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In the past few weeks, I’ve spent some time researching developments relating to an earlier series of posts on the massive growth of the American surveillance state that I published here (for the most part) in 2012. (That short list of posts and related links is available, down below.) I’ll be revisiting this topic in at least one new post over the next few days; and, I’ll provide action links/items in that piece which relate to this story. For now, however, I just wanted to bring some attention to a stunning, must read, MSM article that I stumbled across in the process of doing this new research. It’s in the February 11th edition of Time Magazine: “Drone Home...‘What Happens When Drones Return to America?’” by Lev Grossman.

A few paragraphs down, I’m providing an excerpt from the Time cover story, but I wanted to add a little food for thought with regard to community commentary on this subject, with a lot of help from Rutgers University Professor of Philosophy Jason Stanley, who mentions the fiscal cliff; but, at least in part, his words are just as applicable to the current state of dramatically increased domestic surveillance in our country, IMHO.

Philosopher Kings and Fiscal Cliffs
Jason Stanley
Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University
The Stone (NY Times’ Opinionator blog)
January 31, 2013, 8:15 pm

Plato had a famously dim view of democracy. He regarded politics as a craft, and thought that understanding the essence of a craft is to have expertise. Plato argues that we cannot hope the multitude to achieve expertise in the craft of governing. They are too easily misled by sophists. It followed, for Plato, that democracy must be rejected as a just system of governance. It is “probable that the origins of tyranny are found nowhere else than in the democratic regime.” (“The Republic”). A just system of government must have a philosopher king, who understands the essences of things. Translated into the modern context, Plato’s view is that the only just system of government is one that is run by one or several experts in economics and public policy. The multitude is too easily swayed by propaganda.

Plato was right to regard his views as inconsistent with democracy. His view that citizens are not competent to make judgments about public policy, that economics and policy are areas of expertise like the physician’s, is profoundly undemocratic.

So what is required for a democracy to avoid the threat of “ending in tyranny”? Many theorists have argued that democracy requires an informed citizenry that can engage in reasoned public debate about policy issues. That’s a high standard. A weaker view of the requirements of democracy is defensible, namely that citizens must have a reasonable expectation to recognize when a policy is in their own interests. Plato’s view is undemocratic, because he thinks that even this bar is too high. The multitude will always be tricked by propaganda and false rhetoric into voting against their interests.
In previous columns, I have explored how language is used to sway public opinion and evade reasoned debate.

Naming a bill “The Patriot Act” is a simple example, the thought being that voters would want to re-elect politicians who supported a bill called “The Patriot Act,” even if it went against the public’s actual interests. This is a clear example in which we are confronted with Plato’s problem with democracy. Such uses of rhetoric pose clear dangers to our democracy that are not justified by the situation…

(And with Professor Stanley’s thoughts in mind, here are the links to the definitions of the words, totalitarianism and tyranny, courtesy of Merriam-Webster.)

Now, onto Time Magazine....

Drone Home, ‘What Happens When Drones Return to America?’”
Lev Grossman
Time Magazine
February 11, 2013

A few months ago I borrowed a drone from a company called Parrot. Officially the drone is called an AR.Drone 2.0, but for simplicity's sake, we're just going to call it the Parrot. The Parrot went on sale last May and retails for about $300…

…It's a toy, the robotic equivalent of a house pet. But just as cats and dogs are related to tigers and wolves, the Parrot is recognizably genetically related to some very efficient killers.

Flying a drone, even just a Parrot, makes you realize what a radically new and deeply strange technology drones are. A drone isn't just a tool; when you use it you see and act through it — you inhabit it. It expands the reach of your body and senses in much the same way that the Internet expands your mind. The Net extends our virtual presence; drones extend our physical presence. They are, along with smart phones and 3-D printing, one of a handful of genuinely transformative technologies to emerge in the past 10 years.

