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Obama getting closer to 51% now at 50.96

Maintained by David Wasserman @redistrict

NY: That probably means @BarackObama national margin over @MittRomney will fall slightly short of 5M votes, but he'll hit ~51.1%
@Redistrict via web

Carl Hiaasen:

[Paul] Ryan, who’s trying to extricate himself from the wreckage of the Romney campaign, is also running for the White House in 2016. In the absence of a Gaga-style makeover and mass voter amnesia, he can’t win. This year he couldn’t even deliver his home state of Wisconsin.

[Marco] Rubio, on the other hand, will be worth watching once voters recover from the hangover of 2012. His appeal is potentially broader than that of anybody on the GOP horizon, which isn’t saying much, but he’s still their best hope.

If the guys running the party were smart, here’s what they’d do: They would put Rubio, the son of Cuban immigrants, in charge of writing an immigration-reform bill that included a pathway to citizenship for the millions of undocumented aliens already living and working in the United States.

No single act would do more to convince Hispanic voters that the GOP wasn’t innately hostile toward them. That’s crucial because the White House cannot be won by a candidate who scares off Hispanics the way Romney and John McCain did.

NY Times:
Even if Republicans were to agree to Mr. Obama’s core demand — that the top marginal income rates return to the Clinton-era levels of 36 percent and 39.6 percent after Dec. 31, rather than stay at the Bush-era rates of 33 percent and 35 percent — the additional revenue would be only about a quarter of the $1.6 trillion that Mr. Obama wants to collect over 10 years. That would be about half of the $800 billion that Republicans have said they would be willing to raise.

That calculation alone suggests the scope of the other major tax issues to be negotiated beyond tax rates. And that is why many people in both parties remain unsure that a deal will come together before Jan. 1. Without agreement, more than $500 billion in automatic tax increases on all Americans and cuts in domestic and military programs will take hold, which could cause a recession if left in place for months, economists say.

Leonard Pitts, Jr. on the 'read my lips - no new taxes' conundrum for republicans:
A few words to ponder as we sail toward the fiscal cliff. Those words would be: “That was then, this is now.”

Strip away the false piety and legalistic hair splitting offered by Republican lawmakers rationalizing their decision to abandon a pledge that they will never ever, ever, ever vote to raise taxes, and that’s pretty much what the explanation boils down to.

Rep. Peter King says he understood the pledge, propounded by the almighty Grover Norquist and his group Americans for Tax Reform, to obligate him for only one term. Apparently, he thought it had to be renewed, like a driver’s license.

Sen. Lindsey Graham says that if Democrats agree to entitlement reform, “I will violate the pledge for the good of the country” — a stirring statement of patriotism and sacrifice that warms your heart like a midnight snack of jalapeño chili fries.

In other words: bull twinkies. If you want the truth of why a trickle of GOP lawmakers is suddenly willing to blaspheme the holy scripture of their faith, it’s simple. The pledge used to be politically expedient. Now it is not.

Anne-Marie Slaughter on one aspect of Hillary's legacy and problems:
Women of my generation remember well how big a step it was for Madeleine Albright to break the secretary of state glass ceiling in 1997. Just a decade later, by 2008, Carol Jenkins, then president of the Women’s Media Center, was noting that “secretary of state has become the women’s spot — a safe expected place for women to be.”

I’m not so sure about that. A recent news report quoted a “longtime foreign-policy expert who has worked for Democratic administrations” as saying that Rice’s voice “is always right on the edge of a screech,” reminding us that sexist caricatures of strong women as witches — or a word that rhymes with that — still abound.

Another angle from the NY Times:
Mrs. Clinton may find that her freedom comes with one huge constraint. The more serious she is about 2016, the less she can do — no frank, seen-it-all memoir; no clients, commissions or controversial positions that could prove problematic. She will be under heavy scrutiny even by Clinton standards, discovering what it means to be a supposedly private citizen in the age of Twitter. With the election four years away — a political eon — she will have to tend and protect her popularity, and she may find herself in a cushy kind of limbo, unable to make many decisions about her life until she makes the big one about another White House try.
An interesting Michael Gerson article on Dorothy Day:
The recent vote by America’s Catholic bishops to move Dorothy Daytoward canonization was controversial, but mainly among those who manufacture controversy for a living. The media have enjoyed pointing out that Day’s main advocate, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, is a traditionalist, while Day was a socialist who once had an abortion. It must be something like a conservative president nominating a raging liberal to the Supreme Court, except with eternal tenure at stake.

