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Why do you hover your cursor over a diary's title, seeking clues as to whether it is worth your while to open and read?  An evocative title, even if unclear, may draw you in.  Human beings seek meaning in ambiguity, a subset of order in chaos, and it is natural to....

Are you here yet?  Good.  I wasn't sure how long I could keep that up.  Back before hovering cursors gave you a snippet of a diary's content, I could have just put up the title and gone right into it.  No more.  I wanted the title alone to be what brought you in, if you came in.

Welcome.  Relax.  It's a game.  It should be a fun game.  If you like it, we can play it again and again.  It's a game that shows how we do make meaning in ambiguity.  It's a chance to express some wit, perhaps, perhaps some insight, as well as to take a collective public Rorshach test.  I think that we may learn a lot from it.  Take it seriously and have fun.

I had a dream last night, or maybe it was just a moment in one of the hypnogogic or hypnopompic transitions to or from wakefulness to sleep and back, and suddenly I had a phrase in my mind: "the long slow stain of mimicry."  Don't bother looking for it; it's not in Google (until any moment, now when this diary itself gets archived.)

It struck me as the title of a particularly interesting academic paper, something followed by a colon that spelled out, over thirteen to twenty-three words, the actual finding of the study, almost certainly less evocatively.

My question for you is: based on your understanding of the words and the world, what is that academic paper about?

Some of you will want to respond with a snarky answer of five words or less.  (I'd be one of the worst offenders in this respect, I'm imagine, if I didn't first read the admonishment in this very paragraph.)  If you do so, you're playing the game, I suppose -- but you're not playing it well.  The joy to be had is in taking this inkblot and seeing where it might take us if we take it seriously.  Try taking it seriously.  Stare into the crystal ball and tell us what you see.  If you see nothing, you can say nothing -- at least as a top-level comment.  (Everyone is welcome to react to other people's suggestions, of course.)

Take your time.  Think your answer through.  It has to explain the employment of the words "long," "slow," "stain," and "mimicry" -- as well as, I suppose, "the" and "of."  My guess is that, if this works, we may learn more from the responses to this diary than we learn from most others.  It's just a game -- and games are very serious.  So take it with the utmost seriousness you can muster -- and have fun.

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Comment Preferences

  •  I'm timing this one to be published at a time (16+ / 0-)

    when I'm going to be in a Democratic Party meeting, in the evening but not too late into the evening, so that it's not impinging on breaking news but enough people may still see it to generate a critical mass.  In any event, I won't have to think about it in real time.  I'll just come back, probably somewhat agitated, and it will be full or empty or somewhere in between, and the question will be, to the extent that it is filled at all -- with what?  I trust you to find something good.

    It's an experiment.  Sometimes they fail, sometimes not.  We are experimenters.

    "I love this goddamn country, and we're going to take it back."

                                                           -- Saul Alinsky

    by Seneca Doane on Mon May 13, 2013 at 11:04:42 AM PDT

  •  "the long slow stain of mimicry." (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    commonmass, sceptical observer

    How to write a paper to get a good grade from a narcissist ,
    get the degree , then get a job so that the loans can be paid off .
    Or maybe I don't have 1/2 a clue .

    Drop the name-calling MB 2/4/11 + Please try to use ratings properly! Kos 9/9/11 + Trusted Users have a responsibility to police the general tenor... Hunter 5/26/06

    by indycam on Mon May 13, 2013 at 07:39:42 PM PDT

  •  Hahahahaha! (7+ / 0-)

    Love the opening.  I did hover!  Then I felt like I'd been caught drinking milk from the carton!

    Hmmm.  "The Long, Slow Stain of Mimicry."  I'm sorry, but all I can think of is Rich Little.

    Yeah.  Fail.  I know.

    Can you call yourself a real liberal if you aren't reading driftglass?

    by CJB on Mon May 13, 2013 at 07:50:29 PM PDT

  •  OTOH... (4+ / 0-)

    ...there are those who feel "Snakes on a Plane" is simply less work.