They've certainly transformed the U.S. military: of late the American government has gotten very good at extending its physical presence for the purpose of killing people…

…Having transformed war, drones are getting ready to transform peace. A year ago Obama ordered the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to expedite the process of integrating "unmanned aerial vehicles," as drones are primly referred to within the trade, into civilian airspace. Police departments will use them to study crime scenes. Farmers will use them to watch their fields. Builders will use them to survey construction sites. Hollywood will use them to make movies. Hobbyists will use them just because they feel like it. Drones are an enormously powerful, disruptive technology that rewrites rules wherever it goes. Now the drones are coming home to roost…

In a related story this past Thursday, The Electronic Frontier Foundation pointed out that….
… The Federal Aviation Administration has finally released a new drone authorization list. This list, released in response to EFF’s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit, includes law enforcement agencies and universities across the country, and—for the first time—an Indian tribal agency. In all, the list includes more than 20 new entities over the FAA’s original list, bringing to 81 the total number of public entities that have applied for FAA drone authorizations through October 2012…
The reality--as I’ve learned in my latest, basic research and collection of readily available reports, both online and via the MSM--is that there is a widely anticipated/planned, dramatic increase with regard to the use of drones by our government (at all levels: federal, state and municipal) in our society over the next few years. But, as even the cover article in the latest edition of Time, linked above, acknowledges it, while many of these new uses for drone technology are certainly expected (at some future point) to improve the day-to-day lives of those of us on Main Street, those efforts represent a clearly secondary aspect of the many taxpayer-funded implementations of advanced technologies (drones and otherwise)  that are already in use and/or now being implemented throughout our surveillance state.

#            #            #

As promised, here are links to some of my posts from the past year on this subject (with one more to follow over the next few days)…

Compliments of the CIA and Homeland Security: By Next Year, Privacy Will Be History 7/11/12

NYT Lead: U.S. Law Enforcement Made 1.3 Million+ Surveillance Requests Of Cell Carriers In 2011 7/9/12

Police Drone Surveillance Of Virtually Every U.S. Neighborhood Within The Next Five Years? 4/11/12

NYT Lead: ACLU Documents Rampant, Warrantless Phone-Tracking By Police Throughout U.S. 4/1/12

Wired’s Mind-Blowing Scoop On “Stellar Wind” And The “Enormity” of U.S. Domestic Spying 3/17/12

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Comment Preferences

  •  Looks like drones have already come home (14+ / 0-)

    Man hunt for ex-soldier who shot police chief's daughter and killed policeman

    POLICE plan to use spy drones in the hunt for a Rambo-style ex-soldier and policeman who has murdered three people and vowed to kill again.
    Using them to pursue an unsympathetic character like Dorner is a perfect way to get the citizenry to accept drones as a normal part of our lives.

    “The probability that we may fail in the struggle ought not to deter us from the support of a cause we believe to be just.” – Abraham Lincoln

    by Sagebrush Bob on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 11:00:35 PM PST

  •  My Father Used To Teach At The Army War College (7+ / 0-)

    It is accurate to say he wrote the text book on the use of air power during war. He is not a liberal. He HATES drone and thinks they are being used in a manner that isn't representative of our nation.

    My father and I rarely agree on much. We are in agreement here.

    When opportunity calls pick up the phone and give it directions to your house.

    by webranding on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 11:09:10 PM PST

    •  The most disturbing aspect of all this is... (10+ / 0-)

      how seamlessly this new technology is being implemented into American society without debate and consent.

      There are precious few of our elected officials who even speak in public about this issue, which is deeply disturbing, and a telltale sign that we're losing democracy in this country at an alarming rate.

      Even stalwart progressives in Congress like Keith Ellison, Raul Grijalva and Bernie Sanders are all being quiet about it, at least as far as I've been aware of.

      The truth is: drones make killing people too easy and unaccountable. The human element is taken out of the process. It's amoral. And if we don't find some way to stoke debate; it's clear that the bar for drone use in law enforcement will get lower and lower, sooner than we expect.

      How long before drones are used to kill criminal suspects here in the U.S. who are not yet found guilty in a court of law?

      Apparently, the executive branch already has the power. How long before that power is expanded?

      "That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history." ~ Aldous Huxley

      by markthshark on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 11:43:30 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  It's going to be hard fighting against the use (12+ / 0-)

    of drones when even so-called progressives are OK with the President ordering the assassination of American citizens without trial or oversight.