The application of political categories to theological matters is usually a mistake. In this case, it exceeds the media’s usual quota of religious ignorance.

See Mark Sumner's Alternative Pundit Round-up here.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Good morning, Greg. (7+ / 0-)

    Carl Hiaasen link needs fixing.

    Back to reading...

  •  NYTimes (8+ / 0-)

    This one - Mrs. Clinton may find that her freedom comes with one huge constraint - seems to be just somebody looking for a problem.

    I think Secretary Clinton is savvy enough to know her way around, and she knows what she wants, and has good instincts after decades of public life, so this is not going to be a problem for her.

    •  Exactly (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      OLinda, mdmslle, thomask, Van Buren, Lysis

      When has Secretary Clinton NOT been under a microscope in the last 20 years?
      Entirely of her own choosing, of course, but to suggest that she needs advice on how to act over the next 4 years is pretty laughable.

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:26:31 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I see it from the other side (4+ / 0-)

        doesn't matter what she does the next four years--the opposition has a nuclear warhead of negative advertising ready for her run.  I don't think she will ever get elected President, she just has too much baggage, too vulnerable to negative attacks.  We saw the GOP attack machine begin to be trundled out in the 2008 primaries, and it was definitely ready for shock and awe.  The surprise nomination of Obama caught them flatfooted.

        The GOP are held to different standards than the Democrats.  In the GOP you can pay a hooker to dress you up in diapers, no problem.  And you can be as dirty as Donald Trump or Herman Cain and still run in the primary.  But a Democrat can be as boring and professorial as Obama, faithful to his wife, etc., and still it will be all over the media how he's a gay Muslim Jeremiah-Wright Christian zealot communist fascist Kenyan.  Clinton doesn't have a chance, Rove must have dossier on her a mile deep.

        •  eh, Rove is finished (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Diana in NoVa, Micheline

          and the GOP lost.

          Doesn't mean they're extinct, but it does mean Hillary has a great shot at 2016 and is far from an automatic loss. Or win.

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 06:34:03 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Whether Hillary "has a great shot at 2016" (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Lysis

            will depend much more on what the Republicans do over the next couple of years than what Hillary herself does.

            If the Republicans prove themselves to be more politically obstructionist, contrary to ideas elevating the middle class and even more firmly on the side of the wealthy between now and the beginning of the 2016 campaign, they will rob themselves of any smidgen of respect they may have left with the majority of voters.  The electorate will no more listen to them them trash-talk Hillary during the next presidential campaign than they were willing to swallow the outrageous attacks against Obama this campaign.

            "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

            by SueDe on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 07:21:16 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I disagree, the trash talk against Obama was just (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Amber6541, Laconic Lib, skohayes

              talk.  He was and is squeaky clean.  Trash talk against Clinton will have more evidence behind it, due, unfairly, to the sins of her husband, but it's a rich field for negative ads.

              Even on anti-progressive ads--Bill Clinton was President during some of the worst legislation ever by the Republican Congress.  He wasn't responsible for those laws, but he did sign them--DADT, razing of the anti-bank protections set up by FDR that led to the Great Recession, wiping out the protections of welfare.

              •  And DOMA. (0+ / 0-)

                Toters aren't likely to hold Bill's triangulations with the Republican congress against her though.  

                But she would have her own baggage.  I imagine we would hear the saga of Whitewater all over again, and Travelgate, and the far-right lunatics would no doubt dredge up her "affair" with Vince Foster and his subsequent"murder" again.  sigh....

                I don't want her to run for president anyway.  I want her to head an international agency concentrating on women's rights and social justice.  Or a seat on the SCOTUS - but not until Democrats have a supermajority in the senate.  I don't want to listen to the Republicans caterwauling about her nomination.   Unfortunately she may be too old to be considered for the high court.

                "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

                by SueDe on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 07:12:54 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Women's Rights are Human Rights (0+ / 0-)

                  I want her to head an international agency concentrating on women's rights and social justice.

                  I am tired of such issues being treated separately, almost as if it's "women's work" to deal with them.

