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Salman Rushdie mourns the death of moral courage.
As recently as 1989, the image of a man carrying two shopping bags and defying the tanks of Tiananmen Square became, almost at once, a global symbol of courage.

Then, it seems, things changed. The “Tank Man” has been largely forgotten in China, while the pro-democracy protesters, including those who died in the massacre of June 3 and 4, have been successfully redescribed by the Chinese authorities as counterrevolutionaries. ...

Two years ago in Pakistan, the former governor of Punjab, Salman Taseer, defended a Christian woman, Asia Bibi, wrongly sentenced to death under the country’s draconian blasphemy law; for this he was murdered by one of his own security guards. The guard, Mumtaz Qadri, was widely praised and showered with rose petals when he appeared in court. ...

America isn’t immune from this trend. The young activists of the Occupy movement have been much maligned (though, after their highly effective relief work in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, those criticisms have become a little muted). Out-of-step intellectuals like Noam Chomsky and the deceased Edward Said have often been dismissed as crazy extremists, “anti-American,” and in Mr. Said’s case even, absurdly, as apologists for Palestinian “terrorism.” (One may disagree with Mr. Chomsky’s critiques of America but it ought still to be possible to recognize the courage it takes to stand up and bellow them into the face of American power. One may not be pro-Palestinian, but one should be able to see that Mr. Said stood up against Yasir Arafat as eloquently as he criticized the United States.)

Salman Rushdie talking about courage? It takes no courage at all to say this is your "read it all" choice of the morning.

Now come along, Pond, let's see what else people are saying this morning.

Bruce Holbert has personal experience with just how legally owned guns contribute to safety.

It was the second week in August, a Friday the 13th, in fact, in 1982. I was with a group of college roommates who were getting ready to go to the Omak Stampede and Suicide Race. Three of us piled into a red Vega parked outside a friend’s house in Okanogan, Wash., me in the back seat. The driver, who worked with the county sheriff’s department, offered me his service revolver to examine. I turned the weapon onto its side, pointed it toward the door. The barrel, however, slipped when I shifted my grip to pull the hammer back, to make certain the chamber was empty, and turned the gun toward the driver’s seat. When I let the hammer fall, the cylinder must have rotated without my knowing. When I pulled the hammer back a second time it fired a live round.

My friend, Doug, slumped in the driver’s seat, dying, and another friend, who was sitting in the passenger seat, raced into the house for the phone.

Sean Reardon looks at the best indicator of student performance: the color of their...money.  
Here’s a fact that may not surprise you: the children of the rich perform better in school, on average, than children from middle-class or poor families. Students growing up in richer families have better grades and higher standardized test scores, on average, than poorer students; they also have higher rates of participation in extracurricular activities and school leadership positions, higher graduation rates and higher rates of college enrollment and completion.

...

What is news is that in the United States over the last few decades these differences in educational success between high- and lower-income students have grown substantially.

Ruth Marcus rolls her eyes at the way congress is dealing with the sequester.
When the so-called sequester was triggered, the Obama administration was accused of exaggerating its impact. This week wasn’t sky-is-falling rhetoric, it was the-skies-aren’t-moving reality.

So it’s no wonder that Congress responded to the mess by, as The Post put it in a magnificently Latinate phrase, circumventing sequestration. When constituents howl, Washington listens — at least when the constituents are well-connected.

You might point out, and you’d be right, that lawmakers have not been nearly as responsive to other victims of the sequester’s mindlessness: kids who lost Head Start slots, criminal defendants whose public defenders have been furloughed, unemployed workers with benefits curtailed, Indian reservations unable to hire teachers.

Chris Paine looks for the truth behind the myths about electric cars.
4. Electric cars aren’t any better for the environment.

Electric cars have clear environmental benefits: They don’t require gasoline, they don’t pollute from tailpipes, and they operate at 80 percent efficiency (vs. about 20 percent for internal-combustion engines).

Skeptics will cite a 2012 report from the Union of Concerned Scientists as evidence that electric cars aren’t as green as some people make them out to be. That study correctly notes that autos powered by coal-generated electricity are little better for the environment than small gas-powered cars. But the same report concludes that “consumers should feel confident that driving an electric vehicle yields lower global warming emissions than the average new compact gasoline-powered vehicle.” That’s because only 39 percent of U.S. electricity comes from coal. With the retirement of old power plants and the addition of cleaner energy sources, electric cars will have even greater advantages for the environment.

Doyle McManus checks in on one of our less violent wars on inanimate things.
Here are three things the Obama administration has done that you probably didn't know about:

Ever struggle with those accordion-style rubber sleeves on nozzles at the gas station? The sleeve — technically a "vapor recovery nozzle" — was required by the Environmental Protection Agency to keep gasoline vapors from leaking into the air. But most cars and trucks now have technology that does the job better, so last year the EPA abolished the nozzle requirement. Because each sleeve-equipped nozzle can cost as much as $300, the change will save gas stations thousands of dollars.

Ever apply for financial aid for a child heading for college? Until 2010, the application form — the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA — was a parents' nightmare. (I write from personal experience here.) It required digging up information from multiple sources, and the complexity of the task discouraged thousands of families from applying for aid. So the Department of Education got to work and simplified the form. Some applicants can now complete much of it automatically, importing online data from their tax returns.

Tom Zoellner and Sam Kleiner explain the simple steps that would make it easier to track explosives.
The Tsarnaev brothers were identified because of surveillance videotape, but the FBI might have been able to do it faster if tiny plastic markers had been part of the small-arms propellant packed into the pressure-cooker bombs. These little chips, called "taggants," have been around for close to 40 years, and their crime-solving capability is impressive. But they're not used today because of one formidable opponent: the National Rifle Assn.

The idea behind taggants is both benign and ingenious, and it can be credited to a chemistry professor and former 3M employee named Richard Livesay, who had been angered over the 1970 leftist bombing at the University of Wisconsin that killed a graduate student. Explosions always create residue, and Livesay figured out that gunpowder could be seeded with bits of melamine plastic, which cannot be destroyed or melted. Each particle is about a tenth of a millimeter across and contains a layering of eight to 10 colors. They look like pepper flakes, and the specific color signature can be read with an infrared scanner, telling an investigator where that batch of explosive was produced and perhaps even the retail store where it was purchased.

This is one of those mornings where much of the regular crew is not exactly absent, but concerned with things that don't necessarily translate. So some new voices this morning.

Originally posted to Devil's Tower on Sat Apr 27, 2013 at 09:54 PM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  I read Bruce Holbert's (9+ / 0-)

    piece and still can't wrap my head around what happened.  It was a horrible, horrible accident -- but -- anyone who has been raised with guns or took even a stupid assed gun safety course knows not to put your finger on a trigger unless you are going to fire a round.  

    I guess I'm just not getting how he fired a round in that scenario.  

    Thanks for the round up.

    " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

    by gchaucer2 on Sat Apr 27, 2013 at 10:06:33 PM PDT

    •  From GunFAIL XV - #14 (9+ / 0-)

      GunFAIL XV

      WATKINSVILLE, GA, 4/19/13: Oconee County's (pop. 33,366) second negligent shooting in three days. A 25-year-old Watkinsville man shot himself in the hand when he tried to disassemble a pistol with a live round, deputies said. Both incidents were investigated by Oconee deputies, who determined no foul play was involved in either case, Sheriff Scott Berry said Monday. Both men simply were careless in their handling of loaded weapons, said Berry, who called the shootings “negligent discharges.” The Watkinsville man told deputies he had cleaned his Glock pistol, reassembled it, loaded a magazine, and chambered a live round, when his friend asked to look at the barrel. The man “placed his left hand over the end of the barrel of the hand gun, squeezed the trigger which is required for disassembly, and the live round went off,” according to a deputy’s report, striking the man in the left hand.
      That would be a massive design flaw if it was true that you had to pull the trigger to disassemble a Glock.  You would think that the deputy's report would mention that.
      •  while I am no gunsmith, most guns require (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        rja, Kimbeaux

        pulling the trigger at some point if you are disassembling the firing mechanism:
        http://www.youtube.com/...

