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For years now, economists using the ideas of Modern Money Theory (MMT) have been telling us that the so-called long-term “funding” problems of Social Security (SS) and Medicare emphasized incessantly by supporters of austerity are faux problems. The MMT economists believe this because the US is a currency issuer of a non-convertible fiat currency, has a floating exchange rate, and incurs no debts in any currency except US dollars. So, the US Government can issue whatever financial resources it needs to carry out its obligations without raising any solvency issues. The only problems involved in carrying out these obligations are problems of political will, not problems of financial incapacity, which is why, from an economic point of view, they are faux problems.

There are other economists who also believe these are faux problems, even though they don't subscribe to the view that the government can't become insolvent. They also view them as problems of political will because they think that the SS long term “solvency” issue can be easily solved by Congress just by lifting the payroll tax cap on income; while the problem of rising health costs threatening long term Medicare “solvency” is easily solved by passing a Medicare for All bill such as HR 676, which creates a single-payer for most health care services and puts the private insurers out of business, while holding down provider costs through negotiations.

Still other economists and fiscal policy analysts, believe, or say they believe, that the Federal Government does have fiscal limits, that the Government can only fund activities through taxing or borrowing, that deficit spending must be avoided or kept to a low level because it corresponds to growth in public debt, which will eventually create spiraling interest rates in the bond markets leading to financial insolvency for the United States, or at least to very damaging periods in which the US must impose extreme austerity on its citizens and forgo economic growth, because it must, at all costs, reduce its public debt substantially, and in short order.

These “austerians” suggest that this last fate be avoided by cutting deficits now, and, even more, by implementing long term deficit reduction plans that cut entitlements. Since the passage of the stimulus bill in 2009, the counsel of austerians of varying degree has dominated the US Government leading to conflicts among some who want to lower deficit spending to extreme levels and others who want to lower deficits more gradually and to levels a bit higher than their “starve the beast” opponents. Despite conflicts among them, the austerians have, through a few rounds of “debt ceiling,” fiscal cliff,” and “sequester” conflicts managed to implement considerable deficit reduction with serious costs to the economy and efforts to decrease unemployment substantially.

This conflict has created the present situation where the sequester and recent increases in Social Security taxes have set the stage for a “grand bargain” that would begin deep cuts in entitlements by implementing the Administration's “chained CPI” proposal. But, a number of things have now happened to slow down the austerity train and even threaten its derailment.

Reality, the Austerian Retreat, and Entitlements

The first of these things has been the record of austerian deficit reduction efforts from 2010 to the present. The impact of austerity on economies the world over has been abysmal. Unemployment in many economies, including many of the Eurozone nations is now at levels not seen since the Great Depression, and in is even higher in some nations, especially among younger workers. In addition, in many nations brutal cuts in government spending have only increased deficits and debts while creating greater unemployment.

Nations like Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the US, which haven't implemented extreme austerity after initial stimulative reactions to the crash of 2008, but also have put in place efforts at deficit reduction in response to increasing influence of the austerians, haven't suffered as much as other nations that have implemented full bore austerity. But they have suffered losses in employment and economic slowdowns as a cost of lowering deficits. The UK, which like the US, could have chosen to be less aggressive about deficit reduction, instead elected a Conservative-Liberal coalition that bought into the dogma of “expansionary austerity” and created a declining economy suffering periodic dips after the initial recession.

Second, the intellectual underpinnings of austerity have recently taken a big hit from academic studies showing spreadsheet errors, and various other errors in analysis, in the major academic studies supporting the idea that public debt-to-GDP ratios cause slower GDP growth. More and more analysts and observers now seem to believe that it is likely that low growth causes high public debt, rather than the opposite belief, which had fueled the austerity efforts of politicians and government officials.

Third, in the United States, the deficit reduction outcomes of Congressional/ Executive conflicts, while reducing actual deficits somewhat, have reduced projections of future deficits even more, and are perceived as both having reduced actual deficits and as holding back economic recovery. So, political sentiment has been gradually building against additional austerity efforts. There is now much opposition to further deficit reduction including opposition to proposals providing for entitlement cuts. And there are claims from progressives that “austerity is dead,” and advocacy that we should no longer make deficit reduction the centerpiece of fiscal policy but should immediately shift to an emphasis on creating jobs.

This past week saw a recent important defection from the ranks of advocates for austerity. The Center for American Progress (CAP) published a report by Michael Linden which concludes:

What does it mean to reset the debate? First, it means starting from the understanding that there is no longer a looming fiscal crisis—if there ever even was one. . . . .