                  I don't want her heading an international organization that won't have any real power.  I want the president of the United States of America making the case to the world that women's rights are non-negotiable.

                  That's her legacy as a lawyer, First Lady, Senator, and Secretary of State.  It's time for that to be the legacy of a U.S. President.

  •  Expedience. (5+ / 0-)

    --The pledge used to be politically expedient. Now it is not.--

    That's the GOP...serving the country since...well never.

    That said, not ever sure political expedience is going to work this time.  There is a significant % of the right who still believes in this nonsense.  

     In the end, perhaps the deal made the last round is the only deal that could have worked.  Tax policy by time-bomb.  Awesome way to run a country.

  •  Not going to happen (5+ / 0-)
    If the guys running the party were smart, here’s what they’d do: They would put Rubio, the son of Cuban immigrants, in charge of writing an immigration-reform bill that included a pathway to citizenship for the millions of undocumented aliens already living and working in the United States.
    The GOP, while wanting the Hispanic vote, is still deeply racist and xenophobic.  More importantly, they are cowardly and scared shitless of being primaried by the far far right. Does Rubio strike you as being a courageous fellow, ready to stand up to intolerance?

    the Republican brand is totally bankrupt.

    by vlyons on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:05:22 AM PST

    •  Rather than broad brush the whole party, (5+ / 0-)

      I would suggest that the Tea Party wing of the GOP is the racist, isolationist factor. My parents have been moderate republicans all their lives and are the ones who taught me that racism is always wrong. There are plenty of republicans out there that aren't racist ignorant fools like the Tea Party.
      Their view is artificially inflated within the ranks now because the party is still pandering to them and they're the loudest in the room.
      I do agree with you that if Rubio puts forth a reasonable immigration reform bill, he will never win the nomination, unless something dramatic happens and the Tea Party splits off from the GOP.

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:50:30 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I couldn't have said it better myself. /eom (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skohayes
      •  Define: plenty. Because I don't think that's true. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        coffejoe, zekeaz

        Indeed, probably more than half of republicans (including the "moderate ones" who don't THINK they're racists are, in fact, racists. Know how I know? Because there's very little POLICY reason for a "moderate republican" to hate Obama. He is not that far left of a "moderate" republican.

        Look, I understand your parents aren't racist. But sorry, the majority of today's GOP is. Either overtly or subconsciously. Most people like your parents are now "democrats".

        For the record, I am not a member of Courtesy Kos. Just so you know. Don't be stupid. It's election season. My patience is short.

        by mdmslle on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:55:02 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  No, they're not Democrats (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Egalitare, zekeaz, Laconic Lib

          They still believe in smaller government, although with my dad being an accountant, the fiscal "conservatism" claim from Republicans is pretty much trashed after the Bush, Bush and Reagan years. Even my dad can't defend that.
          They still believe in a strong military, and the idea of the US as the world's policeman.
          And I realize that my anecdote is not evidence of anything (other than it's pretty common among many Republicans in the northeast), but your declaration that most Republicans are racists because they didn't vote for Obama, despite his policies, completely ignores the polarization between the two parties- many moderate republicans may agree with Obama's policies, but that doesn't mean they'll vote for him.
          They wouldn't vote for any Democrat.

          “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

          by skohayes on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 06:06:07 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I'm a democrat and I'm not scared of "smaller (4+ / 0-)

            government". is that how we're defining democrat vs. republican now?

            I think there's a TON of waste in government.

            I think we could use a smaller more efficient government. What do I mean "smaller"? Well, probably different than what today's GOP would mean, but probably not far from what your dad means.

            As far as the racism within the GOP, (and in America in general) I stand by my statement. I think on some level we all battle with prejudice and racism. It would be impossible not to. I think MUCH of the irrational attitudes toward Obama, and the complete way people ignore the FACTS of his presidency are, yes, aided along by prejudicial and/or racist attitudes. It has nothing to do with the facts or an objective examination of his policy proscriptions. A perfect example is the ACA. This was a "government takeover" and opposed by both radical conservatives and "moderates" alike. But it was Nixon's plan. And the Heritage Foundation. So why is it Marxism under Obama? Another example: Obama is the spendingest president - more than all others combined. NOT TRUE.