        The simple explanation is the trigger assembly is released once the trigger is pulled, which either moves it into position for stripping or for firing the round

        •  Really? (0+ / 0-)

          The columnist was trying to check if the weapon was loaded when it went off. He was the one being smart and trying to be safe.

          It was the gun owner who intentionally put a loaded weapon, unsafetied, into untrained hands. The only idiot here was the YARGO.

          "What could BPossibly go wrong??" -RLMiller "God is just pretend." - eru

          by nosleep4u on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:12:02 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  see my other comment; he was not trying (5+ / 0-)

            to field strip the gun, which would require pulling the trigger.  He was seeing if it were loaded, which you do by flipping out the cylinder on a sidewheeler (several ways to do this depending on make)

            Matter of fact, flipping out the cylinder is the first step to examine any revolver, not pulling the trigger and snapping the hammer.  Only an idiot snaps the hammer and pulls the trigger on any weapon he does not intend to fire (dry snapping can also damage the weapon if done repeatedly)

            Also note some weapons have the hammer as their only safety which renders them even more dangerous IMHO.  Both parties were idiots

        •  You are right, have to pull the Glock trigger (0+ / 0-)

          Yuk!  The auto's that I have disassembled had the barrel off before you needed to touch a trigger.

          •  Ideally, you would have stripped off the (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            rja

            other components of an auto so pulling the trigger will have no effect.  In the normal sequence of field stripping an auto, it seems to me the only way you could have one to fire would be if you had a bullet trapped in the barrel (such as trying to chamber a smaller caliber round)  but if it is in the barrel and not the breech, it should not fire regardless unless your tool hits the primer since the firing pin should only contact rounds in the breech (neighbor had rounds fire once when bullets fell from top shelf and happened to hit some junk on the floor but that is very very rare)

    •  Carelessness. (7+ / 0-)

      Some years ago a neighbor's 15 year old son and grandfather were deer hunting when the boy climbed into a tree mounted deer stand. The grandfather handed up a  rifle, barrel first. The safety was off. A tree limb caught the trigger. The gun fired hitting the boy in the face. He died in his grandfather's arms. Two lives immediately destroyed in those fucking woods that cold November morning.

      Can I get a Grey Goose on the rocks over here?!

      by G Contractor on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:54:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I have represented three or four people who were (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Miggles, Chas 981, marykk, peggy, Buckeye54

        in this situation. In NC law enforcement will often charge the person who pulled the trigger with an unspecified homicide and let the legal system figure out if it's murder, manslaughter or a pure accident. It's so sad to see entire families torn apart by the guilt and sorrow that comes when on family member accidentally kills another. Or a best friend kills his or her best friend. In every case I've seen the person with the gun truly believed the gun was safe at the time. Gun accidents happen. And they happen to people experienced with guns. Just like car wrecks happen to people who are experienced and careful drivers. It's a silly deflection to pretend that guns would be otherwise safe if people were just trained in gun safety. Reasonable, trained, careful and smart people make mistakes. I don't believe we should take away people's guns. But we really do have to accept that they are inherently dangerous and treat them as such.

        "Speak the TRUTH, even if your voice shakes."

        by stellaluna on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:37:04 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Not "accidents" (12+ / 0-)

          These were perfectly foreseeable results of poor engineering or poor handling or ignorance or stupidity or some concatenation of factors.  The fact that they were unintended doesn't make them 'accidents.'  

          The design and operation of inherently dangerous instrumentalities such as motor vehicles and guns should be highly regulated to limit their huge potential for harm.  

          Oh, wait, the design and operation of MOTOR VEHICLES are regulated ......  

          •  Basic Gun Safety (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            TerryDarc, Mokurai

            As a youth at Boy Scout camp in the 1960's (rifle range using 22 caliber rifles),  the safety instruction was quite clear: that all guns are assumed to be loaded and no gun was ever to be pointed at another person. I remember a scout at the range being banished immediately, after mindlessly swinging one of the rifles and accidentally pointing it at others.

            For adults who ought to have had safety training, it seems it is a complete misuse of the word accidental to describe these events where they shoot themselves or someone else.

          •  2x poor handling + poor design (0+ / 0-)

            Anyone who has had basic instruction in gun safety knows that you demonstrate clearly that the gun is completely empty ("show clear") while making sure it is not pointed at anything that matters before you hand it to someone else. One reason I bought the gun I did was that it has three separate safeties, all of which must be disengaged, and one of which requires a positive hand squeeze on the grip at the time the trigger is pulled or it will not fire. It is pretty difgicult, though no doubt still possible, to accidentally fire this gun. I am not going to test it to see how. It can be locked open so that a) there is no way to fire it and b) it is immediately obvious that there is nothing chambered (or if there is a round chambered, see a), in which case I better damn well take the round and the (8-round, who needs more?) magazine out and show clear before handing it to another, all the time pointing it at something like the wall, outside of which there are acres of woods and no people. And I have the responsibility to make sure I know for a fact that the person to whom I'm handing my locked-open, shown-clear gun knows basic gun safety, the #1 rule of which is to always treat it as loaded no matter what (unless it has already been completely disassembled for cleaning - any partial assembly means treat it as loaded) and #2 is never point it at anything you aren't willing to shoot. (There are four rules and if you have your hand anywhere near my gun, it is my responsibility to watch you like a hawk to ensure you follow them all.)

            So there was clearly poor handling in the case of the gun owner, probably poor instruction, lack of taking responsibility, and lack of remaining watchful on the part of the gun owner, poor handling (quite possibly coupled with lack of knowledge) on the part of the columnist, and inexcusably poor design on the part of the gun manufacturer. It ought to be illegal to make guns with no safeties!

            I place responsibility here on all three, maybe least of which is the columnist if he truly didn't know what he was doing. But if he didn't know what he was doing, it was his responsibility not to take the gun as well as the gun owner's responsibility not to hand it to him in the first place, as well as the latter's failure to follow good gun safety practices.

            BTW, I never touched a gun until I first did so in a safety class. My husband isn't permitted to touch it, even though he knows the safety rules by heart, because he hasn't taken a safety class yet. I am a major stickler for the rules of gun safety and take my responsibility as a gun owner seriously. And I think that every would-be gun handler ought to take a safety class before ever touching one.

            Organ donors save lives! A donor's kidney gave me my life back on 02/18/11; he lives on in me. Please talk with your family about your wish to donate.

            Why are war casualty counts "American troops" and "others" but never "human beings"?

            by Kitsap River on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 12:28:05 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  A gun is not like a car. A gun is like a video (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Miggles

          game. Belly up to the bar. Buy your gun.

          No requirement to be able to use your gun, like a video game. No requirement to keep your gun, like a video. Lose your gun, run to the store and get another. Forever and ever.

          Misfire your gun. First million times go to the store and get more ammo. That one time when the bullet goes through a wall and hits a little girl in the face, tragic but Gun Accidents Happen.

          A gun is like a video game.

          guns are fun v. hey buddy, watch what you are doing -- which side are you on?

          by 88kathy on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 08:38:40 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Safety catch was not on. It should have been. (3+ / 0-)

        You have exactly 10 seconds to change that look of disgusting pity into one of enormous respect!

        by Cartoon Peril on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:37:16 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  it appears it was a Saturday night special (0+ / 0-)

      without a separate safety so the hammer was the safety while it also appears he had the trigger depressed so he was "snapping" the hammer so it would fire when the hammer dropped.  Some folks used to wire back triggers so they could fire with only a hammer drop.

      Guns 100: never hand your weapon to an idiot

    •  Any way you look at it, it was not an "accident" (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gffish, Miggles, Kitsap River, OldDragon

      The gun didn't point itself at his friend and the gun didn't pull the trigger.  