    Boehner Just Wants Wife To Listen, Not Come Up With Alternative Debt-Reduction Ideas

    by dov12348 on Mon May 13, 2013 at 07:56:39 PM PDT

  •  "The long slow stain of mimicry: (5+ / 0-)

    "Ridicule is the only weapon which can be used against unintelligible propositions." - Thomas Jefferson

    by rfall on Mon May 13, 2013 at 07:59:18 PM PDT

  •  13 to 23 word parameter. (6+ / 0-)

    How mimicking parents social adaptation behavior stifles infants creativity in developing self and the long-term ramifications to society's survival.

    I don't have a clue what that means.

    "The human eye is a wonderful device. With a little effort, it can fail to see even the most glaring injustice." Richard K. Morgan

    by sceptical observer on Mon May 13, 2013 at 08:07:40 PM PDT

  •  My take: (8+ / 0-)
    The Long Slow Stain of Mimicry

    Misguided and Regressive Cultural Traditions that Emerged from Temporary Adaptations to Crisis in the Distant Past.

    A Study in Profound Human Folly.

    I love your brain games.



    Denial is a drug.

    by Pluto on Mon May 13, 2013 at 08:10:46 PM PDT

  •  Academic deconstruction of (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sceptical observer, Pluto

    The Colour Out of Space.

  •  The key word to scry is “mimicry” (5+ / 0-)

    You say it’s a scientific paper? OK.

    Theory #1: There are butterflies or moths that taste bad to birds. And there are butterflies (or moths) which aren’t eaten by birds because they have coloring that’s similar to the first species. Evolutionarily speaking, they evolved to mimic the coloring as a survival mechanism. That’s a guess for the scientific part, but I don’t know where the “long slow stain” comes in.

    My #2 theory is that the word “mimic” applies to people who copy someone. Like comedians who can do impressions of someone famous, such as the President of the U.S. Or people who create parodies of literature or of songs. Or people who plagiarize. Or people who parrot talking points from Fox News. I can see where there might be a stain involved. Because the work is not original, it’s copying. It’s not art, it’s a copy of art.

    Just a guess.

    "Stupid just can't keep its mouth shut." -- SweetAuntFanny's grandmother.

    by Dbug on Mon May 13, 2013 at 08:31:36 PM PDT

  •  "The long slow stain of mimicry" is an (6+ / 0-)

    unpublished literary work reportedly siezed by the Russians in the winter of 1946 from the ruins of an East Berlin apartment building.

    While the author has remained unknown, many believe it could only have been penned by either one of the Fuhrer's stenographers, or less likely, someone who had access to one of the stenographers.

    The document cites 97 references to the USA made by the fuhrer to his inner circle in explaining why his policies of resettlement & genocide were in accordance with tried historical methods.

    When "The long slow stain of mimicry" first surfaced in 2001 it had by that time acquired an attachment of several pages written in Russian. These additional pages, written by some unknown Russian scholar (or so it is believed due to the copious amounts of footnotes scribbled on the back of the last page), added provacative notations attempting to link the process of colonization of North America by England to earlier genocidal conflicts between Spain & both the Aztec & Incan empires.

    There have also appeared, from time-to-time, purported lost pages of "The long slow stain of miimcry" on the Internet. The most infamous of which predicted that should Germany lose the war, then America would take up the banner of anti-Communism as a smoekscreen behind which to fulfill the German dream of world conquest.

    Some have attempted (without achieving any notable traction) to use "The long slow stain of mimicry" as evidence that the world is locked in a long-term suicidal/genocidal maelstrom that is reflected in an otherwise unexplainable thirst by the US to encircle the globes with military outposts, while ignoring the coming ecological extinction of human life on the planet. Those attempts have not been successful.

    Most legitimate scholars doubt the authenticity of "The long slow stain of mimicry" & compare those who believe in it to the beknighted souls who insist (despite all evidence to the contrary) that H.P. Lovecraft's Necronomicon was based on a once existing book.

    The Americas greatest political dynasty...the Kaan

    by catilinus on Mon May 13, 2013 at 08:54:38 PM PDT

    •  ahhhh..... (5+ / 0-)
      A man knows when he is growing old
      because he begins to look like his father.