            I'm sorry but the GOP is aided in their aspersions of Obama but conscious or subconscious prejudice and racism within the party. There is a level of irrationality and paranoia that is the hallmark of the party and so-called "moderates" like Dick Lugar can't even pretend to be reasonable, you can't claim the so-called tea party is an anomaly in the party. It IS the party.

            I'm not sure about "plenty" of moderate republicans. Maybe they're voting for democrats. As they well should. They have more in common with our party than their own at this point.

            For the record, I am not a member of Courtesy Kos. Just so you know. Don't be stupid. It's election season. My patience is short.

            by mdmslle on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 06:26:11 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  I think it comes down to the demographics... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          skohayes

          ...of the 365-day-a-year activists. The ones who populate the County level Party offices, precinct captaincies, etc. It is the overwhelming number of those Party members who consider themselves the gatekeepers against any barbarians that might challenge current GOP doctrine. Those people don't need to be a majority of the party: they are the "guardians of the local party constitution and bylaws" who resist any "reformation" that might occur in the near term, and they are probably very actively recruiting and grooming like-minded younger members to take their places when they are no longer vigorous enough to "man the parapets."

          In the longer term, they won't succeed: eventually the GOP will be forced to either reform or splinter, but in the near term those people are in charge now, and most of them are immune to the likes of any presumed national or even state power that might rationalize "reformation."

          When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

          by Egalitare on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 06:08:34 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  well skohayes, many Republicans are not (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Buzzer, skohayes

        racist. However, those non-racist ones are sitting on the sidelines, saying nothing. No objections, no corrections, no disavowels  -- well at least few and far between. Certainly not enough to make the racists social pariahs. Not so far from the good Germans of the early 20th C, who stood by, eh?

        A lot of people from my generation did something about racism and immoral wars in Asia. We stood up to our own Dem party and said No! So I ask again. Is Rubio a courageous fellow, who will stand up to racism, hatred, and ignorance? He couldn't even come out straight, simple and clear that the earth was billions of years old. No, he had to hem and haw and spend a few days how not to seem too stupid, yet leave lots of wiggle room for creationists to teach their kids that Adam & Eve lived with dinosaurs.

        the Republican brand is totally bankrupt.

        by vlyons on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 06:37:10 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  They may not be (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skohayes

        ...individual racists, but they tend to support policies that are rooted in institutional racism, even --or perhaps because-- they don't see them as racist: policies like tough on crime bills, or stand your ground laws, or limiting food stamp programs, or reducing teacher salaries, or right to work laws, or cutting student loans and pell grants...

        The bigger issue is that far too many members of the GOP have been willing to sail into positions of power, privilege and dominance on the waves of racist-inspired logic or racially-privileging white folks interests for a very, very long time.  That doesn't make those individual folks racists per se, but it does make them part of a very large subset of white Americans who have benefitted in some way from racism.

        Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

        by a gilas girl on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 10:08:10 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  i'm ready for 2016 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Diana in NoVa, Jeremimi

    and I'm backing Hillary.

    •  2008 and 2016 (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      CrissieP, aaraujo

      The great part about the 2008 Democratic primary was that I had the opportunity to vote for one of two awesome candidates.  I picked Obama, not because Hillary was "worse," but because I thought he would be better.

      He can't run again, so it's now all her.

      "O mulier, magna est fides tua. Fiat tibi sicut vis."

      by rujoking on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 08:37:08 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Gerson surprised me! (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jnhobbs, Diana in NoVa, Laconic Lib

    I guess here's a writer who understands that when he gets away from traditional political writing he doesn't have to bring his political biases with him.  Thanks for posting this.

    -7.75, -8.10; All it takes is security in your own civil rights to make you complacent.

    by Dave in Northridge on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:09:19 AM PST

    •  Gerson often surprises (3+ / 0-)

      he was spot on with PEPFAR/AIDS research support at a time other conservatives didn't get it.

      He is the Bush speechwriter that came up with compassionate conservatism. Unlike his boss, Gerson believes in it. That makes interesting reading.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:15:02 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Gerson distorted the controversy on Day (4+ / 0-)

      Day's own grandchildren have said, repeatedly, that she never considered herself a saint and did not wish to be the subject of a canonization proceeding.  Worst, the New York hierarchy seems determined to make Day, a lifelong radical who was arrested for protesting war, weapons, and the maltreatment of the helpless, as a hardcore anti-abortionist.  This is all public knowledge, and Gerson not acknowledging this is appalling.