      It's been 31 years and he's still using the passive voice to describe this, as if the gun itself were animate.

      You have exactly 10 seconds to change that look of disgusting pity into one of enormous respect!

      by Cartoon Peril on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:32:57 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  As a teen I went out shooting a 22 with a date... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      marykk, OldDragon

      Seemed like a good idea at the time.  She had shot a rifle before, but apparent not a pump action one.  When it was her turn to shoot she pulled back on the pump to put a new round into the chamber.  And shot a slug into the dirt about a foot from one of my feet.  We laughed and didn't think much about it.  Being young and on a date can cause a form of euphoria.

      But I came very, very close to getting shot in the foot or leg in that incident.  Lots of things in life can be dangerous, firearms among them.

      Oh, did I say?  Wayne La Pierre has a 727 at his disposal, to jet around the country and rave at various audiences?

      Guns kill, but they can also enrich.  Wayne's jet uses dead Americans as its fuel.

  •  Moral courage is often not popular (19+ / 0-)

    Because it places a choice on the observer: stand up to power like the person making the example, or continue to give in to power knowing you're motivated by fear.

    People do not appreciate being presented with that choice, or that knowledge about themselves, one reason why heroes are often heroes only after their own times.

    The Tank Man, by the way, was as much an example of physical as moral courage, and a great hero either way.

    Cutting Social Security will end my support for the Democratic Party.

    by MrJayTee on Sat Apr 27, 2013 at 10:35:35 PM PDT

  •  The NRA is in some respects, a subversive (28+ / 0-)

    organization.

     

    These little chips, called "taggants," have been around for close to 40 years, and their crime-solving capability is impressive. But they're not used today because of one formidable opponent: the National Rifle Assn.
    Why should the NRA have the ability to obstruct the tracing of explosives?

    Time is a long river.

    by phonegery on Sat Apr 27, 2013 at 11:09:25 PM PDT

  •  Paine and Electric Cars (7+ / 0-)

    Paine is correct that electric cars are better for the environment.  However, range anxiety and cost are two real issues that need to be addressed before people start to begin purchasing electrics in larger numbers.

    The US automotive and power industries have been slow to work on a nationwide charging system which would allow drivers of EV's to take longer trips.  

    And with increases in gas and diesel engine technology, MPG's are higher and customers don't see the trade-off of buying an EV with limited range and a gas vehicle that gets 40 mpg, is cheaper and there is no range anxiety.  That customer believes they are helping the environment.

    •  on the other hand, I'm willing to bet (5+ / 0-)

      those who buy an electrical car, have a much higher rate of acceptance of solar panels on their homes, so they have an even lower carbon footprint then the study suggests.

    •  Although a nationwide charging system (5+ / 0-)

      has not been put in place - and who would be responsible for accomplishing that? - there are more stations available nationwide than most people realize.

      For a map of available charging stations across the country, check this website.  It would be difficult to find stations to enable a drive cross-country, but making it from one metropolitan area to another, particularly in the eastern U.S. and along the west coast shouldn't be all that problematic with a little advance planning.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:32:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The Chargepoint network is relatively (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skohayes, rl en france, SueDe, Tool

        comprehensive, and at least for the moment users can charge for free at most of their stations.

        http://www.chargepoint.com

        When the union's inspiration /Through the workers' blood shall run /There can be no power greater /Anywhere beneath the sun /Solidarity Forever!

        by litho on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:48:39 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  To make a dent you're going to need thousands, (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SueDe, wintergreen8694, Kimbeaux

          ultimately millions of points.
          What will help push electric is to push gas mileages standards up to push hybrids, and to push solar electricity to drop the cost of electricity.

          Then there's the problem of finding enough lithium and rare earth metals, etc. and there will also have to be a robust, regulated recycling program for all electronics and electrical parts.

          So we're going to have to evolve and push forward and depend on perseverance and persistence over time to make this happen. It's not going to be one of those "blink twice" deals.

          Also, we're going to need more mass transit, more bike-sharing, (and car-sharing) and we're going to have to redesign our communities and highways to help reduce waste.
          All of this will take time for American consumers to accept and appreciate.
          My comment is just an admonition for people to not just be patient but persistent. It's going to be a long haul.

          You can't make this stuff up.

          by David54 on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:51:07 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  My understanding is that lithium (0+ / 0-)

            is fairly plentiful.  There's deserts full of it in Bolivia.

            When the union's inspiration /Through the workers' blood shall run /There can be no power greater /Anywhere beneath the sun /Solidarity Forever!

            by litho on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:30:01 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  They are starting to strip lithium from geothermal (0+ / 0-)

              water at the Salton Sea.

              These capitalists generally act harmoniously and in concert to fleece the people, and now that they have got into a quarrel with themselves, we are called upon to appropriate the people's money to settle the quarrel. Abraham Lincoln

              by Nailbanger on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 09:26:11 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  That means it's owned by the Bolivians. (0+ / 0-)

              Which of course is a good thing for Bolivians.

              The questions raised in the article are part of what I'm suggesting in my comment. It's not something you can just pick up off the ground and make a battery with.

              China has the world market on rare earth metals cornered.
              I've heard they also have designs on lithium, with deposits located in eastern Tibet.

              I've also seen some discussion of Afghanistan and Central Asia as a source. I'm not sure about that.

              At any rate, there is a "global market" with all the potential problems that entails. I'm not poo-pooing electric cars or batteries, I'm saying that production on a massive scale is not going to happen overnight. When it does, it will need civilized regulation and recycling, or we will have CIA coup plots, land grabs, civil wars, more environmental devastation, speculator booms and busts, etc. all of which could slow or derail electric transportation.

              You can't make this stuff up.

              by David54 on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 02:25:08 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  There is good information out there (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          wintergreen8694, litho, shaharazade

          if people have an interest in finding it.  It's people who do not have an electric vehicle nor any interest in owning one who continually use lack of charging stations as an excuse for the unworkability of such vehicles.

          "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

          by SueDe on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:52:54 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  The range on my Volt is 50 miles (17+ / 0-)

      but careful planning yesterday allowed me to go nearly ninety gas free miles, simply by using publicly available charging stations near my destinations. In fact, the charging station gave me a competitive advantage in finding a parking spot when I went last night's Red Sox game. Everyone else was driving around the garage fighting over the few remaining spots, but I just pulled into one of the eight reserved charging stations (all of which were empty) plugged in, and walked away. Four hours later, came and got in my fully charged car and drove home. Didn't use an ounce of gas.

      When the union's inspiration /Through the workers' blood shall run /There can be no power greater /Anywhere beneath the sun /Solidarity Forever!

      by litho on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:45:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Comparing Chomsky and OWS to people... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    duhban, hmi

    ...risking their lives (and losing their lives) for free speech doesn't add up to me.

    Sorry.

    "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

    by Bush Bites on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 04:00:39 AM PDT

    •  well it is Rushdie who also considers himself to (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Debby, gffish

      be a hero for living under the threat of a fatwa for decades.  However the amount of real danger he faced is questionable as the Iranians are not noted for their foreign death squads.  He could have placed in danger by a single religious fanatic acting on his own had Rushdie remained public but I am not sure how much actual danger he faced vs the danger ordinary people face in their everyday lives

      •  Would you and Bush (5+ / 0-)

        care to tell us (inquiring minds and all that) just exactly what you DO consider is courage?

        American Television is a vast sea of stupid. -xxdr zombiexx

        by glitterscale on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:13:51 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  "real danger he faced is questionable" Really? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        peggy, vcmvo2

        The fatwa was officially supported by the Iranian government.
        A reward of $1 million was offered by the Iranian Khordad Foundation.
        A Iranian businessman offered a $3 million bounty.
        Bookstores were firebombed for selling the novel.
        Riverdale Press was firebombed for an editorial defending the novel.
        A man blew himself up along with 2 floors of a London hotel while preparing a bomb intended for Rushdie.
        Hitoshi Igarashi, the Japanese translator of the Satanic Verses was stabbed to death.
        Ettore Capriolo, the Italian translator was seriously wounded in an attack.
        William Nygaard, the Norwegian publisher of the novel was shot and seriously injured.

