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This past Sunday, the Grammy Awards took place.  One of the "side" categories is, as you might expect, classical, with one modest bit of coverage on the Grammy Awards' site here.  Given that everyone goes on about how the CD is dying out, not to mention concerns about recording piracy through file sharing and burning discs, in classical music-land, one wonders why orchestras and other classical artists keep on keeping on with trying to make, never mind sell, recordings of mostly the same core repertoire over and over.

Of course, being a loser, I don't have the answer to that question.  But a few recent examples of two orchestras still going on with the recording game feature in this diary.  One involves The Philadelphia Orchestra and its new music director, Yannick Nézet-Séguin (YNS for short).  The other involves a group a bit closer to home, namely these folks, where if you catch this diary before 9 PM CST, you can actually hear via the internets the work being recorded commercially.  The whole concert starts at 8 PM CST, but the work for the recording starts a bit after 9 PM, where the composer is actually in town (yup, music by a live guy from a symphony orchestra - will wonders never cease).  More below the flip.....

First, regarding the Fabulous Philadelphians and their return to the commercial classical recording market, the orchestra's official press release is here.  David Patrick Stearns has this article from the Philadelphia Inquirer about this recording news.  YNS and the orchestra are planning to record, for the German label Deutsche Grammophon (DG), Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring (Le sacre du printemps) along with 3 arrangements of J.S. Bach for orchestra by Leopold Stokowski, who was music director in Philadelphia for a bit over 25 years, starting in 1912.  We certainly don't lack for recordings of either set of selections now, particularly Sacre (of which more in a moment), although Stokowski arrangements of JSB aren't quite so thick on the ground these days in CD and record shops.

Normally these days with classical recordings, the idea is to record the live concert performances of a given work and mash together the good parts, with a touch-up recording session to clean out bits like applause after the end.  However, according to DPS, the DG set-up apparently is going for broke, in more ways than one:

"The recording conditions promise to be optimum: Rather than editing together live concerts, as most American orchestras do, the music will be recorded under more expensive studio conditions at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall for release later this year."
While I'm pretty ignorant of how much orchestra musicians get paid for studio time for recordings, my general sense is that those fees are pretty hefty.  This was from back in the heyday of classical music on record, when recordings were plentiful (as was audience demand) and the classical music record industry had boatloads of money.  But that was then.  That makes this next bit in DPS' article interesting to think about:
"The orchestra declined to discuss numbers or the nature of its agreement with Deutsche Grammophon (nicknamed in the industry "the yellow label"). [Jeremy Rothman, the orchestra's VP for artistic planning] would say the arrangement had financial support from the recording company but was also possible thanks to 'a great deal of interest and flexibility from our players...to find the best conditions for the hall and for the ensemble.'"
Probable translation; reduced studio time fees compared to the past.  However, given that they're going from a status of no recent recording to one of the big prestige labels still out there, one takes what one can get.  DPS notes briefly the orchestra's past history of recording with earlier music directors (and in the case of Charles Dutoit, chief conductor):
"Though past music directors Stokowski, Eugene Ormandy and Riccardo Muti recorded with the orchestra for a variety of labels, the orchestra was without a recording presence for much of Wolfgang Sawallisch's era (1993-2003), recorded intermittently for the Ondine label under Christoph Eschenbach (2003-2008), and hardly at all under Charles Dutoit (2008-2012)."
So in one sense, part of the reason for an orchestra to make recordings with each of its music directors is legacy, since without audio recordings, all we have are memories.  Recordings are a distortion of actually being in the hall, of course, but for distant past times, that's all that we have for the present day.  