  •  head meet wall (9+ / 0-)

    How many times must one sit here and say it all over again, Latins will not vote against their own interests. You can stuff the constetution up Marco's ass,  and we still wont vote for a Republican.
    Its amazing how everyone keeps saying that latins will jump the boat for one reason or another. like we horses with carrots.
    Again white people or what ever damn color you are.....
    we vote for those who make sure our kids get good schools, give us police protection, give us services that we pay for, opportunities, and maybe even some imigration reform.
    Oh and Rubio is a Cuban.. if you dont know the difference stop making stupid comments about who we would vote for.

    I think Jesus meant christian as a verb not a noun

    by rageagnstmach on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:11:11 AM PST

    •  But But But....Latins are conservative....I heard (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      rageagnstmach, mdmslle, Egalitare

      it on the teevee.

      •  GOP Villagers keep denying the biggest... (7+ / 0-)

        ...reason they are losing voters of color, not just African-Americans and non-Cuban Hispanics (though Cuban-Americans may have turned the corner now as well) but also the entire spectrum of Asians and Pacific Islanders. All of those groups "poll" recognizably more socially conservative than the "standard" Democratic activists, but they share one thing that  tends to override any misgivings about abortion, sex education, religious freedom or any other "magic bullet value" that the GOP talking heads pretend they simply need to emphasize to make electoral gains with those groups: COMMUNITY.

        The GOP, with the urging and financial backing of the Financial Elites, have insisted that in the words of former British PM Thatcher "There is no such thing as society." They disempowered and rejected the Communitarians in their midst as "RINOs" long ago. They will continue to recruit, reward and cultivate the Tim Scotts, Nikki Haleys, Bobby Jindals, and Marco Rubios, but they will not - at least for the next few election cycles - come to grips with what makes whole communities of minorities "tick."

        When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

        by Egalitare on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:56:35 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I agree - I also have a less sophisticated way (0+ / 0-)

          that I think about the GOP and minority communities - I use a party metaphor.  GOP really doesn't want people of color at their party because they might have to change the music or the decorations a little bit.  And people of color KNOW that they are not on the invitation list.  Then it turns out that the GOP can't guarantee the minimum number to partygoers needed to rent the venue they want. So they find some POC and give them a late invitation.  But as a person of color,  even though the party may be fun, you can never shake the fact that they didn't want you there in the first place.  I often think of my older, very religious, African- American relatives who you might assume could be persuaded with very socially-conservative messages -  deep-down, they feel that they are not really liked or respected by the GOP and that lack of a base level of respect and trust has an overwhelming influence on their thinking and voting patterns.

    •  I quoted a comment yesterday from (9+ / 0-)

      Elon James White who said basically the same thing:

      Can anyone reasonably make the argument that the Republican Party showed itself to be a better alternative to President Obama? We should have voted for the dude who said "If they want free stuff, vote for the other guy"? The guy making Birther jokes? We were "emotional" because we rejected the party that even now says it doesn't care where new revenue comes from as it actively tries to make sure that revenue doesn't come from the top 2 percent?

      snip

      We haven't been tricked. We've been observant.

      http://www.dailykos.com/...

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:57:46 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  GOP...misread 2010....misread polls...will misread (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    aaraujo

    fiscal cliff......Why?.....It's in their nature.

  •  Hey.. here's an idea.. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    coffejoe, zekeaz

    The GOP should give in on the taxes for the wealthiest 2%, and Obama should get serious about actually reducing the deficit.

    I'm a genius!  This could happen tomorrow!

    /snark off

    This whole battle to the fiscal cliff is a joke.  neither side is bargaining from a serious position.  We will still see $1.1 Trillion plus deficits far into the future, with a languishing economy.  Oh boy!

    At this point, I am in the "Let's take a ride over the cliff" crowd.  I see $500 Billion in new revenues and 8% across the board cuts.  Our government could find 8% in cuts without blinking.  And every taxpayer needs to start getting get used to paying for all the goodies they want.  Works for me.