        All this and much more in response to words on paper.

        •  still was the level of danger such that he was (0+ / 0-)

          heroic in sequestering himself or would it have been more heroic to speak out publicly and show that terror is ineffective.  I take it the ones you list did not choose to go into hiding but decided to confront evil head on.  If you remember the example was the guy in front of the tank in Tienanmen Square.  Does Rushdie rank along with this guy?

          •  I'm not interested in comparing and ranking levels (0+ / 0-)

            of heroism.  I see nothing in Rushdie’s editorial attempting to equal what he did and went through with what the young man in Tiananmen Square did and went through.

            I am interested in disabusing people of the notion that what Rushdie went through wasn't deadly serious or that he was somehow undeserving of support he received.

          •  Heroic (0+ / 0-)

            Where did Rushdie compare himself to the tank guy? Why are you (in several comments above this one) attempting to minimize or deflect from Professor Rushdie's point?

    •  Scott Olsen, Iraqi veteran (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Laconic Lib, Tool, Nailbanger, OldDragon, peggy

      was one of many Occupy protestors and others photographing and filming the protestors who put their safety at risk. They engaged in peaceful protest in front of armed violent law enforcement officers.

      Link

      Olsen was shot in the head with a tear gas canister or rubber bullet aimed at him by a policeman. He sustained a fractured skull and brain damage.

      When protestors came to Olsen's rescue, another policeman lobbed a flash-bang tear gas grenade at them.

      Link to video of Olsen being shot

      Cameraman shot

      "If you can't take their money, eat their food, drink their booze and then vote against them, you have no business being up there."

      by Betty Pinson on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 08:10:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Just some Good Ole Boys going to enjoy.... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    gffish

    ....some animal abuse -- then it all went wrong.

     

    In the previous 25 years, for example, at least 21 horses have died, including three in 2004[1][6] and one in 2012.[7]
    Jerk stores.

    "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

    by Bush Bites on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 04:04:17 AM PDT

  •  Yeah, the electric car objections sounded.... (6+ / 0-)

    .....like the scientists were just trying to find something to object to.

    Of course it depends how the energy is generated but at least the technology provides the option of green operation whereas internal combustion engines never will.

    And, you know, how much did the scientists look at the exploration and discovery and drilling and refining and transport operations of gas producers anyway? Or the wars required to maintain access to oil, for that matter?

    "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

    by Bush Bites on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 04:12:34 AM PDT

    •  I think much or our alternative energies (3+ / 0-)

      will be decentralized and if we're on a grid our electricty will be coming from a ariety of sources.

      IF one had a sufficent solar or solar/wind setup at one's home (I live in a nether-region between a city and full-on country) all the charging one did at home would be 'clean' wouldn't it?

      I had to buy a new car (replace 18 yo truck) and there still aren't what I consider desirable electrics yet.

      A tesla engine in the thing I got would be friggin awesome, though.... 300kW electric engine w/AWD.... that's what I want

      •  There's a local myth... (0+ / 0-)

        ...here in Ann Arbor that a couple of Grad Students pitched a Hybrid version of the Hummer to GM just after 9/11. They used existing tech: golf cart batteries, but suggested that many owners would pay a significant "Freedom Premium" to get better mileage from a hybrid Hummer. The figured their setup would result in an average 18 mpg, but figured that better battery technology would be coming to make that figure even better, so the story goes.

        When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

        by Egalitare on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:04:51 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I remember when taggants were going to happen... (5+ / 0-)

    ...in the 90s, then something happened to stop it.

    Guess that was the NRA.

    "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

    by Bush Bites on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 04:15:42 AM PDT

    •  More: An article from 1996. (9+ / 0-)

      Law enforcement officials have tried for nearly two decades to persuade Congress to pass a taggant law. President Clinton has consistently supported the idea. The NRA and its allies, however, have resisted putting taggants in gunpowder and has resisted even allowing the federal government to study their use. The NRA claims that taggants will raise the cost and lower the quality of gunpowder, and that federal law enforcement agencies are too untrustworthy to conduct an impartial taggant study.

      http://articles.latimes.com/...

      "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

      by Bush Bites on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 04:23:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  from memory it seems that tagging was (0+ / 0-)

      instituted in some HE during the Clinton years but was soon abandoned by the manufacturers

    •  Taggants would not have helped in the Boston (0+ / 0-)

      Marathon investigation, I believe.

      The gunpowder in the bombs was obtained by buying fireworks, then removing the powder from them; it's one of the techniques included in the Al Qaida handbook for making bombs.

      Fireworks are generally imported, the bulk of them coming from China, Vietnam, and other Asian sources.

      I suppose we could require that all imported fireworks contain taggants but I'm not sure how practical or enforceable that would be.

      I'm not opposed to requiring taggants, in fact I'm in favor of it. But it doesn't appear to be the sole solution to the problem of homemade bombs.

      When atlatls are outlawed, only outlaws will have atlatls.

      by wheeldog on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 08:32:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  There is a remarkable op ed in the Washington Post (7+ / 0-)

    titled I could justify fighting in Afghanistan — until the Boston bombing It is written by a Marine who served two tours in Afghanistan and is from Boston.  I explore his words and add a few observations of my own in this diary to which I invite your attention.

    Even if you do not want to read what I wrote, do yourself a favor and go read the original.

    Peace.

    "We didn't set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people's hearts." - Pema Chodron

    by teacherken on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 04:32:21 AM PDT

    •  The circle that truly never goes unbroken (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      One Opinion

      is the cycle of violence. And we continue fueling that circle over and over and over again because we NEVER think about the consequences. Hell, nobody gives a damn about the consequences.

      Until they strike home.

      American Television is a vast sea of stupid. -xxdr zombiexx

      by glitterscale on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:21:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I strongly urge people to read the Holbert piece (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TerryDarc

    it is powerful

    it needs no commentary from others

    Here is the link so you do not have to go back up to where Mark provided it.

    "We didn't set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people's hearts." - Pema Chodron

    by teacherken on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 04:36:32 AM PDT

  •  i lease a volt and i love it (12+ / 0-)

    i spend more money on beer than i do on gasoline

    •  my only gripe is that i prefer driving a stick (4+ / 0-)

      manual transmissions are just better

    •   As do I... (8+ / 0-)

      I had to make some long trips that knocked my mileage all the way down to 80, but I'm working my way back up now that I've found a stray outlet to plug into at work. I've very much enjoyed the car.

    •  is the Volt better than the Leaf? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      aaraujo, TerryDarc

      "Tax cuts for the 1% create jobs." -- Republicans, HAHAHA - in China

      by MartyM on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:45:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  without a doubt (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        litho, MartyM, TerryDarc

        no anxiety

      •  I drive over 100 miles a day (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MartyM, TerryDarc

        and the Leaf simply wouldn't be able to do that. Especially not in the winter, when the range drops as much as fifty percent.

        When the union's inspiration /Through the workers' blood shall run /There can be no power greater /Anywhere beneath the sun /Solidarity Forever!

        by litho on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:54:28 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Why would the temperature (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MartyM

          make a difference in the capacity of the battery?  And does running the heater or air conditioner make a difference in the mileage as well?

          "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

          by SueDe on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:28:11 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I don't know the physics of it (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            SueDe, MartyM

            but I do know from experience it's true.  In the cold weather, the range dropped to thirty miles or so on a full charge, and now that it's warm I've had days where I've got it all the way up to sixty.  Fifty is about average for warm weather, forty for cold.

            I avoid using the heater and air conditioner, though I will when I have to.  The heater, frankly, sucks.  It takes a long time to heat up, and I'm usually at or near my destination when it gets warm.  And it is a major drain on the battery.