    MSNBC viewers just fine with targeted assassinations of Americans photo targeted.jpg

    “The probability that we may fail in the struggle ought not to deter us from the support of a cause we believe to be just.” – Abraham Lincoln

    by Sagebrush Bob on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 11:37:12 PM PST

  •  The war on terror is being driven by (9+ / 0-)

    instinct-driven people who mainly rely on superficial optics to inform their "thinking."  That is, they are endemically fearful people because "what they see is what they get" and, if they don't see it, it doesn't exist. Which means, since appearances are deceiving, they are often mistaken and that feeds their fears.
    We can't call it paranoia because their mistaken understandings are based on a reality that's just misperceived. I compare it to someone who's color blind and can't tell the difference between red and green? How does such a person navigate when he's not aware of being color blind?
    There's a tribe in the Amazon that has no history beyond what individuals in their cohort have directly experienced. They have no memory of prior generations and they don't use numbers beyond "one" and "many." Presumably, they learn to survive by imitating each other's behaviors. They are also, presumably, not fearful. This is detrimental to them because they trust strangers who arrive and exploit them. "Better safe than sorry" has a practical basis. In the long run, it is better to reject than accept, and to suspect.

    "to secure" is to lock up or tie down. Thus, if we presume that the essence of liberty for a mobile organism is to traverse their natural environment, then security is the antithesis of liberty. It is not a matter of deserts. It is a matter of right. To argue that a desire for security makes one liable to be deprived of liberty is to put the onus for the deprivation on the victim.
    Humans have a propensity to secure stuff; to build houses that hold stuff. Why? I suspect it's because we have memory and locking things up makes them easier to find again as we ourselves move around. Your liberty is in conflict with what I want to own. Of course, people who don't own stuff don't care. Thus, the homeless, in our day and age, represent a threat to ownership.

    Dubya's "ownership society" is of a piece with the security state. Securing the boarders is consistent with the principle of the household. It's just extending the lock up to the whole nation.

    Why have we let the scaredie cats take over the decision role for the U.S.?  That's a good question. I suspect it's just because they offered and insisted they know best. Now that we know they are scared of their own shadows, we need to retire them; tell them to give it a rest and go play golf.

    We organize governments to deliver services and prevent abuse.

    by hannah on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 11:44:26 PM PST

    •  This is a profound statement indeed... (5+ / 0-)
      To argue that a desire for security makes one liable to be deprived of liberty is to put the onus for the deprivation on the victim.
      And one I can't help but think was in the minds of some of our founding fathers. (Benjamin Franklin, for one)

      We need to drastically change the general perception of "feeling safe" in this country to one that doesn't preclude real freedom and liberty.

      It's possible to have both security and freedom, even if our politicians tell us different.

      "That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history." ~ Aldous Huxley

      by markthshark on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 11:59:41 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Another way to put it - the war OF terror is (8+ / 0-)

      being driven by propaganda and lies.  People are afraid of what they government and it's oligarchy controllers tell them to be afraid of.  Old as the hills.  "Americans" use to be terribly afraid of the original terrorists who were vicious bloodthirsty animals - Native Americans.  Then they killed most of them, sent the rest of reservations and are afraid of them no more, as long as they keep quiet.

      "The Global War on Terror is a justification for U.S. Imperialism. It must be stopped."

      by BigAlinWashSt on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 12:11:37 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Blaming the victim comes naturally to people (6+ / 0-)

        who have little or no awareness of themselves. They rely on their instincts and instincts respond to prompts, like a light being switched on and off.
        If seeing a breast prompts a suckling response, it can't be helped.
        If a hole calls for an insertion, it can't be helped.

        Assigning agency to inanimate objects is widespread. Think of interest rates rising and the stock market falling. Blaming the victim is just one symptom of a way of thinking that's inconsistent with the laws of nature. When people we disapprove of do it, we call it "magical thinking."

        We organize governments to deliver services and prevent abuse.

        by hannah on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 01:25:58 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yet 'magical thinking' is also a (7+ / 0-)

          development stage of the brain in early childhood (3-7). We transition to the ability to reliably distinguish between imagination and reality.  Companion stage is 3-5 when a child asks 300 -400 questions a day. They learn all kinds of things (there are MANY shades of the primary colors...). Most importantly, how to question. That answering a question usually raises another one.

          I cringe at the idea of what happens to a brain that gets early religious indoctrination and is reprimanded when ever it asks questions about that subject. I am thinking it is a path to becoming a person who has little or no awareness of self.

          "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

          by Ginny in CO on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 02:49:52 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  There are children who never ask why. (6+ / 0-)

            And they generally can't explain how something happened. I think it's a faulty processing function.
            When we ask how a mistake happened, they offer some explanation because they know it is expected, but if one pays close attention, one notices the explanation doesn't match. I think we sometimes dismiss these responses as lying or efforts to deceive when, in fact, they are signs that some people don't know how or why.