One result of that is, of course, many, many recordings out there of a single given work.  In the case of The Rite, in this post on the NYT's ArtsBeat blog, Daniel J. Wakin also noted the past competition that YNS and the Philadelphians will be up against:

"The Rite is not exactly under-represented on disc: Decca recently released a box set of 37 [sic] recordings of the work."
BTW, the box set that Wakin refers to is this one, and it's actually 38 recordings of the work, 35 orchestral, 3 of the piano-duet version.  But that aside, in the comments section, 'jim' from Boston put his finger on the key subtext behind the point that I made earlier:
"It's great that a major American orchestra will actually be recorded by a major label, but given this, now unique, opportunity couldn't they have come up with something a little more adventurous? "The Rite of Spring" is a masterpiece and there are already many, many excellent and thrilling performances available. Another recording is not likely to get much attention for the Philadelphia or Mr. Nézet-Séguin."
Well, actually, I beg to differ a little, given all the hype that has attended to YNS in the past few years, as his career has really taken off.  If nothing else, local demand will be pretty decent, by classical standards.  Plus, in the case of The Philadelphia Orchestra, they went through a nasty recent period of bankruptcy, the most prominent major US orchestra ever to go through Chapter 11.  It's not hard to imagine a lot of hard feelings from the orchestra towards the management.  However, if someone like YNS can be the knight in shining armor to help right the ensemble towards a firmer footing, recordings can be one aspect of that.

But this raises the larger bean-counter question of sales, where in the pop world, Beyonce or Lady Gaga can sell millions of albums in a day.  By contrast, in classical land, a recording is lucky if it sells 1000 copies in one year, by my rough back-of-the-envelope guess.  This may be more of a problem when a given new recording is yet another recording of Beethoven symphonies, or Carmina Burana, or Tchaikovsky or Mahler.  This brings me to the second orchestra continuing to keep a toe in commercial classical recording, namely the local group here, the St. Louis Symphony (SLSO).  There are two key differences in the recording projects under consideration between Philly and the 'Lou:

(a) The work that the SLSO will be recording is John Adams' City Noir, for Nonesuch Records.  Nonesuch has a blog post about the recording project here, which states in part:

"Nonesuch Records returns to Powell Hall in St. Louis, Missouri, this weekend to record the St. Louis Symphony's performances of John Adams's City Noir, conducted by Music Director David Robertson, this Friday and Saturday, February 15 and 16. John Adams will be in attendance for the recording."
But there's a bonus if you're not in STL, or in STL and are not going to the concert tonight, namely that:
"The Saturday evening performance will also be broadcast live as part of the regular STL Symphony broadcast series on St. Louis Public Radio, 90.7-KWMU, and streamed live at stlpublicradio.org."
Hence this is yet another autobot posting from 3CM (loser, he), so that he's not actually around to respond to comments at this moment.  In addition, as Post-Dispatch classical critic Sarah Bryan Miller noted in this blog post off the Post-Dispatch's "Culture Club" blog:
"Adams...[will] do the pre-concert talk both nights with Robertson and then take in the performance from the audience."
So if you have the choice between:

(a) Stay at home to do SNLC, or:
(b) 'Meet the composer' at the symphony, in what looks like a really nice program:

Any wonder why 3CM isn't at the SNLC fort presently? ;-P  But 3CM digresses, as usual.

The point here is that this recording of City Noir will be the first commercial recording of this work.  Adams is also scheduled to write a new saxophone concerto to be performed this coming October, again per Nonesuch's blogpost:

"Additionally, Nonesuch will be back in Powell Hall during the St. Louis Symphony's 2013–14 season to record the October 5 and 6, 2013, performances of a new John Adams concerto written for saxophone, a St. Louis Symphony co-commission and local premiere. The concerto and City Noir will be combined and released by Nonesuch Records at a future date."
This is actually a perfect example of the kind of classical recording that should be made nowadays, namely of new music with the composer around to help with the process, so that audiences beyond the concert hall who probably won't have the chance to hear this new work live any time soon, if ever, can give it a listen.  

(FWIW, the first Nonesuch recording of John Adams' music with the SLSO and conductor David Robertson is at ~100,000 ranking on Amazon.com's sales, which isn't that bad for a classical CD these days not in its 1st run.)