            When the union's inspiration /Through the workers' blood shall run /There can be no power greater /Anywhere beneath the sun /Solidarity Forever!

            by litho on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:36:26 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  That could be a real problem in a state (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              MartyM

              like Texas, where people in the southern part of the state hardly ever use the heater but for whom air conditioning is a necessity, and people in the northern part of the state who must use both extensively.  Combine that with the distances to be covered in driving from one metropolitan area to another, and it's questionable how practical people will find these vehicles until major accommodations are made for their use.

              "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

              by SueDe on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:00:08 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Here in MA you do need both (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                SueDe, aaraujo

                I can get by ok opening the windows in warm weather, but it is tough in the cold.  I wear scarves, long underwear sometimes, and when the temperature is below zero I bite the bullet and turn on the heat.

                Still, my lifetime mpg right now is 155, and it should  be over 170 by the end of the summer.  The lowest it went in the cold weather was 142.

                When the union's inspiration /Through the workers' blood shall run /There can be no power greater /Anywhere beneath the sun /Solidarity Forever!

                by litho on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:33:43 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  It won't work for everyone (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          aaraujo

          My commute is 8 miles, 20 if I include the school and play date chauffeuring I do in my capacity of "Mr. Mom." My wife has your commute (though she is mildly considering a Tesla as a next vehicle), but if/when I replace my vehicle with an EV, it won't be soon enough for me.

          I suspect that an EV would "work" for no less than 10% of people who have only one vehicle and well more than half of us who have more than one vehicle in the household.

          When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

          by Egalitare on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:37:33 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I would go for the Tesla in a second (0+ / 0-)

            knowing what I know now.  At the time I was scared by the price, but it's only about 10,000 more than the Volt and the range is supposed to be four times as much.

            The savings in gas make the difference in price affordable.

            When the union's inspiration /Through the workers' blood shall run /There can be no power greater /Anywhere beneath the sun /Solidarity Forever!

            by litho on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:26:09 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  That's the way its supposed to be, right? (4+ / 0-)
      i spend more money on beer than i do on gasoline

      Can I get a Grey Goose on the rocks over here?!

      by G Contractor on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:02:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  money and education (4+ / 0-)

    Rich kids get better (as in more expensive) schools, better pre and post natal care, better tutoring, less chaotic childhoods--better educational tools (toys)-- and better educated parents.  Economic inequality will destroy America because the numbers of rich kids are decreasing.  The answer to this problem is the elimination of private schools and of home schooling.  When all kids go to integrated inclusive schools--the education of all children becomes better funded.  That's a start.  Of course, less inequality would help.

    Apres Bush, le deluge.

    by melvynny on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 04:43:54 AM PDT

    •  We are certainly far from rich, but (9+ / 0-)

      We sent our son to a small independent school starting in the middle of 7th grade, moving out of a highly-regarded district, and it changed his life.  Before that, kids used to wait in front of our elementary school to smash his head against the wall as he arrived each morning.  They threw his house keys out the bus window.  One teacher refused for a month to return a paper that he had written and illustrated (I think she lost it) that he had stayed up for a week creating.  When he asked her why she didn't return it, she said, " because I don't LIKE you."  He struggled with the work because of some quirky disabilities, but no one cared a whit.  He was lonely and depressed, and was starting to walk in front of cars to get out of going to school.  Independent school was a different matter.  He visited one day, to see what it was like, and when I got him at the end of the day, his comment was, "life CAN be beautiful."  We begged and borrowed, and sent him there.  He flourished among a range of kids; some misfits, some mildly disabled, some really comfortable financially.

      Ours is a highly-funded, top-of-the-pile district, but some kids don't belong in large public schools.  Eliminating them all because some rich kids get a leg up in private school isn't a good idea.

      "Why reasonable people go stark raving mad when anything involving a Negro comes up, is something I don’t pretend to understand." ~ Atticus Finch, "To Kill a Mockingbird"

      by SottoVoce on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:17:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  exception (5+ / 0-)

        No system is without exceptions--a properly run school, with good leadership, would never had allowed this to happen.  You--he--luckily found a private school replacement--it should have been available publicly.  There is no reason for a private school to be better than a public one that is properly funded.  As a retired teacher, I find it hard to understand the public school's inaction-- is this a case of bigotry?  No system is better than the people within.

        Apres Bush, le deluge.

        by melvynny on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:26:39 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Most schools (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          wintergreen8694, Kimbeaux, Nannyberry

          are too big to be in your ideal. I too attended a a top rated public school, one that spends the most per child in the state.  It is huge and when I was there in the late sixties it was huge. The experiences I had were why I sent my kids to a small, private religious school.  Until schools get control of the mini society the kids create and run in schools they will not become ideal educating places.  Another solution is to create smaller, more intimate schools that would allow for more intervention in bulllying and cruelty situations.

          Everyone! Arms akimbo!

          by tobendaro on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:08:02 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  size (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Mark Sumner, Egalitare, Stude Dude

            My high school--Lincoln--in Brooklyn--had over 5000 students--and was great.  Even in the late '50s, I was able to take college level science courses-- not available in smaller schools.  This trend towards smaller schools is mostly wrong-- size allows for much more individuality--counter intuitive.   Think of it this way--when you're sick, do you have better facilities in a large teaching hospital--or the small community one.  To my mind, you'll more likely get more smiles in the latter, better medicine in the former.

            Apres Bush, le deluge.

            by melvynny on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:17:27 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  It's true that there are far more (3+ / 0-)

              facilities and choices in a large school; after all, we moved to the district we did with that in mind.  At the same time, some students (those with ADHD for one example--which, despite the over-diagnosis of this disorder is REAL) do better in a smaller setting.  The regimentation required just to get a horde of students through the day is an anathema to some students.  This  may be personal, but the straw that broke the camel's back for my son was the insistence--no exceptions--that he carry an individual 3-ring binder for each subject.  This was literally impossible for him to comply with.  He became so confused, so twisted up trying to organize and find his materials with his disability, that he would scream and cry and tear papers and run outside in distress.  Forget learning (which he was good at); his life was a nightmare of losing homework and notes and always having the wrong binder and getting punished or humiliated for it.  So he'd carry all five, all day, but he'd drop a few, all the papers would scatter,and he'd take days to sort it out. For most kids, this would be a simple matter; for him, it was like a mountain he couldn't climb.  (Forget the people who couldn't afford five binders.  Who would even think of them?).  In such a large school, making no exceptions for rules, even arbitrary ones, makes it possible for them to"process" hundreds or thousands of students.  But for those who can't function under one rule or another, daily life is hard to live.  All the clubs and sports equipment and musical instruments in the world don't make up for simple peace and the ability to get through the day.

              "Why reasonable people go stark raving mad when anything involving a Negro comes up, is something I don’t pretend to understand." ~ Atticus Finch, "To Kill a Mockingbird"

              by SottoVoce on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:49:24 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  incompetence (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                SottoVoce, One Opinion

                What you describe is a poorly run school--the same principal would also be a problem in a small school.  Put another way, size didn't hamper your son's education, idiots did.

                BTW, you might be interested in this NYTimes article-

                sleep disorder

                Apres Bush, le deluge.

                by melvynny on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:01:13 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  saw the article this morning, and read it--thanks. (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  tobendaro, TerryDarc, Stude Dude

                  Sadly, this "poorly run" school always makes it to the top of the charts.  This is in some part because of the well-heeled, well-educated population of the district.  It's got beautiful buildings, enrichment galore, and kids who are middle-of-the-road, or seriously disabled, or bound-to-succeed do very well there.  But it's just no place for odd ducks.  This was in the 80s, mind you.  Whole Language was the educational philosophy of the moment (the way core standards and testing is the rage now).   But the teachers weren't fully trained in the principles of Whole Language, the way they aren't yet up to speed on core standards now.  They just got rid of the phonetic approach and penmanship practice and structured reading, and replaced it with who knows what.  Those who were slow to learn to read and write just sank to the bottom, and never recovered their self esteem or academic standing.