            We organize governments to deliver services and prevent abuse.

            by hannah on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 03:24:49 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  All kinds of variations on the mythical 'norm'. (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              marina, SuWho, hannah, Joieau

              Haven't run across this specific dysfunction for children. Spending more time on politics than other areas I prefer. A kid who never asks why... that is sad.

              Neuroscience has discovered more new information in the last 20 years than in all previous history thanks to new technology. The processing to make good use of it is slow.

              Why questions especially would normally originate from R brain. Combined answers are L. Poor development of the connecting corpus callosum limits the ability to combine the R & L answers and formulate a complicated verbal answer. Faulty processing that could be structural, chemical, developmental, or a combination.

              I fantasize that someday kids will get safe evaluations on the various aspects so teachers and parents can best help their cognitive development.

              "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

              by Ginny in CO on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 04:52:25 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

    •  what do you expect after more than a decade (8+ / 0-)

      of constant paranoia being streamed into your home day in and day out so you fear criminals and you fear minorities and you fear foreigners.  Agoraphobia and Xenophobia has become our national norm

      •  Let's break down the formula… (Rupert Hine) (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        marina, ricklewsive
        It's an interview
        But it's a second take
        There's a questioner
        But your mind's at stake

        It's a room designed
        For propaganda's sake
        He's a rich man now
        There's no escape

        Chorus:
          You can't take it where you're going
          You can't take things where you are
             You can't take it with you
          Let's break down the formula
          Let's switch off the set
             And be glad we finally met

        I could crash… my car
        Through your screen
        I could take a match… to your empire
        And teach you how to dream

        You open the door
        Let me into your home
        You show me how you cry
        You tell me how you scream

        And how you watch
        When you're alone

        [Chorus]

        You can choose any channel
        From your chair
        But I've got a better idea
        Tear up the guide
        Rip down the aerial

        [Chorus]

        Let's play real life
        Let's play real life instead…

        — from the 1980s album Thinkman

        The Dutch kids' chorus Kinderen voor Kinderen wishes all the world's children freedom from hunger, ignorance, and war.

        by lotlizard on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 04:11:30 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  True, but if we can be bunked, they can be (4+ / 0-)

        debunked. :)

        Humans are gregarious. It takes a lot of effort to turn them into isolates.

        However, care needs to be taken that we don't identify the wrong culprits. The Tea Party made that mistake. They recognized that there was extortion coming out of Washington, but they didn't identify the institutional nature of it correctly. The ostentatiously stupid are acting as shills for the real crooks, whose objective is simply to deprive because that's where the power lies.
        That the privileged are exempt is a sign there's extortion going on.
        Making the peons work for the lords, even if only as whipping boys, is an ancient agenda. Nowadays some of them are referred to as "fungible troops."

        We organize governments to deliver services and prevent abuse.

        by hannah on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 04:14:57 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  The average American watches (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bobswern, semiot

      35 hours of television a week.

      Surveys show that people who watch a lot of tv regard the world as much more dangerous than those who don't. (And much more dangerous that it is.)

      Combine this with the Corporate de facto monopoly on narratives; where what is important and not important is decided by a handful of people... and here we are.

      For a long time my sig was "Until we break the de facto monopoly on what we see and hear, we'll keep losing, don't matter what we do."

      There's the crux.


      We live in a nation where doctors destroy health; lawyers, justice; universities, knowledge; governments, freedom; the press, information; religion, morals; and our banks destroy the economy. -- Chris Hedges

      by Jim P on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 09:17:28 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I realize that anecdotes aren't supposed to count, (0+ / 0-)

        but my mother never watched TV, didn't listen to the radio and didn't go to the movies and yet she absorbed all the Republican attitudes and was a self-centered, selfish and mean spirited as they come. She was obstreperous and acquisitative and imitative and considered all her characteristics to be virtues, convinced to her dying day that she was a good person.

        How do people like that get away with serial exploitation? I think mostly it's because the victims don't expect to be attacked and the attackers don't stick around.

        We organize governments to deliver services and prevent abuse.

        by hannah on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 02:00:45 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  The MIC (Military Industrial Complex) is (9+ / 0-)

    pushing this hard while the iron is hot.  There's alot of competition globally.  One of the largest Congressional Caucases, the Unmanned Systems Caucus, states in their mission statement:

    2."Recognize the urgent need to rapidly develop and deploy more Unmanned Systems in support of ongoing civil, military, and law enforcement operations;

    http://unmannedsystemscaucus.mckeon.house.gov/...