I actually heard the BBC Proms internet transmission of City Noir this past July, which was Prom 4.  To be honest, I didn't think that it was Adams' best work, and was kind of diffuse.  (The local critic kind of thought the same thing from her review of the concert yesterday morning.)  However, the kids from Juilliard and the Royal Academy of Music were clearly having a blast, as Adams was as conductor.  

At the time of this autobot posting, I'm actually at the hall now.  If any of you read this in time, you can listen in via the KWMU site to the concert.  Or until I get back to respond to any comments and spread DK mojo, you can observe the usual SNLC protocol, namely your loser stories of the week.  (Thought I forgot, didn't you?)

Originally posted to chingchongchinaman on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 05:00 PM PST.

Also republished by Community Spotlight.

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Comment Preferences

  •  so anyone going to listen to the concert? (14+ / 0-)

    It would be interesting if anyone here actually follows the links and goes for it.  (Um, yeah, right.....)

    Anyway, from here, not so much a loser story as a sort of dilemma-type thing:  a friend (sort of an ex) recently took care of the cats while I was out for a few days, which was nice.  I did surmise that she used the washer and dryer to do a load of laundry while I was away.  (She cleaned the lint.)  She didn't ask permission, but then she declined when I offered to pay her for kitteh care.  I would have said "yes" had she asked about using the washer and dryer.  So the question is:  do I mention it next time I meet up with her, or let it slide?  (I'm supposed to take care of her kittehs at some point.)  My inclination is the latter, but still.....

    "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

    by chingchongchinaman on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 04:32:41 PM PST

  •  The new hot shot in Phil. usurp (8+ / 0-)

    Dudamel. He conducted the opera "Angels in America" in LA. Fine musician.

    Emerson St . Qt. has a new recording deal w/Sony.

    I heard the BBC Orch. Last night. Fine playing.

  •  hi (6+ / 0-)

    Not much going on here except leaving the cave which is always fun.  It comes in clumps.

    We went to the tax lady, yesterday, and then brought a deep dish pizza home.

    Today, we took my youngest son and his wife and three grandbabies out for a belated birthday dinner which was fun.  We will see them again on Tuesday and the next week again for the little one's two year old birthday.

    Tomorrow, we will meet hubby's nice brother and sister-in-law for dinner an hour's drive each way, if the snow is not too bad.

    My only complaint is that my feet and back will really be in trouble, tomorrow.  I usually need rest days in between fun times.  So, off for a nap, right now..

    Best wishes to everyone here!!!

    Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

    by cfk on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 05:49:41 PM PST

    •  hmm, reminds me that I haven't yet..... (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      oculus, Youffraita, cfk, RiveroftheWest

      .....started on my taxes.  Need to start the ritual fairly soon, i.e. 1st time by hand, wait a few days, redo them and find mistakes, repeat as often as needed.  Hope your rest time works out OK.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 08:57:06 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Here is a wonderful webpage (5+ / 0-)

    w/links to concerts recorded live @ the Gardner Museum in Boston. I am working my way through the extensive repertoire of pianist Jeremy Denk.

    link

  •  i forgot until tonight (7+ / 0-)

    i need to wash the acolyte's robe and make a new purificator.  (that's the little white cloth used w/ the communion cup) ((aka chalice)).  

    i should also google for linen, local stores are sold out.  of the proper white shade of handkerchief weight.  

    Ted Kennedy: “The work goes on, the cause endures, the hope still lives, and the dream shall never die…”

    by jlms qkw on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 06:01:51 PM PST

  •  CCC dude... Have I got advice for you. (6+ / 0-)

    Your previous diaries about dating girls who like bad boys and being stuck as their friend have been heard.

    This is called THE DENNIS system.  It was on It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia the other day.  I saw this and I thought of you right away.

    •  This is very bad of you, Dumbo :) (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chingchongchinaman, Dumbo

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 07:48:54 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  OMG, that's just evil... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chingchongchinaman, Dumbo, cfk

      but very, very funny.