                  BTW, thanks for engaging with me.  I'm from NYS also, though not the city.  I've also spent my life in and around education, in my case teaching theater, but I haven't dredged up these awful memories for a long while.

                  "Why reasonable people go stark raving mad when anything involving a Negro comes up, is something I don’t pretend to understand." ~ Atticus Finch, "To Kill a Mockingbird"

                  by SottoVoce on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:16:47 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

        •  Not bigotry, no. (5+ / 0-)

          He did have a couple of really good teachers over the years.  But he was a quirky kid, not popular despite being handsome and funny, had certain knotty academic difficulties despite being bright, he required individual attention, and they preferred the success-only model.  He was used to bullying, and actually put a stop to the head-bashing himself when he made a personal appointment with the principal to discuss it.  It ceased immediately after that.  It might just have been the luck of the draw: he got assigned a number of old-fashioned, close-to-retirement, rigid teachers early on, who didn't 't get him.  He may have started out better with different ones.

          Ironically, a large proportion of the student body was from households far more financially successful than we were.  The school district had every benefit, and regularly lands near the top of statewide lists. They offer every enrichment known to man, except an interest in dealing on an individual basis with students who didn't fit the mold.  Also, as a consequence of his ADHD, he functioned better in a much smaller classroom, something they couldn't provide.

          After years of trudging into the various offices  to advocate for him, we just got tired of his unhappiness.  When we pulled him out, I asked the middle school principle if he wanted to know why.  His reply: " No.  One less student to deal with."

          "Why reasonable people go stark raving mad when anything involving a Negro comes up, is something I don’t pretend to understand." ~ Atticus Finch, "To Kill a Mockingbird"

          by SottoVoce on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:12:05 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Unconscionable, clearly... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Stude Dude

          ...kids can be cruel. I remember long ago doing similar stuff to a kid at school. But the unconscionable thing is not the kids behavior, but the teachers and staff's inaction. And our. I am still deeply ashamed of what I did as an 11 year old and no teacher stepped in to prevent the bullying.

          My apologies that your son was so poorly treated.

          What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. King Henry, scene ii

          by TerryDarc on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 03:41:28 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Hmmmm.... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SottoVoce, TerryDarc, Buckeye54

        Sounds like my school life....
        Not going into details, it was almost 60 years ago, I had a 2nd grade teacher who was, at best, a humiliator, but in truth and in retrospect was a verbal and emotional abuser.  I had been a happy go-lucky kid, and my parents knew something was up that year when I became quiet and weepy.  Initially, they thought it was just a phase I was going through (they were from the old school belief that 'teacher knows best'), but clearly something was definitely not right.
        Finally, it was brought to the attention of the Principal who was a very kind and capable woman.  Thank you, Mrs Livingston.  I did get out of that horrible situation (even though I had to finish out the year with that dreadful teacher).  
        My 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th grade teachers were wonderfully sweet, kind women, who cared about children and taught us well.  
        Still, that year-long hellish experience ruined school for me.  I loved learning, but not in the rigid atmosphere of a classroom where one could be ridiculed by a trusted teacher who made one child a daily butt of venomous sarcasm.
        This episode fired up my parents.  Education was very important to them, it pained them that it was so distorted by the very people who were entrusted to teach their children.  My dad ran for (and won) a school board seat.  They were determined this sh*t shouldn't happen again to another kid in the school.  But there was only so much they could do within the school system.
        My parents scraped and saved and got us an encyclopedia, which I read from cover to cover.  Then they scraped and saved to send my brother and me away to a secondary school, because there was no high school in our town.  
        Their help was my salvation.
        They have my everlasting thanks.

        I think, therefore I am........................... Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose....AKA Engine Nighthawk - don't even ask!

        by Lilyvt on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:46:44 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  grim story. Amazingly true, though, how (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Lilyvt, TerryDarc, Stude Dude

          a mean, uncaring, rigid or misguided teacher can have such an outsized impact on a child, and loom so large over their whole life in those years.

          When our son was struggling mightily in 1st grade, and could not really read or really write yet, his teacher assigned a project on moths.  They were supposed to do kind of illustrated chart, answering a series of questions about the moth.  She assigned the individual moths to each student.  He got one that was so rare it couldn't be found in the library.  We started with the children's encyclopedias, moth books, general insect books, books about nature.  Then we went to the adult section, including even the Field Guide to North America.  No dice.  No answers.  By the time we landed at the desk of the reference librarian, he was dissolved in tears.  "I'm too stupid to do this project," he said.  The reference librarian was able to help find a few answers, but not all.

          The next day I called the teacher.  I asked he why, knowing his struggles in school, she couldn't have chosen an easier-to-find moth for him.  He was, after all, only 6.  "Not being able to find all the answers is an aspect of research," she sniffed.  And in the end she gave him a poor grade anyway.

          Those mean women haunt my dreams.  I can imagine his, too.

          "Why reasonable people go stark raving mad when anything involving a Negro comes up, is something I don’t pretend to understand." ~ Atticus Finch, "To Kill a Mockingbird"

          by SottoVoce on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 09:31:25 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Yup.... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Stude Dude
            Those mean women haunt my dreams.  I can imagine his, too.
            And mine.  (Even after all these years later)

            I think, therefore I am........................... Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose....AKA Engine Nighthawk - don't even ask!

            by Lilyvt on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 09:55:20 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  Most of the segregation in public schools (5+ / 0-)

      is the result of segregation by neighborhood.  Schools tend to be neighborhood schools, and neighborhoods are most generally made up of students who share economic status, access to resources and other class structures.

      A student tends to go to a school whose funding mostly reflects the economic face of the area in which the school is located.  The state has the responsibility for equalizing school funding by appropriating state and federal money for this purpose, but that doesn't happen even after rulings by the SCOTUS holding that states' allowing unequal funding is unconstitutional.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:45:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  marked to read later (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raines

    and was that a doctor who joke?

    In the time that I have been given,
    I am what I am

    by duhban on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 04:46:54 AM PDT

    •  Yes (7+ / 0-)

      Yes it was. It's what comes of writing these things on Saturday night.

      •  good man I raise my glass to you (0+ / 0-)

        sadly I haven't seen the most recent one yet (I hate working Saturdays) but I plan to rectify that with a good eis bier tonight

        In the time that I have been given,
        I am what I am

        by duhban on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:11:27 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Repubs leave Obama holding the bag - again (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skillet, skohayes
        4/27/13....With another fight over the national debt brewing this summer, congressional Republicans are de-emphasizing their demand for politically painful cuts to retirement programs and focusing on a more popular prize: a thorough rewrite of the U.S. tax code.
        http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

        "Tax cuts for the 1% create jobs." -- Republicans, HAHAHA - in China

        by MartyM on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:46:58 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  'The conference will unite around tax reform'... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          skohayes, MartyM

          but with no specifics I betcha.

          •  These guys are effing pitiful (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            skillet, One Opinion, Laconic Lib
            The House strategy also holds some appeal in the Senate, where key Republicans say it may offer a more palatable alternative to negotiating a budget deal directly with Obama. After two dinners with the president and a meeting Thursday with senior administration officials, Senate Republicans are under pressure from the White House to produce their own debt-reduction plan to counter Obama’s proposal to reduce borrowing by $1.8 trillion over the next decade through higher taxes as well as cuts to retirement programs....
            However, the senior Republican on the panel, Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (Utah), said after Thursday’s meeting with White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough that he is not inclined to take the lead in drafting a GOP counteroffer. Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) said the senators are also worried about agreeing to anything that would undercut House leaders.

            “We really can’t go first,” Hatch said. “If I were the White House, I’d be working very hard with a guy like Camp, who’s a reasonable guy and smart to boot. And highly thought-of by both sides.”