    Notice the use of "urgent" and "rapid".  It's an arms race.  Around 80 countries now have drones with over fifty countries having armed drones.  

    The public overwhelming approves of the use of drones in the bogus Global War OF Terror, but is tentative when it comes to their home turf.  A matter of further conditioning and that will change.  I was reading an article about that former cop on the loose in California and some of the comments mentioned how they should be using drones.  

    There's worse to come, the MIC is fifty to one hundred years ahead of what we see now.  It has to be stopped locally, regionally and state wide as seen recently in Seattle.  The federal government is completely in the MIC's pockets.  

    "The Global War on Terror is a justification for U.S. Imperialism. It must be stopped."

    by BigAlinWashSt on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 11:53:34 PM PST

    •  Continuing this break in our regular progam (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lotlizard, marina, bobswern, semiot, SuWho, Trix

      of intelligent discussion, with another source of levity.

      WASHINGTON (The Borowitz Report)—Citing budgetary concerns, the United States announced today that it would discontinue regular Saturday drone strikes on U.S. citizens, beginning in 2014.

      In announcing the decision, the White House spokesman Jay Carney acknowledged that the cutback in drone service was “bound to be controversial.” “In the United States, we’ve always prided ourselves on our ability to target our citizens with drone strikes, Monday through Saturday, regardless of the weather,” he said. “We know that losing Saturday drone service is going to take some getting used to.”

      But the move to cut back drone service drew sharp criticism from a longtime defender of the program, the former Vice-President Dick Cheney. “Like most Americans, I thought I’d never see the day when drones just up and take Saturdays off,” he said. “This would never be happening if I were still President.”

      As if to silence critics, Mr. Carney assured reporters that drones could “still get the job done” Monday through Friday, and reminded U.S. citizens to update the government on any change of address so the drones would know where to reach them.

      http://www.newyorker.com/...

      Because I was lying in bed with thoughts on drones, Dorner, and DC dummies swirling too much to sleep; I came to the GOS and landed right back in all the concepts my brain had been mulling over.

      Carry on.

      "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

      by Ginny in CO on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 03:18:32 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  they're already here (6+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jlynne, Ginny in CO, marina, bobswern, semiot, SuWho

    and they will be used. The only question is how they will be used.

    As with other technologies, they have too many useful applications for people to forswear them. They will save many large organizations a lot of money and manpower, and that will be the ultimate argument in their favor.

    All technologies have the potential for abuse. We just have to learn how to live with them. There's no putting the genie back into the bottle.

    Of course, there is nothing like a genuine debate on the proper use of drones and what the proper legal controls should be. They are simply introducing drones one step at a time to get us accustomed to the idea, until it's a fait accompli. And then the 1% will simply decide on our behalf what is a proper use and what not.

    Each time there is another 9/11 or other sort of crisis, it will be used as a pretext for drones to be introduced en masse. For instance, after Hurricane Sandy, utility companies started investing more in drones to help them monitor power lines for damage.

    No, the drones are coming all right.

    "In America, the law is king." --Thomas Paine

    by limpidglass on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 12:35:25 AM PST

    •  We can imagine awful scenarios (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bobswern, SuWho

      like pedophiles with drones, spying on children, rapists using them to locate vulnerable targets, burglary rings casing properties for valuables. Private conversations and scenes being intercepted, maybe even broadcast. (Reality tv takes on new meaning.) These possibilities should be talked about so that even the dimwitted understand.

      There's real reason to fear these things, and I don't mind drumming it up among honest citizens if it will help stop the drones.

      In addition, we can hope technology will provide some kind of jamming device....

    •  There isn't (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      snoopydawg

      any question how they will be used.

      After all, how have the FBI and CIA been used and abused over the years?

      Drones are the same thing--just a different method.

      The banks have a stranglehold on the political process. Mike Whitney

      by dfarrah on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 06:59:43 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I wonder (6+ / 0-)

    whether drones will qualify for 2nd Amendment protections?  Certainly they can be weapons.  And I'd like to have one to spy on Washington.

    "None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free." - Goethe

    by jlynne on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 12:36:45 AM PST

  •  in watching comments on Chris Dorner and his (8+ / 0-)

    rampage, I am struck by the willingness of the public, should he be spotted driving down an interstate, to have a drone "take him out".  It is touted as a perfect solution as he will resist arrest, injuring or killing more law enforcement and this will allow him to be killed with a minimum of risk to law enforcement or civilians.