      Irony takes a worse beating from Republicans than Wile E. Coyote does from Acme. --Tara the Antisocial Social Worker

      by Youffraita on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 10:45:09 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  a show I've never seen..... (0+ / 0-)

      .....but I can kind of understand why you posted this.  Really, this guy's a sleaze, unless the whole scene is a fantasy and he's just deluding himself.  How did the rest of the episode turn out?  (No need to post a video, a summary will do.)

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 11:50:57 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  It was very funny. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        chingchongchinaman

        You can rent episodes on DVD, I suspect, if you don't have cable.  

        Dennis goes back to the pharmacy with another fake prescription.  She is more skeptical this time and tells him that she doesn't believe he HAS a grandmother and that, besides, the doctor's name on the prescription doesn't exist.  Dennis slinks away saying, "Oh, well, that fake doctor could get a guy like me in trouble!  But I do have a grandmother!"

        Meanwhile, Frank (Danny Devito) and Charlie (Charlie Day) both show up in the pharmacy.  Dennis inquires what they are doing there.  They inform him that they are used to following him around picking up his discards and they've been doing it for a while.  Frank has a package of magnum condoms and hundred dollar bills sticking out of his pants pocket.  Charlie and Frank argue about who gets seconds and who gets thirds.

        Meanwhile, Dee has a date with a guy that she doesn't understand is retarded.  He is very kind and sweet to her.  But having heard the DENNIS system explained, she is paranoid as hell and accuses him of trying to make her dependent on him and manipulate her.

        Charlie, meanwhile, shows up at the house of the girl that he has a crush on and who has a restraining order against him.  She discovers he has broken into her apartment with a wrench and a bag full of hair and that he's trying to sabotage her pipes.  She tells him to get out, then asks him is he doing what she thinks?  He explains that he's trying to Demonstrate His Value to her by FIXING her pipes.  She doesn't understand what he's talking about and kicks him out, after revealing that she is working at the fairgrounds now.

        They all meet back at the bar, where Dennis comes up with a new plan that will fix everybody's problem.  His brother Ronald will ask her to go to the fair with him.  The rest of them all go to the fair as well, Dennis pushing a senile old woman in a wheelchair that can only mumble something about how her mother was Susan B. Anthony's lover.  He "bumps" into the pharmacy girl and his brother and introduces them to his sick grandmother.

        Dee's part of the grand plan is to bring her retarded boyfriend to the fair and demonstrate her dominance in the relationship by making out with one of the carnies in front of him.

        Meanwhile, Charlie approaches the ball-throwing booth managed by the girl he has a crush on who hates him.  

        Dee approaches a creepy looking carnie next to the booth and comes on to him in front of her boyfriend.  He stabs her.  "You stabbed me!"  He tells her that that guy over there, Charlie, paid him to stab her.

        She yells at Charlie about this in front of the girl he has a crush on, "You paid somebody to stab me?"  Charlie explains, no, you don't understand, he was supposed to try to stab this girl here!  And he was going to save her.  The girl working the booth is horrified by this.  "You paid somebody to stab me?"  Charlie rambles about how, no, he was going to save her before that could happen and that it's all part of Dennis's "Plan" based on the DENNIS system, and it all comes out.  

        Dee's retarded boyfriend dumps her, telling her that she's not very nice.

        The pharmacy girl hears this, and becomes confused, growing towards furious, and demands an explanation, which Dennis starts.

        Then Frank (Danny Devito) shows up.  He was supposed to pretend to be the carnie (the one that stabbed the other girl), but, jealous of always getting "thirds," he has changed the plan, and approaches Dennis and the pharmacy girl in the role of the doctor that she suspected didn't exist.  Boasting of how much money he makes as a doctor, he informs her that he also treats Dennis for Aids.  Dennis is furious about this, and they further argue about how this isn't part of the plan.  Then Frank "accidentally" spills some magnum condoms on the ground in front of the pharmacy girl and starts picking them up.