    •  doesn't work for anyone else (6+ / 0-)

      on the revenue side taxes do need to go up, but not necessarily during a recession.

      On the spending side, austerity fails.. every time.

      The flaw in your logic isn't where we go, it's when we do it. "All at once" is bad policy.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:20:39 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  as for where to cut spending, Simpson Bowles (8+ / 0-)

      says wait on medicare. I agree. Social Security should be off the table, not part of the deficit. I agree.

      I also agree with spending cuts for the military, but with a razor and not an ax. Cut weapons programs, not salaries and health.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:22:37 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  The GOP has never cared about the deficit (6+ / 0-)

      the deficit is only ever important to them when the political hue of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue is blue.

      In 2010 they ran round like headless chickens screaming "stop the spending, stop the spending". Now with the possibility of reduced spending and increased revenue around the corner they are screaming about the "fiscal cliff" and how the military cuts are going to lead to job losses. They have become Military Keynesians again.

      They have no credibility.

      With regard to 8% cuts, ask the UK whether such a degree of cuts is "easy". It isn't. The cuts fall on services that are needed, often by the very poorest who never have a voice in this.

  •  Radio Wingnut last night: JC Watts is a friend of (0+ / 0-)

    mine....but JC watts is too dumb to be head of the RNC.........I'm guessing Gohmert would be mo' bettah.

  •  Double pundit round up this morning. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes

    Mark has posted into recent diaries. :)

  •  Greg, (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greg Dworkin

    if you post over on the right, and then move it over here, you would have a tip jar. :)

  •  income cap (6+ / 0-)

    Is anyone proposing eliminating the cap on FICA?  Has anyone figured out how much that would raise?  Since the government now regularly raids the ss surplus (blame LBJ for that), and since ss is one of the "entitlements" most threatened, this seems to be a no brainer.
    It should be remembered that the Rs have successfully destroyed the post office by making it fund retiree health care for 75 years.  This is their plan for everything outside the military--privatize.

    Apres Bush, le deluge.

    by melvynny on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:33:37 AM PST

  •  (Not so) Big Tent Party (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mdmslle, skohayes

    2016 will be no better for conservatives unless they change what they believe in, not just which candidates they decide to run. Barack Obama's reelection was not based on tricks or technicalities, but rather a larger percentage of this country agreeing with his proposals and trusting him with our future rather than a Republican candidate. And the fabric of America is changing, too. The GOP can win 100 percent of the 45+ white vote, but that means nothing when more and more voters are young or Hispanic, African Americans, etc. Republicans have closed their tent, and they are reaping the bitter fruit of that strategy.  -  progressive

  •  methinks the rampant racism of the GOP has (6+ / 0-)

    made latino voters much more aware of the OTHER issues that make the GOP antithetical to their interests - not just "immigration reform".

    So I disagree that "No single act would do more to convince Hispanic voters that the GOP wasn’t innately hostile toward them."

    It's beyond that now.

    For the record, I am not a member of Courtesy Kos. Just so you know. Don't be stupid. It's election season. My patience is short.

    by mdmslle on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:50:36 AM PST

    •  Exactly (6+ / 0-)

      Ive had commenters here ( or trolls ) tell me that Latins may vote for a latin if the Republicans put one out.
      We know better than to vote for some spanish sounding name. It drives me insane to have to explain this to people. We know who hates us and wouldnt care if they had a spanish name they hate us. Its that simple.

      I think Jesus meant christian as a verb not a noun

      by rageagnstmach on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 05:55:34 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  as an AA, I concur. I couldn't care less what (6+ / 0-)

        the GOP wraps itself in to make it seem like they like my people, we are not stupid. We will not be voting republican. If they want to believe we voted for Obama (and democrats) because he's black, they're welcome to that delusion. Or that we'd consider the GOP if a "herman cain" or "allen west" was at the top of the ticket, they are, again, welcomed to that delusion.

        No. we get it. You hate us and every policy you espouse is detrimental to our well-being and success and the success of our children.

        kthxbai.

        For the record, I am not a member of Courtesy Kos. Just so you know. Don't be stupid. It's election season. My patience is short.

        by mdmslle on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 06:01:22 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Re the Hiaasen piece. Paul Ryan (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mmacdDE, skohayes, bythesea, Minnesota Deb

    is going to have trouble keeping audiences from slipping into a coma.  Ryan is dull.  He struck me this year as someone with nothing to say and no talent for speaking or engaging an audience -- a serious charisma deficit.