      -- Gabriel Garcia Marquez

      Don't let anyone tell you otherwise, before the police arrive ... teachers are first responders.

      by 8ackgr0und N015e on Mon May 13, 2013 at 10:42:45 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Amazing -- I hadn't known any of this! (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      CroneWit, catilinus, Pluto

      (thanks for playing -- and for playing so well....)

      "I love this goddamn country, and we're going to take it back."

                                                             -- Saul Alinsky

      by Seneca Doane on Mon May 13, 2013 at 11:25:52 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Most excellent, catilinus! (7+ / 0-)

      The Editor's Preface to the long-anticipated Complete Revised and Annotated Fourth Edition of 2437.

      The Fourth Edition is particularly welcomed by scholars in a variety of disciplines not only for its accuracy but for its inclusion of an extremely well-sourced Afterword, 'History and Interpretations of 'The Long Slow Stain of Mimicry' Through the Centuries'.

      Section One of this Afterword concerns itself with the social and political history of 'Mimicry' beginning with its first printing in 2007 on First Earth and ending with its continuing influence on the globes since encircled by the US through the beneficence of the Corporate Coalition for Evermore Everything, which sponsored the Fourth Edition's publication.

      Section Two, 'Interpretations' offers a wealth of information on the cultural, rather than the historico-political, influence of 'Mimicry' since its appearance in First US on First Earth.  When the first pirated copies appeared on what was then called 'the Internet', a huge upheaval arose as varied segments of First-US society appropriated it and applied no less than 137 interpretations to its fragmented, difficult, and opaque text.  

      Of course, each separate group believed wholeheartedly, and argued vehemently, that their own interpretation was the One True Way to Understand 'Mimicry'.  To aid understanding, these varying interpretations, in their early stages, have been broadly categorized in the Fourth Edition's Afterword as being either 'Literalist' or 'Open' interpreters.

      The Literalist camps each believed that the plain text of 'Mimicry' was to be accepted and acted upon as 'literally, categorically, and objectively true'.  Roughly forty-seven early groups claimed to have the correct 'literal' interpretation, while approximately 92 early groups which adopted the 'open interpretation' model claimed to have the correct 'open' interpretation.  Of course, history teaches us that this early period of relatively coherent discourse on 'Mimicry' did not last long:  Within a mere twelve years, no less that 1,243 distinct schools of thought and practice existed as groups split, and split again, over details and minutiae.

      The Fourth Edition's Afterword is a useful compendium of information that will provide generations of students with ample material for further research.  However, the Fourth Edition's Afterword is written in such an accessible way style that even the casual reader will find entertainment and items of interest therein.

      One example of information that may be of interest to casual readers is the Afterword's delineation of the development of the Mimicry-inspired neologism, 'smoekscreen' -- which, sadly, has gone somewhat out of fashion.  'Smoekscreen', the Afterword informs us, is considered a 'portmanteau word' comprised of two existing words to create a third word (see: Alice In Wonderland).  The word 'smokescreen' (a battlefield word, referring to (1) clouds of smoke from gunpowder-based weapons on an ancient battlefield and (2) a cloud of dust or smoke that prevents one group of combatants from seeing the other, often purposely created as a tactical device so that one group could escape the other; it was later used to describe other forms (often verbal forms) of intentional obscuring of actual events.  This existing word 'smokescreen' was combined (circa 2013) with the jargon-derived word 'schmo' (long 'o', as in 'toe'), which carried the slang meaning of 'dumb,clueless, standing around with his face hanging out' (as we might say currently, a 'dorkpod').  'Schmoe', it is believed, was shortened to 'smoe' due to its frequent use on an early socialcom service that limited the characters used to a mere 140 characters.  After the word 'schmo/smoe' came into common usage to describe legislators, the 'k' sound was introduced (both in speech and socialcom) as a kind of gagging, hacking sound to express disgust.  Thus, the Afterword informs us, the Mimicry-inspired neologism 'smoekscreen' came to carry the meaning 'the words and actions of a stupid, clueless person (usually governmental) who is speaking and acting in one way in order to hide the fact that s/he's doing something else (and that's disgusting)'

      Some might consider the information in the paragraph above to be quite a bit of baggage for one portmanteau to carry.  The casual reader, and the younger academic as well, will find the Fourth Edition's detailed Glossary, complete with a section on Indo-European root-words, will be a great benefit to them as they read and enjoy this ancient work.