            Not only is Camp reasonable, but he's smart, too! High praise for a House Republican!

            “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

            by skohayes on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:35:38 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks for the Roundup, Mark. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    hulibow, DrLori, rl en france, skohayes

    Second only to coffee to start my day.

    "Why reasonable people go stark raving mad when anything involving a Negro comes up, is something I don’t pretend to understand." ~ Atticus Finch, "To Kill a Mockingbird"

    by SottoVoce on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 04:55:22 AM PDT

  •  Re:Rushdie - America isn't immune to this trend? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tobendaro

    America is absolutely swimming in this trend, and nowhere is it more obvious than DK.

    Conservatives aren't conservatives. They are homophobes, racists and nincompoops.

    Progressives may make mistakes (let's see -- oh! when they're not progressive enough), but the "other guys" are barely even human beings.

    Ordinary Americans who don't get with the program are stupid or deniers.  

    When Occupy Wall Street was doing its thing, the ordinary DKer, I think, would have rather drunk hemlock than admit to the obvious: Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party movement (at the rubber meets the road level, at least) were very much the same thing expressing many of the same frustrations from different points of view.

    I'm sure the same thing happens on Red State.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 04:58:19 AM PDT

    •  Barely even human beings? n/t (0+ / 0-)
    •  rofl.. (14+ / 0-)

      Yes..Very much the same thing..Occupy and the Tea Party..Exactly the same..

      One had the bank roll of right wing billionaires, think tanks, never create any direct action, were the darling fawns of the media, and were the very definition of an astro turf movement..

      Occupy? A bunch of poor people in a park systematically treated as a terrorist organization by the DHS, Federal Government and democratic politicians while getting negative media coverage...

      Right..the false equivalency is strong with this one..

      President Obama would have been a republican in the 1980's & 1990's. Go figure.

      by Tool on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:10:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Wow -- you really did drink the Kool-Aid didn't (0+ / 1-)
        Recommended by:
        Hidden by:
        Kimbeaux

        you?

        You wear your handle well.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:15:48 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  What is (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Tool, Miggles

          drinking the kool aid about Tool's statement?

          It is you who is drinking the kool aid as shown by your earlier statemet lumping OWS supporters and tea party supporters in together.

          •  The whole statement -- right on down to the (0+ / 0-)

            Billionaire astro-turfing.

            And dishonest Kool-Aid it is from a Kossack.

            This is a site that reveled in showing signs of oddly-dressed people with mis-spelled signs and, in some cases, racist or otherwise unsavory messages.

            Those folks weren't billionaires.
            Those folks put the lie to the astro-turf allegations.

            Some big rollers may have started the ball rolling, but billionaires amount to about 400 votes.

            What made the Tea Party like OWS were all the people who showed up and all the people who voted.  In the end, the billionaires shot themselves in the feet and Republicans lost some winnable Senate races because the Tea Party became something they couldn't control.

            My heart weeps.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 08:11:07 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  HR'd for personal attack. n/t (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Tool, One Opinion, Miggles

          Socialist? I do not think that word means what you think it means.

          by Kimbeaux on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:49:36 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  There is only (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          middleagedhousewife, Kimbeaux

          one way in which OWS and the Tea party come together and that is that they share the fact that people are passionate about politics and the ramifications it has on their lives.

          Beyond that there is far too much difference in terms of age demographics, socioeconomic status, views on authoritarian government, fiscal policies, human rights, civil rights, domestic spying, healthcare, and nearly everything that embodies a view of a progressive world is far to big to overcome.

          The Tea Party is not that movement and to equate them together as having ultimately the same goals is a flawed assertion.

          It is well documented that the systematic federal evictions of the Occupy camps, two such evictions I was at personally, was coordinated by the DHS, FBI, NYPD, and all other police localities on about 16, or 17 of the major occupations of the movement. What else do you call that? A respect of our constitutional right to free assembly and to address our government of our grievances? No. If you wish to challenge this? Fine. I'll provide all the links and sources you'd like but..

          this is what you are missing. The thrust of Rushdi's piece about courage was indeed equating Tiananmen square, Noam, and OWS in the same category because they were fighting for the same thing. The indomitable ability of the human spirit to triumph in the face of oppression and stand against abuses of human rights, economic inequality, and a broken political system.

          There was a reason Rushdi said OWS and not the Tea Party..

          As for my signature:

          "I don't know that there are a lot of Cubans or Venezuelans, Americans who believe that," Obama said. "The truth of the matter is that my policies are so mainstream that if I had set the same policies that I had back in the 1980s, I would be considered a moderate Republican."
          Guess who said that?

          President Obama would have been a republican in the 1980's & 1990's. Go figure.

          by Tool on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 08:07:52 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  OWS is the flavor you like. I get that. (0+ / 0-)

            Betcha an awful lot of the union members and not-so-young folks who showed up would have more in common with a lot of the Tea Party folks than you can imagine.

            The college students?
            Well, they are a special case.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 02:18:00 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  If you boil down the protests (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Miggles

      of the Tea Party versus OWS to simplistic things like "the government is too powerful", you might have a point.
      Beyond that, they were wildly divergent, IMO.
      The most obvious divergence is the choice of the tea party to use their power to affect the electoral process, while OWS scorned it, to their detriment.

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:39:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I mean at the ordinary folks level (0+ / 0-)

        A point where philosophies tend to get a little blurry anyway.

        But -- yes, of course, the political viewpoints were different.

        The people?

        Maybe not so different -- especially if you include union members among the Occupy ranks.

        Regardless of the actual politics, passions, thoughts, sincerity, etc of either group,  Tea Party types were a bunch of tri-corner freak sheep from the standpoint of many Kossacks.
        I am confident that Red Stater had an equivalent view of the Occupy crowd.

        Relevant to  the author's discussion, the propaganda push to spin the couragious and principled into enemies and freaks can happen only with an army of willing co-conspirators.

        Think about the Tea Party folks for a minute, the ordinary people who showed up in public at rallies, identified themselves with a set of principles, talked to their friends and neighbors, etc.  And, as noted, took an active interest in the electoral process.  Agree or disagree violently, that is a fundamentally admirable and courageous thing in an age of low-information disengaged voting age citizens.

        Unless you're a Kossack, in which case they were counter-revolutionary group.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 07:15:02 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Now you are just making (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Miggles

          an idiot of yourself. The only connection between the tea party and OWS is that you do not like them and you do not like them because the WH does not like them.

          Enough of this trying to blur them into one- it  is disingenuous at best.

          •  No, but you are proving my point. (0+ / 0-)

            Your membership card in the vast left-wing conspiracy is in the mail, as is your La-Z-Boy Deep Thinkers Club membership.

            BTW --

            I defy you to find anything anywhere that I have written disapproving of OWS.

            From my point of view, the comparison is strictly complimentary.  I think highly of ordinary people exercising their passions and getting involved in the political process.  A representative government cannot function well when the electorate checks out of the process.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 08:05:49 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  huh? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      middleagedhousewife, Miggles
      Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party movement (at the rubber meets the road level, at least) were very much the same thing expressing many of the same frustrations from different points of view.
      Think you need to read more before writing  on this.

      Suspect that you consider them similar because they were both critical of the current WH occupant but I could be wrong.

      •  I've done a lot of reading on this. (0+ / 0-)

        I supsect that I've done a lot more thinking on the topic than you have.  

        The biggest similarity -- though not expressed identically -- is that both groups were highly pissed  off at a government and a society that favors the 1% over the 99%.

        Lots of differences in other areas.
        Lots of differences in how the frustration is expressed.
        Lots of differences in belief ast to root cause.

        I would bet, however, if it were possible to step into a way-back machine (you old enough to get that reference?) and step into the middle of a Tea Party Crowd and an OWS crowd and start talking about the TARP, bailouts, and Wall Street bonuses, the reaction of each group would have been about the same.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 08:18:00 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Salman... (0+ / 0-)

    Bad Wolf.