        Pretty good for thirty minutes.

        •  the words..... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Dumbo

          ......'French farce' come to mind, in terms of plot complications, albeit w/o doors slamming and with a lot more vulgar language and situations.

          "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

          by chingchongchinaman on Mon Feb 18, 2013 at 12:39:10 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  I'm reminded of another recording of Sacre (5+ / 0-)

    This one by James Levine conducting the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra. it was spectacular, and DG released it too, in the late '90s.  Don't new interpretations deserve to be heard?

    -7.75, -8.10; . . . Seneca Falls, Selma and Stonewall (h/t cooper888)

    by Dave in Northridge on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 07:16:16 PM PST

    •  What is your estimate of the number of (4+ / 0-)

      Live performances of "Le Sacre" during this anniversary year?

      The Joffery did their reconstruction in L . A. Recently. Sorry I missed it b

      •  great question; if I had to guess, I'd guess..... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Youffraita, oculus, RiveroftheWest

        .....in the low triple digits, as it's not hard to imagine just about every major orchestra doing it.  But it would require a lot of research to look at both this season and next with a slew of orchestras.  I suppose there must be a website somewhere dedicated to collating the list, but I'm too lazy to Google it now.

        "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

        by chingchongchinaman on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 09:33:07 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  oh, of course, absolutely (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Youffraita, RiveroftheWest

      It's always great to renew the core repertoire with fresh points of view, although as time moves along farther from the origins of the work (we're at 100 years this year for Sacre, of course), I kind of wonder that freshness gets harder and harder as works become more standard.

      I haven't heard the Levine/Met Opera Orch. recording of Sacre, although it is in that mega-box set of 38 performances mentioned above.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 09:12:47 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Here's an online link that works... (4+ / 0-)

    Remember: the same Defense Department that was apparently caught completely off-guard by sequestration is the same Defense Department that's responsible for America's defense.

    by here4tehbeer on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 07:23:33 PM PST

    •  did you get a chance to listen? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Youffraita, RiveroftheWest

      I'll admit that the mixed bag impression of the new Adams work was reinforced hearing it in 3D, as opposed to 2D via the intertubes last year.  But at least I'm glad that the SLSO got picked to make the recording.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 09:44:57 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I recorded the stream; haven't had a chance (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        chingchongchinaman

        to listen to the whole thing yet, but what little I heard through my laptop speakers I enjoyed :)

        Remember: the same Defense Department that was apparently caught completely off-guard by sequestration is the same Defense Department that's responsible for America's defense.

        by here4tehbeer on Sun Feb 17, 2013 at 06:10:41 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  feel free also to check out the..... (0+ / 0-)

          ......video that I have the link to down below from here, with Adams conducting the work in Amsterdam a little over 2 years ago.

          "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

          by chingchongchinaman on Mon Feb 18, 2013 at 12:40:58 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  No loser story from me this week. I am sorry that (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    chingchongchinaman, Youffraita, cfk

    I did not find this to listen to the webcast until it was over. Am tired. Off to le sack early tonight.

    if a habitat is flooded, the improvement for target fishes increases by an infinite percentage...because a habitat suitability index that is even a tiny fraction of 1 is still infinitely higher than zero, which is the suitability of dry land to fishes.

    by mrsgoo on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 08:33:22 PM PST

    •  "City Noir" off YT..... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Youffraita

      .....available from the following, about 1:27:06 into the video.  The applause at the start after a portion of the speechifying is in the light of the right-wing Dutch government's massive budget cuts to Dutch radio, in particular the live music divisions.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 09:49:33 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  That! Was totally not loser like! Thank You for (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        chingchongchinaman

        the link. I really enjoyed it. Do not understand Dutch but I hear a lot of California and Los Angeles mentioned at the end.