    Ryan gets notice in conservative circles for being some sort of budget whiz.  I'm yet to register Ryan as a budget whiz.  Cheez whiz, maybe.    

    In the Who'd Ya Rather Take a Cross-Country Road Trip With criterion, Governor Schweitzer of Montana beats the hell out of Paul Ryan.  It's not even close.  Don't know who will be on the blue ticket, but IMO the red ticket is in trouble already.

    For a Republican to beat Ryan for the nomination, he or she would have only to be a pinch more charismatic than a doorknob.  

    There's a lot of folks in the GOP who want the nomination.  But not very many of them are terribly interesting.  

  •  Dorothy Day was a convert (0+ / 0-)

    & the old saying, "No one is more Catholic than a convert" applies to her. She was deeply conservative in a way we can hardly comprehend anymore, for she reached back into the pre-Constantinian church for inspiration. She found there strong endorsements of her communalism & pacifism.

    "There ain't no sanity clause." Chico Marx

    by DJ Rix on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 06:11:59 AM PST

  •  excellent round-up, better than many (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes

    thank, greg!  keep them coming!

  •  Link to alt roundup is broken nt (0+ / 0-)
  •  Hiassen has the same blindness (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greg Dworkin, Amber6541

    that many pundits have with Marco Rubio- they think, because he's the current star of the GOP's few token Latinos,  that left leaning Latinos would vote for him.
    If it weren't for his name, he would be ignored by the GOP.
    Must be fairly insulting, but he's certainly taking advantage of it.

    “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

    by skohayes on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 06:32:46 AM PST

  •  The GOP hasn't learned yet (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes, zekeaz, Minnesota Deb

    that it's not their presidential candidates who are running off Hispanic voters - it's GOP controlled state legislatures like AL and AZ passing harsh anti-immigrant laws.

  •  Woo-hoo! Romney gains in Phila. voting. In today's (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, skohayes

    Phila. Inquirer "Heard in the Hall" section, Bob Warner reports:

       "Good news for Mitt Romney! Contrary to early vote counts, based solely on computerized returns  from Philadelphia's voting machines, he did not get blanked in 59 of the city's 1,687 voting divisions.
       A groundswell of support among people voting by absentee and provisional ballots reduced the number of divisions where Romney received zaero votes to 50."

    (oh, and in 99 divisions he was supported by one (1) voter).

    "A young man who wishes to remain a sound Atheist cannot be too careful of his reading. There are traps everywhere ". C. S. Lewis

    by TofG on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 06:37:32 AM PST

  •  Wow, struck gold this morning--TWO pundit (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Amber6541

    roundups!  Thoroughly enjoyed reading both.

    And thank YOU, Greg, for reading certain pundits so we don't have to.  Sometimes I think about how early in the morning you must get up--fueled, no doubt, by coffee and beignets with tangerine-flavored frosting--to read all this and then abbreviate it for us. Well done.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 06:45:55 AM PST

  •  Bah humbug (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    belle1

    Is anyone else procrastinating in their yuletiding? I haven't even put up my friggin' tree and all I've done is buy Mrs. JP a few gifts online. I've been busy formatting and proofing my new CreateSpace novels. If you're a writer, you'll know that's a pain. This is what my second CS novel looks like, along with some trivia about it.

    JP
    http://kindleindawind.blogspot.com

    Defending bad taste and liberalism since 2005.

    by jurassicpork on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 07:19:06 AM PST

  •  With regards to Hillary: All she has to do is (0+ / 0-)

    campaign and work for progressive causes and be an advocate.

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

    by zenbassoon on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 07:47:10 AM PST

  •  My cup runneth over (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greg Dworkin

    The Abbreviated Pundit Round-up is my favorite read every morning- and we have two!

  •  A tiger by the tail (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    CrissieP, Greg Dworkin

    "If the guys running the party were smart, here’s what they’d do: They would put Rubio, the son of Cuban immigrants, in charge of writing an immigration-reform bill that included a pathway to citizenship for the millions of undocumented aliens already living and working in the United States."