    Taken in context this view is not as insane as it may seem.  Militarization of police depts is well documented with Sheriff Arpaio perhaps being the most famous with his raid on a chicken farm with an armored vehicle and former movie and tv star in tow.   Police depts are supposedly already using unarmed drones so how long before they wish to use armed drones (and robots) to do the really dangerous tasks?

    At the same time, we have seen an expansion of the willingness of our Administration to use military drones to assassinate people deemed to be threats to the US, even US citizens, so how long before this doctrine is expanded to include domestic as well as foreign hits?  

    •  Silly Elliot Ness, going through all that trouble (7+ / 0-)

      … to get Al Capone actually arrested, charged, and tried on tax evasion. "Everyone knew" he was a senior leader of the "Al Qapone" criminal organization.

      Nowadays they could just kill him and be done with it. It doesn't seem to bother folks any more if the government operates the same way Capone did. "Hey, my consigliore draws up a kill list, we talk about it on Tuesdays, then I sign off on it . . . ."

      The Dutch kids' chorus Kinderen voor Kinderen wishes all the world's children freedom from hunger, ignorance, and war.

      by lotlizard on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 04:25:42 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  "Eco-terrorists"* and peaceniks beware! (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bobswern, Heart of the Rockies, SuWho

      The meaning of "imminence" has been expanded to include soooooo much more than previously legally defined.

      *So-called terrorists, snark intended

    •  I posted a link to this story... (0+ / 0-)

      ...from Alternet, up above: HERE IT IS, again.

      "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

      by bobswern on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 07:01:40 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  very soon I fear... (0+ / 0-)

      ...imho, perhaps right after a "national emergency", look for any false flag not backed by incontravertible, independent evidence to the contrary that no reasonable person can say fails to pass the coo koo clock conspiracy theory threshhold test, a mass confiscation of all firearms and ammunition, in order to "keep us safe", of course. READ: NPSD-51 /  HSPD-20.  A good primer on totalitarianism and police state: The 1933 Enabling Act.

      "I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast, for I intend to go in harm's way." John Paul Jones

      by ImpeachKingBushII on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 03:27:43 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Drones will be used to provide peace? (5+ / 0-)

    That's rather Orwellian, I think.  Gee thanks, Time mag.

    I really wonder how long this will last.

    Hobbyists will use them just because they feel like it.


    "Justice is a commodity"

    by joanneleon on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 04:36:37 AM PST

  •  bob (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bobswern, marina

    thanks for the reference to Jason Stanley at Rutgers.  I told my son to look him up and see if he has any undergrad courses.


    "Justice is a commodity"

    by joanneleon on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 04:37:25 AM PST

  •  When I saw the (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bobswern, chrississippi, SuWho

    movies Brazil and Terminator [2 or 3], I just thought, "how awful."

    And here we are.

    The banks have a stranglehold on the political process. Mike Whitney

    by dfarrah on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 06:49:38 AM PST

  •  It's the Quaker Grandparents planning (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bobswern, SuWho

    peace demonstrations you really have to watch out for.


    We live in a nation where doctors destroy health; lawyers, justice; universities, knowledge; governments, freedom; the press, information; religion, morals; and our banks destroy the economy. -- Chris Hedges

    by Jim P on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 09:21:51 AM PST

  •  Plato was ahead of his time... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bobswern

    ...To our founding fathers the terms "freedom" and "liberty" had real meaning. They knew that just talking about rebellion was committing treason against the Crown, and they had to either put up or shut up. They knew first-hand the hemp ropes that King George III's regulars had for them were not just for smoking!

    Today, we have laws like the "Patriot Act" which has nothing to do with patriotism, and everything to do with what the founders risked everything that meant anything to them in this world to erase from these shores: TYRANNY!

    I was so relentless in search of the truth, before the ink was dry on it, I read that convoluted, sinister wolf in sheep's clothing 5 times! Be careful what you wish for, because the truth may set you free or it may just give you enough facts to make you "dangerous" enough to the established powers that be, to land you thousands of miles from America in an Abu Ghraib-style prison clasped in chains and shackled to a wall, your only company the concrete block they tied to your hands!

    "I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast, for I intend to go in harm's way." John Paul Jones

    by ImpeachKingBushII on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 03:09:21 PM PST

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