        if a habitat is flooded, the improvement for target fishes increases by an infinite percentage...because a habitat suitability index that is even a tiny fraction of 1 is still infinitely higher than zero, which is the suitability of dry land to fishes.

        by mrsgoo on Mon Feb 18, 2013 at 12:18:39 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  from at least the beginning..... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          mrsgoo

          .....this concert is part of the commemorations of what appears to be the anniversary of the Saturday morning concert series by Dutch Radio at the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam.  There's also a lot of thanks to the audience for their support, and also a wish that the voices of protest will be heard in The Hague (Den Haag), the national capital, of course.  (You can guess that I haven't watched the whole video yet.)

          "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

          by chingchongchinaman on Mon Feb 18, 2013 at 12:42:57 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I started it at the beginning and decided that (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            chingchongchinaman

            since I did not understand Dutch, I would skip to the 1:27 mark. Watched it from there to the end. Clarinets were under-represented (sigh) while the violins and french horns seemed to take center stage. There was a nice oboe and trumpet solo. But being a clarinet player as a kid, I am butt hurt. LOL!!

            if a habitat is flooded, the improvement for target fishes increases by an infinite percentage...because a habitat suitability index that is even a tiny fraction of 1 is still infinitely higher than zero, which is the suitability of dry land to fishes.

            by mrsgoo on Mon Feb 18, 2013 at 01:41:09 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  Understudied 3C SN@TO and got 0 comments (3+ / 0-)

    which is a loser of a loser story since it has been done many times before. What is more loser-ish is that I had blocked in out in advance based on the expectations that I would really really hate it and not hating it at all, had to start all over again.
    Except who would believe a Rookie Reviewer who loved an opera that all the Major Leaguers disliked?

    Plus, I had promised all the nice Italian ladies in the row behind me that I would register their complaint that the curse was written out of story and a mafioso, or to be fair, a Meyer Lansky, would have been much better than an Arab Sheik, who was definitely a non-starter as the power behind a curse.

    3C's other underfrequented diary except not by 3C

    "Are you bluish? You don't look bluish," attributed to poet Roger Joseph McGough, for the Beatles' Yellow Submarine (1968).

    by BlueStateRedhead on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 08:57:17 PM PST

    •  I listened to most of today's (3+ / 0-)

      radio broadcast. Sounded fine.

    •  sorry I found your diary late, i.e. just now (3+ / 0-)

      It now has 2 comments.  You can maybe edit it to insert a "Did you see it today?" poll, which is another regular feature.  Plus, since you put it up not that long ago, the Rescue Rangers might catch it on the next go around.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 10:41:01 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  You got a rec from me! (3+ / 0-)

      No comment b/c all I did before reading your post was read the NYT review of it, and I'm not exactly an opera buff so I don't know the original, either.

      If I hadn't done the hover thing & seen from your first sentence what your post was about, I probably wouldn't have clicked at all -- I didn't know there was a Saturday Night at the Opera (except for what 3CM writes, natch) so SN@TO meant nothing to me.

      But I definitely enjoyed your post.

      Irony takes a worse beating from Republicans than Wile E. Coyote does from Acme. --Tara the Antisocial Social Worker

      by Youffraita on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 10:53:25 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thanks oh so very much, a fellow non-buff espec. (2+ / 0-)

        I am not even close to being a buff, or even a novice buff. so am I writing for the people who are fascinating but also befuddled by the fuss. If you then enjoyed it, I found just the right reader, the one I imagined writing for. Oh heart's delight and in valentlne's week, too.

        "Are you bluish? You don't look bluish," attributed to poet Roger Joseph McGough, for the Beatles' Yellow Submarine (1968).

        by BlueStateRedhead on Sun Feb 17, 2013 at 08:51:34 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  makes it even better..... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          BlueStateRedhead

          .....to bring in more people.  FWIW, if all goes to plan, I can diary the March 2 HD-cast of Parsifal.  But it's going to be tight that day.