      All gratitude to the CCEE for this work and the many benefits it provides!

      •  I believe that we have just discovered (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        CroneWit, catilinus, Pluto

        the origin of dark matter!  Well done!

        "I love this goddamn country, and we're going to take it back."

                                                               -- Saul Alinsky

        by Seneca Doane on Mon May 13, 2013 at 11:43:23 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Good gad, Holmes, I do believe you've done it! (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        catilinus, Seneca Doane, CroneWit, CJB

        Just incredible.

        At least half the future I've been expecting hasn't gotten here yet. Sigh.... (Yes, there's gender bias in my name; no, I wasn't thinking about it when I signed up. My apologies.)

        by serendipityisabitch on Mon May 13, 2013 at 11:50:27 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Crone, an almost excellent & well-researched (4+ / 0-)

        update...only (sadly) marred by one glaringly abyssmal error.

        (emphasis below added by myself)

        Of course, history teaches us that this early period of relatively coherent discourse on 'Mimicry' did not last long:  Within a mere twelve years, no less that 1,243 distinct schools of thought and practice existed as groups split, and split again, over details and minutiae.
        Von Haushofer spent over 20 years proving beyond a shadow of a doubt that there were actually 1,244 disntinct schools of thought. You either disagree with his inclusion of the Bambschnozzle group, or you're not aware of it. I truly hope it is the former. Otherwise, well done!

        The Americas greatest political dynasty...the Kaan

        by catilinus on Tue May 14, 2013 at 12:14:56 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Re-read your post again. Am changing prior (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        CroneWit, Seneca Doane, Pluto

        analysis. Es chingada brillante. Fantastic on all levels. 'smoekscreen'...rofl.

        The Americas greatest political dynasty...the Kaan

        by catilinus on Tue May 14, 2013 at 02:10:30 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Couldn't have done it without you! (4+ / 0-)

          Or without SD, of course.  Thanks to you both, and to serendipityisabitch.

          This is SO much fun!

          And may I say I appreciate your defense of  Von Haushofer and the Bambschnozzle group.  I'm sure you can understand that limitations of space in what must be a brief preface forced this writer to make hard decisions about how to compose a brief overview that will inform the reader of the arc and scope of the Afterword without overwhelming him/her.  (And one must keep the casual reader always in mind, as I'm sure you're aware.)

          I trust you will find the choices made by the writers and editors of Afterword more satisfactory than my poor and limited effort in the Preface.  In a lengthy footnote (page 187), the reader will be informed of the lengthy and rigorous scholarly discussion that led to the choice of '12 years/1,243 distinct groups'.  I will summarize that discussion here, since you have expressed an interest, although I'm sure you will find the Afterword's fuller treatment more satisfactory.

          During that twelfth year, there was (as most scholars agree) a brief period of approximately 7-8 weeks in August through September (although some still say 12 weeks, beginning as early as June), during which the identifiably distinct interpretations reached a kind of dynamic equilibrium.  (A few overconfident souls went as far as to write letters to the editors of various journals rejoicing in the belief that 'the end of interpretation has come'.    How well I remember the gales of laughter that shook the classroom when my second-year colleagues and I were told of this period, and what enjoyment we derived from the required reading for that course!)

          Of course, we understand now that this brief lull was a result of the weather -- it was the Year of Summer-As-It-Used-To-Be, you will recall, when all but the most essential work went undone.  But Bambschnozzle's core concepts of meta-interpretation (Restraint, Perspicacity, Verve) had already begun to circulate and ferment among various schools of interpretation, leading to a re-vivification in many schools and leading to innovative thinking such as the 'Judiciously Open' and 'Relaxed Literalism' movements.

          The Afterword relies heavily on Von Haushofer in its discussion of Bambschnozzlist thought and influence and indeed name that following winter (The Winter That Never Seemed To End) as 'The Period of Glorious Flowering' that led to the lengthy and fruitful 'Resurgence of 'Mimicry' ' era.

