Skip to main content

When I was in middle school we would conduct regular drills for nuclear preparedness. We were “comforted” as a nation that we could survive a nuclear attack by hiding under our desks.

We routinely practiced other exercises that in retrospect were nothing more than busy work and mental diversions. Some of our neighbors spent thousands on bomb shelters. They stocked them with food and water in the event of a nuclear holocaust. This was the era of the Red Scare and we were convinced a nuclear attack was survivable. The Joe McCarthy’s of our day told us the “Commies were coming” and were lurking under every rock. John Kennedy was a hero for staring down Fidel Castro. We have come a long way haven’t we? I don’t believe the fairy tale that Saint Ronnie destroyed the once powerful Soviet Union. My theory is that the international nuclear arms race bankrupted them. My story and I’m sticking with it. That doesn’t keep neocons from occasionally raising the specter of a nuclear Armageddon. Today I am comforted with the notion, maybe a false notion that for the terrorist there is a problem delivering that nuclear device. Yes, the Timothy McVeigh’s still exist and the cowards that hijacked aircraft to destroy the Twin Towers still remind us that improvised weapons of mass destruction are still out there. Yes, it’s still possible, but I don’t hide under my desk every day in fear.

Our children and grandchildren live today with a different arms race taking place today right here in America. It isn’t a nuclear attack, but it is taking its toll on our way of life. We are living in an America that is quickly resembling an armed encampment or worse a war zone in some of our inner cities. We take off our shoes, dispose of any liquids and expose our bodies to a virtual strip search before boarding an airplane. We have surrounded our most precious resources (schools, museums, sports stadiums and libraries) with metal detectors, armed guards and fences with barbed wire. We have enacted laws that allow warrantless wiretaps of our citizens here at home. We have tortured individuals before we have even determined their guilt. We have some of the most pervasive security in place in my lifetime and yet we still witnessed the most heart wrenching mass murders of the youngest in America. This wasn’t a plot by some evil dictator or terrorist organization. Could the increase in suicides in our youth be related to the sense of helplessness that they are destined to live in a world of fear? A world where they are bombarded with propaganda for profit from Fox News, Rush Limbaugh and Glenn Beck. The endless conspiracies that the world is coming to an end if a president is elected whose skin is darker than theirs. A world in which the very atmosphere necessary for our existence is being destroyed by soulless mega corporations run by individuals who apparently have no concern for their children’s future.

As a child at the height of the cold war I was never subjected to the relentless onslaught of disinformation that comes at our next generation in so many venues. Our youngest and most impressionable hear it on the radio, in their music, at concerts, in their video games, at the movies, the Internet, most certainly while they are parked in front of 250 channels of television and ultimately in conversations among their peers. While their parents and adult role models become hopelessly immersed, succumb to the rhetoric and the preaching why do we still wonder “how could this happen”? Media professionals and campaign strategists employ techniques 24/7 once reserved for clandestine interrogations and mental manipulation of political prisoners by the KGB and our CIA. Every advertisement has a subliminal context. Every message and speech a dog whistle to a specific group as a “call to arms”. The black helicopters are coming. Why are surprised when children subjected to these strategies are diagnosed with multiple forms of schizophrenia, become over medicated and simply choose to commit suicide and take others with them rather than face what they perceive as hopeless tomorrow?

The atrocities that “shock our consciousness” today are perpetrated by Americans using legally obtained weapons of mass destruction right here against our most vulnerable and apparently we are “powerless to stop them”. Today we are attempting to have a conversation about gun violence, but we need to have a serious debate about the legacy of violence we will bestow on our next generation. Hiding under my desk was no more effective solution for surviving a nuclear attack than hiding our heads in the sand when we need to resolve our national propensity for violence. More guns will never solve the problem of too many guns no more than more nuclear weapons solved the nuclear threat in my childhood. If this isn’t the time then what unimaginable tragedy will it take for the adults in the room to come to their senses, put politics aside and regain control of our nation?

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Nuclear weapons don't kill people, people kill (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    maybeeso in michigan, oortdust

    people. That's why I should be allowed to possess nuclear warheads for my self defense.

    "Nothing preserves Democracy better than the stupidity of its opponents" - KO

    by buckshot face on Mon Dec 17, 2012 at 07:07:57 PM PST

    •  Exactly. And, if you just had your own nuke, you (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      oortdust

      could take out the other guy before he nuked you.

      Why didn't we think of that before?  Solves everything.

      I shudder to think just how many crazies we have with totally warped worldviews running around trying to make the rest of us conform to their idea of what is right.

      Nothing in the world is more dangerous than a sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. Martin Luther King, Jr.

      by maybeeso in michigan on Mon Dec 17, 2012 at 07:55:17 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  FloridaRedneck - it would seem to me that (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shann

    the entire concept of mutual deterrence worked very well and did make us safer.

    "let's talk about that"

    by VClib on Mon Dec 17, 2012 at 08:32:56 PM PST

    •  Yes, I find M.A.D. revolting, but it worked. I can (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      VClib

      not explain how, but there has never been a nuclear weapons exchange.

      I voted with my feet. Good Bye and Good Luck America!!

      by shann on Tue Dec 18, 2012 at 03:39:08 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Really? Then you would be for helping Iran (0+ / 0-)

      and N. Korea to obtain nuclear weapons to make the world "safer"? Then we should  give every dictator and despot a nuclear device and help fund a missile delivery system for them. We should provide fissile material and directions about how to build a bomb to every gun store owner to sell or give away as door prizes. Makes sense to me. We are engaged in an arms race here that has repeatdly demonstrated who the losers are. Over 30k gun related deaths a year and that will probably exceed any other cause of death by the middle of this decade and the solution is to introduce more personal hand held weapons of mass destruction. Again, makes sense to me. M.A.D. never worked. What worked was responsible leaders finally coming to their senses when they realized that everyone having the capability to destroy the world was a monumental bad idea. That's the very reason we have been quietly securing all the loose nukes worldwide. That makes sense to me. Nobody wants to take away your arsenal, but giving individuals the ability to wreak havoc on our community without some sensible and safe method to make sure these weapons don't fall into the wrong hands is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different outcome. Our current system is not working.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site