          "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

          by chingchongchinaman on Mon Feb 18, 2013 at 12:43:57 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  march 2 not likely for.me. seek alternate buffs (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            chingchongchinaman

            Parsifal notnmy cup of tea or glaas of reisling or stein of beer anyway. Nyt article up this am fyi

            "Are you bluish? You don't look bluish," attributed to poet Roger Joseph McGough, for the Beatles' Yellow Submarine (1968).

            by BlueStateRedhead on Mon Feb 18, 2013 at 05:27:30 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  the tight schedule is because of...... (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              BlueStateRedhead

              .......the sheer length of the opera, of course, and because I'll be @ the symphony that night (duh), which leaves very little time to pen the impressions of the HD-cast.  I might be able to write a chunk of it in advance, if I get my act together.  (Of course, if I had my act together, I wouldn't be a loser.  Talk about circular logic.)

              "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

              by chingchongchinaman on Mon Feb 18, 2013 at 10:31:22 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  My actogether made me a loser; your risk? (0+ / 0-)

                When the rookie reviewer who finds that she and more importantly, her focus group of Italian American ladies in the row behind her (who after all are legacy members of the Verdi-lovers club) loved the opera except for the SNAFU of the curse, while the reviewers on whom she had based her act togethering draft had at best just tolerated the opera the actogether made her a loser.

                Siegfried as risky a business? Wagner still have his cult members outside of Bayreuth?

                "Are you bluish? You don't look bluish," attributed to poet Roger Joseph McGough, for the Beatles' Yellow Submarine (1968).

                by BlueStateRedhead on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 07:16:04 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

  •  So CCCM, how was the concert? (3+ / 0-)
    •  it was all right (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Youffraita, oculus, RiveroftheWest

      Program notes are here.  The Copland was a relatively gentle warm-up, as you can imagine.  Orli was very, very good in the Bernstein, although the piece seemed a touch diffuse.  I suddenly realized that I don't think that I'd ever heard LB's The Age of Anxiety, even on record, or I certainly don't remember it.  I might even be motivated to dig up the poem at some point.

      The Adams was rather loud and brash, with Robertson clearly having a good time, but I thought that the quieter and slower moments were more effective, if only because they were less cluttered, by default.  The saxophonist was excellent, and it'll be interesting to see him in the fall with the new concerto.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 10:54:51 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Hello, everyone! (4+ / 0-)

    Nothing particularly loserly to write about this week, just the usual stuff: shitty job, lousy pay, yadda yadda yadda.

    The Philly orchestra played recently (within the past month) in NYC, I think Carnegie Hall, and got a terrific review from the Times.  It's nice to see Philly making a comeback.

    Longer ago, the local orchestra here played in Philly, and got lots of ... press?  Well: attention anyway from WRTI.  I think WRTI was broadcasting the performance live.  It would, of course, have been while I was at work: these things always are.

    I don't think our local orchestra in any way ranks with the storied Philadelphia Orchestra.  Maybe Philly O was out of town, and they needed some second-raters to fill in the gap.

    Irony takes a worse beating from Republicans than Wile E. Coyote does from Acme. --Tara the Antisocial Social Worker

    by Youffraita on Sat Feb 16, 2013 at 11:01:20 PM PST

    •  heard this concert via the..... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Youffraita, RiveroftheWest

      ......intertubes.  It struck me as good, if not earth-shatteringly wonderful.  It seems that the good folk of NYC want to see the orchestra come back, so the crowd in the hall and the critics are going to be nice, unless outright disaster dictates otherwise.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sun Feb 17, 2013 at 12:01:32 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  It is true that (3+ / 0-)

        the NYT Arts section has paid very close attention to the Philly O during and after its Chapter 11.

        Perhaps they see it as a cautionary tale?

        Philly is also the closest city with a major orchestra.  I mean, by Amtrak, it's less than two hours, and if Congress allows the tracks to be upgraded to high-speed rail, it would be less than the amount of time to get from either NYC or Philly to either airport: I mean, high-speed rail on THAT corridor would make air travel obsolete.