          Limitations of time constrain me to another brief overview, but I hope my poor efforts will satisfy your concerns until the Fourth Edition is released.  And limitations of time will, alas, prevent me from entering into an extended correspondence with you on these issues.  You are welcome to quote from this response on the Forums, under the standard Fair Use and Respectful Citations guidelines.

          I hope you will find the Fourth Edition, and its Afterword, useful as a scholarly resource and that it will ample food for further thought and discussion as the interpretation of The Long, Slow Stain of Mimicry continues.

          With sincere best wishes, and with thanks for your expression of scholarly concern.

          •  Oh... My... Word... I think you topped yourself. (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            CroneWit, Seneca Doane, Pluto, ancblu

            I do wish, however, to draw your attention to your duplicate use of the word 'brief' in the first paragraph. As a scholar, you should well be aware, allusions to the commonality aside, that THIS WILL NOT DO. An alternate usage of 'constrained', perhaps, or, in extremis, 'short' would have upheld our dignity more fittingly.

            Yours in all humility,

            At least half the future I've been expecting hasn't gotten here yet. Sigh.... (Yes, there's gender bias in my name; no, I wasn't thinking about it when I signed up. My apologies.)

            by serendipityisabitch on Tue May 14, 2013 at 10:17:36 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Putting a comment here to bookmark this (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Seneca Doane, CroneWit

            location to let you know I have seen your post. I will return when work allows. Your update cannot be allowed to long remain unchallenged.

            The Americas greatest political dynasty...the Kaan

            by catilinus on Tue May 14, 2013 at 01:33:23 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Um, . . . hello? (4+ / 0-)

              Um, . . . hello?  Hello, Hi, this is Miss Pettijohn, the Director's assistant.  The junior assistant. .  . you know the Director . . . that you've been corresponding with?  I'm ah, I'm afraid I have to tell you . . . I mean I've been told to say . . . that the Director has been forced to retire to a dimly-lit room for a long lie-down with a cool cloth dipped in lavender-water over his eyes, with the fan on, for a while.  For an indefinite period, I mean.  I'm, ah, supposed to tell you that, um, although the Director welcomes your correspondence he asks you to consider the frailties of age and generously grant him leave to delay his response somewhat.

              Oh, and, he says to tell you that he deeply regrets being incom -- incommoded, and, um hopes that his, um, indisposition will not inconvenience you too severely. He looks forward, he says, to a continuing discussion and regrets that his strength and the demands of his superiors on his time may unfortunately require him to delay his response.

              He says to say With Sincere Good Wishes.

              Okay, um, bye.

              •  I am soooo impressed! (4+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                CroneWit, Seneca Doane, catilinus, 2thanks



                Denial is a drug.

                by Pluto on Tue May 14, 2013 at 07:26:32 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  My dear Miss Pettijohn, (2+ / 0-)

                I certainly appreciate your candor in relating to me the causes which will prevent further correspondence between the Director and myself. I truly am sorry to hear he has succumed to an apparent nervous disorder.

                I imagine your situaton is a difficult one. There must be diverse contingencies you are now forced to deal with in attempting to wrap up various projects initiated by the director. No doubt you were left with no writtin instructions. This makes it doubly hard for me to add to your newly acquired responsibilities by requesting your aid in the retrieval of certain items (trinkets really) of which I am the legal owner.

                1. The Spear of Longinus.

                2. A copy of De Vermis Mysteriis.

                3. A 2nd Century Mayan Codex bearing the Kaan glyph.

                4. Julius Ceasar's original notes on his involvement in the betrayal of Catiline.

                5. The 22nd edition of former President Bristol Palin's "How I helped President Tagg Romney to retire early to Gitmo."

                Having now just written my request I realize the extreme unliklihood of your being able to fulfill it. From what I've kenned of the Director's personality and trust level, it cannot be hoped that he would have vouchsafed to you even the merest hint of the existence of these items. That necessarily being so, combined with my own inability to leave the area in which I currently reside, only one course of action is left to me.