    No, I didn’t mean that. But it was, it was a better life. I don’t mean all the travelling and seeing aliens and spaceships and things. That don't matter. The Doctor showed me a better way of living your life. You know, he showed you too. You don't just give up. You don’t just let things happen. You make a stand. You say "no." You have the guts to do what's right when everyone else just runs away! and I just can't...!
  •  the right's relentless efforts to tank the economy (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    hulibow, tobendaro, Ohkwai

    go on and on and the media, which at one point, reported on this obvious fact a little has decided to move on. move on they might but the effects of sequestration, infrastructure degradation, childhood hunger, banking and investment scams and so on continue to rot the spirit of the people and undermine this nations ability to actualize it's potential. the objective of the right is to destroy our democracy in order to save it.....a phrase i remember from long ago that was applied to a village in one of those asian countries we felt we needed to destroy. i guess it is the right that really "brought the war home".

  •  Obama's decision about what to do about (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    litho, tobendaro, skohayes, One Opinion, Sylv

    Syria is much more difficult than most black/white pundits make it out to be.  The NYT article today titled "Islamist Rebels Create Dilemma on Syria Policy" describes the factions fighting the Assad regime and describes the choices the president faces in that country's civil war:

    In Syria’s largest city, Aleppo, rebels aligned with Al Qaeda control the power plant, run the bakeries and head a court that applies Islamic law. Elsewhere, they have seized government oil fields, put employees back to work and now profit from the crude they produce.

    Across Syria, rebel-held areas are dotted with Islamic courts staffed by lawyers and clerics, and by fighting brigades led by extremists. Even the Supreme Military Council, the umbrella rebel organization whose formation the West had hoped would sideline radical groups, is stocked with commanders who want to infuse Islamic law into a future Syrian government.

    Nowhere in rebel-controlled Syria is there a secular fighting force to speak of.

    Civilians caught in the chaos of war are wont to support any group that brings even the least stability into their lives, and the imposition of Sharia law does not alarm the population nearly as much as wondering where their next loaf of bread is coming from.
    “We all want an Islamic state and we want Shariah to be applied,” said Maawiya Hassan Agha, a rebel activist reached by Skype in the northern village of Sarmeen. He said a country’s laws should flow from its people’s beliefs and compared Syrians calling for Islamic law with the French banning Muslim women from wearing face veils.

    “In France, people don’t like face veils so they passed laws against them,” he said. “It’s the same thing here. It’s our right to push for the laws we want.”

    This is a two-page article that gives an excellent overview of what's happening on the ground among the forces fighting the Syrian army.  If you're looking for an explanation that eschews the usual good guy/bad guy dichotomy and details the ugly choices President Obama faces, this is today's best read.

    "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

    by SueDe on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:25:21 AM PDT

  •  We have lots ot courageous Americans. Just look (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Cartoon Peril

    at all of those standing up to that "dictator" Obama.

    The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy;the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness

    by CTMET on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:32:27 AM PDT

  •  Holberts column is just sad (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Miggles

    Sums up why I have an aversion to even touching a gun. I envision my husbands hunting rifle going off even when I am just carrying it by the handles on the case - I know, completely irrational but it is what it is.
    In local punditry is a (probably recycled from earlier in the week) Krauthammer column declaring that history will vindicate Bush's achievements. 1) He kept us safe and 2) War - WTF. Nice try Chuck.

    Organizing is what you do before you do something, so that when you do it, it is not all mixed up. A. A. Milne

    by hulibow on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 05:35:28 AM PDT

  •  Ashis Nandy (0+ / 0-)

    is cited as an example of moral courage in the linked op-ed by Rushdie. He got in trouble for saying, "It is a fact that most of the corrupt come from OBCs and Scheduled Castes and now increasingly the Scheduled Tribes. I will give an example. One of the states with the least amount of corruption is state of West Bengal when the CPI(M) was there. And I must draw attention to the fact that in the last 100 years, nobody from OBC, SC and ST has come anywhere near to power. It is an absolutely clean state."

    For us Americans—the Scheduled Castes and Tribes are lowest of the traditional castes. The OBC refers to the Other Backward Castes. The CPI(M) is the Communist Party of India (Maoist).

  •  GOP needs 'a new message, a new messenger, a (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes

    new tone'....Other than that, they're doing just fine.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

    •  Or more hand-picked voters, (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet

      which is being arranged in the states Republicans now control.  What the voters want actually makes no difference, but it's helpful if the voting is limited to those who already agree with Republican policy positions, which gives the Republicans the opportunity to claim that they're carrying out the will of the voters.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:42:28 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  small note on gun incident: who hands someone (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    xxdr zombiexx, maryabein, SueDe, Kimbeaux

    a loaded gun to examine and who pulls back the hammer to determine if there is a live round in the chamber and who pulls a hammer back twice, if the owner had the old West trick of having the hammer drop on an empty chamber?

    There are so many things wrong with the recitation and errors made, I assume the author had never handled a revolver before to know to open the cylinder to determine the "load" in the gun.  I also assume the gun was a Saturday night special which relied upon the hammer acting as the only safety.

    No one trained in firearms should ever hand a loaded pistol to anyone to "examine". Never point the gun towards someone.  Never pull back the hammer when you are holding the gun by the barrel.

    I agree though that untrained idiots should not be allowed access to a firearm until they have undergone a certified training course or military or police training.  I would even agree with mandatory re-testing after a certain number of years just to take the rust off.  

    •  These are the folks who need their guns impounded, (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      entlord, 88kathy, Miggles

      who need to take a mandated safety course or to, then have (and pay for) a hearing to see if they can get their guns back, and then on a probationary condition.

      That will probably create court jobs.

    •  The article states it was a service revolver (0+ / 0-)

      One of the occupants of the car was a LEO.

      The driver, who worked with the county sheriff’s department, offered me his service revolver to examine.

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:43:40 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks to Bruce Holbert for having the courage to (0+ / 0-)

    revisit publicly what must be a horrible burden.

    You can't make this stuff up.

    by David54 on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:33:59 AM PDT

  •  Any word on how the proposed NC "nipple law" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Kimbeaux, One Opinion

    is progressing? Fyi:
    (From February in The Hollywood Gossip)
    =============
    The proposed legislation, House Bill 34, would make it a Class H felony to expose "external organs of sex and of excretion, including the nipple."

    The law also extends to "any portion of the areola." Good to know.

    Depending on the intent, women could face up to six months in prison for an errant areola, with "more mundane" exposure resulting in a 30-day sentence. There is an exemption for breastfeeding.

    Rep. Rayne Brown (R), who co-sponsored the bill, tells WRAL in Raleigh that while it may seem frivolous or even funny, it can also be a serious issue. "There are communities across this state, local governments across this state, and local law enforcement for whom this issue is really not a laughing matter."

    Brown said that she was prompted, in part, by Asheville's second annual topless protest and women's rally this past August. What went down there?
    =
    ==============

    "They will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the American economy. The full faith and credit of the United States of America is not a bargaining chip."

    by TofG on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 06:48:47 AM PDT

  •  Rushdie (0+ / 0-)

    He is right, of course but this isn't a new phenomenum.  The first time I remember this redefinition of an event we all had seen was the 1969 Dem Convention.  We watched the footage of kids sitting in the street being charged by police.  After a fairly short while, the stations stopped showing the pictures and began describing the events as a riot.

  •  Doctor Who references (0+ / 0-)

    are a huge reason as to why I enjoy being at this site.

    Bless everyone.

    19, FL-07 (school), MD-07 (home). UCF sophomore, politically ambitious, vocally liberal--what else could you need to know?

    by tqycolumbia on Sun Apr 28, 2013 at 08:36:32 AM PDT

  •  Thanks for posting the Doyle McManus segment. (0+ / 0-)

    The full article (referenced in diary) is worth a read.

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