Second, resetting the debate means discarding other fiscal theories that have fared poorly over the past several years. . . .

Third, we must recognize that there are costs to elevating deficit reduction above all other concerns. . . .

and:
. . . . we can no longer afford to pretend as if the benefits of deficit reduction always, in all circumstances, outweigh the costs. And we cannot allow the continued perception of a deficit-reduction imperative to prevent us from fixing the sequester and avoiding more economic damage.

It is time to reset the entire budget debate. No more pretending that the sky is falling. No more rash actions to cut the deficit without regard for real-world impacts. No more calls for an ever-elusive grand bargain. No more super special committees or draconian automatic punishments intended to force action. Improving our national finances is still an important goal—that has not changed. But so much else has, and the debate must change too.

It is good to see this beginning of wisdom, and even implied opposition to entitlement cuts, in a report from an organization with direct lines to the White House. But it's important not to mistake this report, with its fine rhetoric, for actual opposition to the Federal Government continuing to pursue an inadequate level of deficit spending to simultaneously contain the growth of debt while somehow creating substantially lower levels of unemployment than we have now.

Progressives and Centrists like CAP still don't understand that austerity is destroying private sector net financial assets by cutting government spending and/or raising taxes in such a way that Government additions of net financial assets to the non-government portions of the economy (government deficits) fall to a level low enough that they are less than the size of the trade balance, whether in deficit or in surplus. Right now the trade deficit is 3.5% of GDP. That means Government deficits must be at least 3.5% of GDP to prevent contraction in net private sector financial assets. That's a roughly a $560 B deficit in 2013, just to remain in place. CBO's latest projections are for a deficit of $642 Billion this year, a bit higher than break even; but not by very much. The deficit could well be smaller than that, however, since it's dropping fast.

If the economy recovers further, it's likely that the trade deficit will grow larger as a proportion of GDP. If the Government deficit isn't allowed to grow, then the result will mean declining net financial assets and greater inequality since the scramble for declining net financial assets will favor the  economically well-positioned over most of the rest of us.

The question is: will the progressives and centrists who have had enough of austerity be ready to run deficits large enough to both compensate for the trade deficit and also allow enough saving of net financial assets to fuel renewed aggregate demand and the growing consumption needed for an expanding economy? Since deficits large enough to do both might range anywhere from 6 – 10% of GDP or more, I doubt that they will be up for that, because despite their protestations about leaving austerity behind, their de-emphasis on deficit reduction doesn't mean they've abandoned their fear of increasing debt-to-GDP ratios, or their belief that high debt-to-GDP ratios are hurtful to economies.

In fact, a recent “austerity is dead” post at Think Progress (a project of the Center for American Progress Action Fund) in advocating for Michael Linden's recommendations to repeal the sequester at least for the next few years, and invest $82 Billion (roughly 1/2 of 1 percent of GDP) on “pro-growth investments” to create jobs, cites the  CBO projection favorably that shows the deficit falling sharply right now, and falling below 3% annually in 2014 and staying below that level until 2019.

But that projection is actual government austerity from now until 2019, barring a substantial decrease in our trade deficit over that period. Also, if there's no private credit bubble during this time, it's very likely that the economy will do nothing but stagnate until 2019 and beyond. We are looking at a Japanese “lost decade” scenario for the US economy.

And most “progressives” don't see it because while they joyously proclaim that “austerity is dead,” they also, with equal joy, plan for austerity-level deficits of 3% or less for the foreseeable future. Now hear this CAP, Campaign for America's Future, and other “village” DC/New York progressive organizations: Warren Buffett's 3% deficits are the very essence of austerity, as the Eurozone well knows.

Make no mistake about that. So, when you tell us that “austerity is dead,” please don't tell us at the same time that you're planning to maintain deficits at the 3% level or below, and with them austerity for the indefinite future.

And how about the more determined austerians? What do they think about the death of austerity? Well, generally, they don't believe it. They still hold that high debt-to-GDP ratios are problematic for growth. And while they're now willing to grant that it may be wise to back off deficit reduction somewhat in order to emphasize job creation a bit; austerians like the Peter G. Peterson Foundation, and the Washington Post editorial writers, are still persuaded that now is the time to pursue arrangements for long term spending reductions in Social Security and Medicare entitlements. So, for them, and for the White House, pursuit of a “grand bargain” is still not off the table that the President has so persistently set, since at least the beginning of 2010.

