there is such a discrepancy?

      Your point is apparently valid - you write about numbers of 4-year college graduates of all ages (apparently the cohort you are including) who voted and participated in exit polling.

      My point also appears to be valid - I posted about the election results in states based on all residents who are college graduates, over 25 y/o, and  including those with post-graduate studies and degrees?  

      You ignored most of the points in my quote on critical thinking.  I would like to have a discussion based on more than superficial information, and using critical thinking.  If this diary sticks around, I'll be back to discuss this more later.

      “There is a cult of ignorance in the U.S...anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.”

      by DaveVH on Tue Nov 13, 2012 at 07:36:15 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  we can't have people learning facts (0+ / 0-)

    because facts have a liberal bias.

  •  Whom did college-educated voters favor? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cardinal, distraught

         The exit poll data I've seen indicates that Governor  Romney may have had the edge among those whose formal education concluded with a college degree, while President Obama won among those who did post-graduate work.  

         All-in-all, the exit polling data undermines the conclusion suggested by the chart

    •  Exit poll doesn't contradict (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DaveVH

      The no-college population has more minorities and lower income than those with Bachelor's degrees, which explains the difference without supporting or contradicting the chart.
      Grad students could be considered more interested in learning than money, so their support for Obama supports the idea. (With all polling in the 49-55% range, it's not strong for any position.)

      Conservatives seem to oppose teaching critical thinking and support learning by rote, and have more control over red-state curricula. They also view college more negatively. (Remember the "Professor Warren" attack, and how it failed in Massachusetts.) I don't know if red-state voters think less critically or just choose not to go to college, but either way Obama comes out as the thinking person's candidate.

      •  Thanks for the thoughtful response. (0+ / 0-)

        This diary is headed for the dustbin, but thanks aurochs, for a response that showed a bit of "critical" thinking.

        The loss of critical thinking, and the relationship of that loss to the non-nuanced world of soundbites/twitter/texting - could make for an interesting discussion in itself - if enough people would bother with thoughtful and nuanced responses.

        I don't do tweets and texting - I'm a certified old geezer who believes that many things cannot be reduced to a sentence or two.  However, there is a disease of often empty short statements infects cable news, particularly Fox, and also rears its ugly head even here at KosVille.  I enjoy reading DailyKos diaries, both by front pagers and ordinary Kossacks, However, I don't read nearly as many comments as I used to because of the lack of thoughtful content.  Unless, of course, a scan of the thread reveals some nuanced and thoughtful responses.

        “There is a cult of ignorance in the U.S...anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.”

        by DaveVH on Tue Nov 13, 2012 at 10:04:04 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  FRENCH COCONUT PIE! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DaveVH, condorcet

    That is all.

  •  To the point of critical thinking, (0+ / 0-)

    I agree with the point that Obama is the thinking-person's candidate. The reason why might be college education, but there also might be a third-variable at play, connecting education with voting, and that's the delay of gratification. I wrote about this alternative perspective last week in a diary titled "I'll take two, thank you". The analogy I considered stems from the "marshmallow study" started by Walter Mischel at Stanford in the 1970s, and that carried out over many years. The longitudinal assessments showed that adults who, as children, were willing to stare at a marshmallow for 15 minutes to hold out for more were more likely, among other things, to graduate from college. My position then is that "delayers" are who voted for Obama, because they are willing to listen and think about Obama's perspectives and recognize that his plans have not yet had time to come to fruition, whereas "non-delayers" (those who instantly ate the first marshmallow, thereby forfeiting the second) were captivated by Romney's soundbites and not inclined to explore the possibility that they were short-sighted or wrong-headed, or whatever.

    •  Fits right in with critical thinking... (0+ / 0-)

      Interesting point, Eric.  

      Critical thinking takes time and effort - a propensity to go for instant gratification gratification precludes taking the time to research and analyze.

      I will be the first to admit that there have been times when I've taken the "shortcut" in various situations and regretted it later.

      “There is a cult of ignorance in the U.S...anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.”

      by DaveVH on Tue Nov 13, 2012 at 01:29:50 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

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