    Well, maybe if the guys running their party were smart enough to want Ds to win.

    The Rs have this dilemma right now in respect to Hispanic voters, that letting more of them vote by opening up citizenship, risks creating a whole lot more D voters; while clamping down on the numbers of Hispanic voters guarantees that they will continue to lose Hispanc voters to the Ds.  Fight the demographic tide and they get a lousy share of Hispanic votes, open the floodgates to improve their share, and there's more Hispanic votes.

    The problem for Rs with Hiassen's open-the-floodgates strategy is that they may not be able to get back nearly enough vote share among Hispanics to come close to making up for how the new voters will vote.  This is partly because the new voters will be working poor to lower middle class, and unlikely to vote R on that basis.  But it's largely because what the Rs have done to alienate Hispanics isn't just a matter of public policy disagreement -- it's a matter of blood libel.

    It really doesn't do to say that the Rs are strict on immigration out of their devotion to the rule of law, because they cannot tolerate the law-breaking of the undocumented.  That begs the question of whether the laws the undocumented have broken make sense or not, whether they are just or not.  Even if our current immigration procedures and quotas made any sense and were just, they seem a rather odd choice to fixate on among the many laws that aren't observed very strictly in this country.  Page me when AZ makes speeding a felony, or starts doing extra tax return audits for the IRS because the federal govt just isn't doing a good enough job catching tax cheats.

    And it's not as if the Rs don't have plenty of folks in their ranks who haven't been shy about getting past the rule of law rationalization and just flat out stating that Hispanics need to be kept out because they can't be real Americans.  They will dilute the American character, because that character is essentially Anglo-American.  They can't be trusted to be full, voting, fellow-citizens, however much we tolerate their presence as a source of cheap labor, because we can't trust our future to their inclinations, to their votes.

    Hiassen is right in this, that the only thing likely to move them back in the R direction is the reversal of this stance.  Give the undocumented a reasonable path to citizenship and you're takling back the statement that you don't trust them to be partners in the nation's future.  Nothing else, nothing merely symbolic, like having someone with a Hispanic surname on the ticket, will work.  The only thing that will work is telling the Hispanics, in the deed of giving more of them voting rights, that you accept them as full partner citizens of this country

    There are two problems with making this work for the Rs.  For one thing, a blood libel is not quickly forgotten.  Even if the racist public policy stand has been reversed, there is still the memory of why it was taken in the first place.  Maybe of the Ds suddenly became the Hispanophobic party, taking over for the Rs, Hispanic voters would switch allegiance overnight, but that's not happening.

    More importantly, while the racists in the party might sit still for symbolic concessions, the fact is that there is a big chunk of their base who do not, in fact, at all trust Hispanic voters with the future of America.  They're Rs precisely because they feel this way.  They think that racism is what their party stands for, and anyone in their party who tries to do something substantively anti-racist is going to find him or herself ridden out of R-town on a rail, only confirming for all of us, Hispanic voters included, just what their party is all about.  

    We should have destroyed the presidency before Obama took office. Too late now.

    by gtomkins on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 09:03:31 AM PST

  •  ABH/ABB (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Amber6541, YoungArizonaLiberal

    Anyone but Hillary

    Anyone but Biden

    Hillary will be 68 years old in 2015 -- when she would need to be back in Iowa.  Biden will be even older.  

    The D party cannot run the older candidate, cannot be the party of old, has been politicians.  

    We have to be progressive, and nothing says un-progressive like going back to the well over and over again with the same old faces.  

    Yes, electing Hillary would be electing a female and that looks new and all that

    But elections are not about that

    They are about policy and personality.  I don't want to discuss the Rose Law Firm or the Benghazi situation in 2015 and 2016.  I don't want Hillary to run.  

    Biden should not run either

    The robb'd that smiles steals something from the thief. -- Shakespeare

    by not2plato on Sun Dec 09, 2012 at 10:31:22 AM PST

    •  Couldn't disagree more (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jeremimi

      I've been waiting patiently since 2008 for Hillary to get another shot, and she's the only candidate out there I'm willing to open my wallet and volunteer my time for.

      Do not underestimate the intensity of support she has.  Pushing her aside because of her age will not endear the party to the women (and men like me) who believe she is the most qualified person in the country who has yet to be president.

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