                I shall burn my own incomplete copy of "The Long Slow Stain of Mimicry." The Stain cannot be removed from history, but those who have seen it can be. I am more an antique Roman than a Dane.

                (The above note was found inside a partially burnt and locked dioexerous box. The body next to it was burnt beyond recognition and has never been identified. The key to the box was found nearby. Authorities speculate the person had set themselves on fire and then attempted to employ the key to retrieve the contents of the box.)

                The Americas greatest political dynasty...the Kaan

                by catilinus on Wed May 15, 2013 at 12:23:46 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

      •  I'd sort of like to send this whole subthread to (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        CroneWit, serendipityisabitch

        Top Comments, but I'm not sure that Top Comments is ready for this....

        "I love this goddamn country, and we're going to take it back."

                                                               -- Saul Alinsky

        by Seneca Doane on Tue May 14, 2013 at 02:54:26 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes, it seems (2+ / 0-)

          to have taken on a life of its own.  Which is kinda fun, imo.

          •  Well, it *was* supposed to! (0+ / 0-)

            We are winning the game.

            "I love this goddamn country, and we're going to take it back."

                                                                   -- Saul Alinsky

            by Seneca Doane on Tue May 14, 2013 at 09:59:19 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  It may be of some use to you in your (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Seneca Doane

          decision to note that the initial stimulus for such a fruitful and solidly academic discussion is inextricably mixed with both the quality of the audience in attendance and the cross-pollination of the developmental matrix.

          In other words to do it right you'd have to send the diary itself to Top Comments, because it wouldn't have happened otherwise. I don't think they let you do that.

          At least half the future I've been expecting hasn't gotten here yet. Sigh.... (Yes, there's gender bias in my name; no, I wasn't thinking about it when I signed up. My apologies.)

          by serendipityisabitch on Tue May 14, 2013 at 10:48:38 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Oh, hell, I'm gonna send it anyway - boggling (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Seneca Doane

          a few minds is a positive action.

          At least half the future I've been expecting hasn't gotten here yet. Sigh.... (Yes, there's gender bias in my name; no, I wasn't thinking about it when I signed up. My apologies.)

          by serendipityisabitch on Wed May 15, 2013 at 02:13:49 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  The Long Slow Stain of Mimicry: (5+ / 0-)

    Adult humans each display personalities of many colors and textures. How mimicry in childhood provides a deep base, and how, through puberty to adulthood, it comes to accent all other traits.

    A few words over the limit, and maybe not so academic. Fun though.

    Thanks.

    "Every book is like a door"

    by Hammerhand on Mon May 13, 2013 at 08:58:04 PM PDT

  •  There was once a young man (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Seneca Doane

    quite smart who wanted to get ahead. But he was lazy. So instead of writing his own life, he copied one from a prince. Just as the prince rose from poverty to rule a mighty empire, so did pour young man. But being an imitator rather than a real-lifer, he never got the feel of being an emperor. He just played at one, letting his sycophants run the empire. Down.

    Soon arose a revolution. The young man was overthrown. The guillotine, he faced. The moment arrived- : he put his head down on the wooden block. The swish of the blade. His head, still thinking and seeing, pops out, looks down on the stain of blood on the floor. His last thought was, 'the long stain of mimicry runs crimson!'

  •  You were more fun, Seneca, when (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pluto

    you were a Major.

    Irony takes a worse beating from Republicans than Wile E. Coyote does from Acme. --Tara the Antisocial Social Worker

    by Youffraita on Mon May 13, 2013 at 09:57:22 PM PDT

  •  I came back to this (5+ / 0-)

    because you reminded me that only once in my 52-year life have I dreamed words that I could actually read.  Always, writing is murky.  Except for one time from - what -25 years ago, maybe.

    "...the sacredness of darkness, the profanity of light..."

    That was all.  Disembodied from any meaning.  White paper on a small wooden table.  

    Dark and light get lots of play out there.  So do the sacred and the profane.  But the words seem - "needy" somehow in their arrangement.  Why are they seemingly backwards?

    So. I'm being off topic and tangential.  I'm sorry that I can't yet speak to your dream words.  But I thank you for bringing back mine.