        So there might perhaps be some sister-city feelings there, on the part of the NYT music critics.

        But...Philly's orchestra was a major player for most of the twentieth century and it would be a shame for it to disappear, and I think that too is part of the rah-rah from NYC.

        Don't you?

        Irony takes a worse beating from Republicans than Wile E. Coyote does from Acme. --Tara the Antisocial Social Worker

        by Youffraita on Sun Feb 17, 2013 at 12:13:10 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  it's also the fact that the NYT arts pages..... (0+ / 0-)

          ......are the biggest forum amongst US papers for the arts, even though in principle, anyone can search any local newspaper for stories about The Philadelphia Orchestra's bankruptcy situation a while back, or the current disaster with the Minnesota Orchestra now.  As well, The Philadelphia Orchestra has been a regular part of the Carnegie Hall series for years now, and it would be terrible if that were to be lost.

          Plus, if nothing else, orchestras in different cities aren't like sports teams, at least in any sort of overt rivalry :) .

          "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

          by chingchongchinaman on Mon Feb 18, 2013 at 12:46:28 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Carnegie Hall is better than Avery Fisher (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chingchongchinaman

      I heard both the Philadelphia Orchestra and the New York Philharmonic in the same week a couple years ago. Both orchestras have had conductor changes since then, but I was most impressed with the sound in Philadelphia in the Verizon hall.

      I thought the sound in the Avery Fisher hall was a disaster, and the playing of the NYP was sloppy. Carnegie Hall has it's drawbacks, but sound is not one of them. So a visiting orchestra playing there has an advantage.

      The Democrats create jobs. The Republicans create recessions.

      by Tuba Les on Mon Feb 18, 2013 at 01:30:44 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  oh, of course, absolutely (0+ / 0-)

        I'll admit, however, that when I recently saw the Budapest Festival Orchestra on tour there, they sounded pretty good in AFH, particularly upstairs in Rachmaninoff 2.  I think that Ivan Fischer has conducted there a number of times, both with the BFH and as a guest with the NY Phil, so he knows how to work the hall and get the best that he can out of it.

        Was Maazel conducting the NYP when you'd heard them a few years back?  I've only heard Maazel lead them once, and Gilbert with them not at all.  I've heard Gilbert as a guest conductor a few times way back here with the SLSO; OK, if not stupendous.

        "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

        by chingchongchinaman on Mon Feb 18, 2013 at 10:34:41 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  My Philadelphia O story (2+ / 0-)

    Is that I provided them with the supertitles for their recent performances of Das klagende Lied.

    Unfortunately, I couldn't attend to see them "live"—as I live six time zones away now. But it was very tempting.

    •  wait, how recent? (0+ / 0-)

      It wasn't the performance a few years back with Vladimir Jurowski, wasn't it?  This was the concert with the Alban Berg Three Pieces for Orchestra, op. 6, on the 1st half.  I was at one of those performances.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sun Feb 17, 2013 at 10:30:18 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  That's the one (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        chingchongchinaman

        It was the Philadelphia Orchestra's debut performance.

        •  have heard that WRTI may start to carry..... (0+ / 0-)

          ......a few Philadelphia Orchestra broadcasts, per this.  BTW, do you know about Peter Dobrin's artistic man-crush on Jurowski?  He's the conductor that Dobrin wanted as Philly's next music director, having prior run Eschenbach out of town.

          "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

          by chingchongchinaman on Mon Feb 18, 2013 at 10:45:43 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I don't really follow the Philadelphia O (0+ / 0-)

            I lived in Boston for many years, and have enough trouble following the rollercoaster that was Ozawa and Levine.

            But Jurowski does seem to be a relatively decent conductor. I haven't heard of him discussed in quite the same level as the Gergievs and Rattles of the conducting world, but I haven't heard people describing him as a hack, either.

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