    Can you call yourself a real liberal if you aren't reading driftglass?

    by CJB on Mon May 13, 2013 at 10:00:14 PM PDT

    •  Mmm - thinking that line could be (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Seneca Doane, Pluto

      an interesting start for coming up with a new alien race for a story - or maybe a Republican...

      Quip aside, it's a lovely line, and draws the mind into testing and stretching the boundaries.

      At least half the future I've been expecting hasn't gotten here yet. Sigh.... (Yes, there's gender bias in my name; no, I wasn't thinking about it when I signed up. My apologies.)

      by serendipityisabitch on Mon May 13, 2013 at 10:26:06 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  A thirty year study on the probability that (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Seneca Doane, CroneWit, Pluto

    children of abusive parents will, over time, take on the characteristics of those parents as they enter into adult situations where similar external factors exist.

    A companion study, or a wider study, which followed children to see under what circumstances and to what extent they took on both positive and negative characteristics of their parents would perhaps be more interesting, but I can't quite fit 'stain' into that one.

    Interesting.

    At least half the future I've been expecting hasn't gotten here yet. Sigh.... (Yes, there's gender bias in my name; no, I wasn't thinking about it when I signed up. My apologies.)

    by serendipityisabitch on Mon May 13, 2013 at 10:13:57 PM PDT

    •  I waited to read the rest of the replies (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Seneca Doane

      until I'd finished that one, and my conclusion is that I'm way too serious for my own good.

      You're right about the hover - it does influence my choice of diaries quire a bit...

      At least half the future I've been expecting hasn't gotten here yet. Sigh.... (Yes, there's gender bias in my name; no, I wasn't thinking about it when I signed up. My apologies.)

      by serendipityisabitch on Mon May 13, 2013 at 10:21:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I like this one a lot! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      serendipityisabitch

      Thank you for hovering -- and for following through!

      "I love this goddamn country, and we're going to take it back."

                                                             -- Saul Alinsky

      by Seneca Doane on Mon May 13, 2013 at 11:28:52 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  It's the PhD Dissertation I Always Wanted to Write (4+ / 0-)

    and defend at the Kennedy School of Government ...

    The Long Slow Stain of Mimicry: The Persistence of Tudor Revival Style as Low IQ Architectural Excreta in the Southern California Residential Community
    •  That works quite well (4+ / 0-)

      As an Angeleno, I hide my face in shame in the face of such truth.

      "I love this goddamn country, and we're going to take it back."

                                                             -- Saul Alinsky

      by Seneca Doane on Tue May 14, 2013 at 07:41:17 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I logged many years in (3+ / 0-)

        El Pueblocito de Nuestra Senora de Los Angeles myself, hence my observation of the curious phenomenon of obscurantism by intentional or subliminally designed facades of poor design and execution.  The inherent superficiality of a celluloid fixation seems to influence that community quite profoundly -- in a study sample size of exactly one.

        Thus, another responsive effort to your diary challenge might be:

        The Long Slow Stain of Mimicry: Pernicious Identity Confusion as an Artifact of Fictitious Socio-Cultural Characteristics Depicted and Reinforced as Norms by Corporate Entertainment Media
        Oh well ... thanks for the amusing and provocative diversion diary.  As always, you bring an ever reliable brain to this community.
        •  I actually just had to nail my hand to my desk (4+ / 0-)

          to keep myself from sending you a grant.

          "I love this goddamn country, and we're going to take it back."

                                                                 -- Saul Alinsky

          by Seneca Doane on Tue May 14, 2013 at 02:56:02 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Thank you for the kind words at the end, too (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ancblu

          This has been every bit as fun as I'd hoped it would be.

          "I love this goddamn country, and we're going to take it back."

                                                                 -- Saul Alinsky

          by Seneca Doane on Tue May 14, 2013 at 02:56:50 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Burst out laughing when I reached (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Pluto, Seneca Doane, ancblu

          'Pernicious Identity Confusion', was laughing so hard I couldn't get past 'Artifact', then when I was able to read the next line and reached 'Fictitious Socio-Cultural Characteristics' I laughed till tears came to my eyes!

          Just super!

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