In brief, the hard-core austerians still believe that deficits and the GDP ratio are very important and must be reduced even at the cost of considerable economic pain for those who aren't wealthy. Given their view, it's unwise for people who really think that austerity is, or should be, dead to relax now, because it's a good bet that if the austerians can make a deal with the Republican right to reduce entitlement spending, then they will do just that, and also spring their deal on Congress suddenly and at the last moment.

The No Debt/No Inflation Platinum Coin Solution to the “Long Term Entitlement Solvency Problem”

So, let's address a solution to the long-term entitlement spending solvency problem that really kills austerity for entitlements dead. Of course, it's a faux problem in the sense that there is no economic or financial solvency problem, since the Federal Government can never involuntarily run out of money to pay Social Security and Medicare obligations, as long as Congress is willing to provide the authority to meet those obligations. But there is a real political problem in that Congress may decide not to do that because spending on entitlements in future years may exceed FICA tax revenues year after year until “the trust funds” cannot “cover” the deficit between annual tax revenues and annual spending.

The austerians want to solve this political problem by cutting back on entitlement benefits. “Progressives” want to solve it by eliminating the income cap on FICA taxation. The advantages and disadvantages of both solutions are very well-known so I won't repeat them, but will just point out that both will subtract net financial assets from the economy, and offer a third solution that doesn't have that problem.

That solution is for the Executive Branch to use its Platinum Coin Seigniorage (PCS) authority under 31 USC 5112(k) and 31 USC 5136 to mint a single proof platinum coin each year to cover any shortfall between FICA revenues and spending on Social Security and Medicare. If that were done annually in advance, based on projections, then there would be no further depletion of the “trust fund” credits, and no further political issue of Social Security and Medicare insolvency.

This solution also has at least the following other advantages.

-- It requires no Congressional action to implement. The necessary authority is there already;

-- It will not increase spending, beyond that already scheduled for Social Security and Medicare, so it won't add any inflation beyond that already built into the system;

-- It will not increase the public debt subject to the limit, so that worry needn't trouble people;

-- It will educate people about the fact that the Government can spend without having to tax or borrow if it needs to do that;

-- It will educate people about PCS as an alternative to taxing and borrowing;

-- It will educate people to the idea that neither the Treasury nor the Government can become insolvent because it can always mint coins;

-- It will educate people about the fact that the US Government need not ever borrow back its own previously issued currency from anyone else, unless it wants to;

-- It will educate people to the idea that their grandchildren won't have a burden of public debt that they can't always easily pay back by using PCS;

-- It requires neither an increase in taxes nor cuts in Social Security or Medicare benefits.

-- Also, if benefits were increased in the future there wouldn't need to be any tax increases to “fund” them.

-- It would be a great political success for any President who did this, because it would have the effect of safeguarding the major components of the safety net for good, and that President would be remembered by a grateful populace for having done that.

There are, of course, some disadvantages to this third solution, too.

-- The opposition to the President will attack she or he for using PCS, claiming that it is the dreaded “printing money,” practiced, so infamously, by the Weimar Republic and Zimbabwe. This may be an effective attack in holding down the President's approval rating for a limited period of time; but once people observe that no inflation results from using PCS, this attack will fade away; it's effectiveness destroyed by experience and reality;

-- To make PCS effective, the President may have to force the Federal Reserve Chairman to create reserves in exchange for Treasury's platinum coins. This may create a firestorm politically if the Fed Chairman resigns in protest. However, eventually, the President will find a successor who will credit the Mint's Public Enterprise Fund (PEF) account for platinum coins with very high face value, because the law is clear that in cases of disagreement between the Fed and the Secretary on matters of interpretation, the opinion of the Secretary is to prevail.

-- The opposition may attack the President for "grabbing more power." This may make a few headlines; but since the President's action would halt any further depletion of the Social Security and Medicare “trust funds” it is hard to see the public either disapproving of the action, or getting motivated by any perceived power grab.

-- The opposition to the President in Congress may become enraged by the loss of leverage against entitlement spending they experience as a result of the Administration using PCS to stop depletion of the “trust funds.” However, I can't see this anger going anywhere unless it somehow gets extended to the country at large. But, then again, the only reason why most people would get angry at this is if inflation were somehow triggered using PCS. Since this is a very unlikely prospect, the anger in Congress will just go to ground in the sweep of events.

Two weeks after the minting each year, there will be other issues to fight about. After a few years of use, PCS will be institutionalized as the way to ensure the sustainability of Social Security and Medicare regardless of fluctuations in the economy and in tax revenues.

So, that's it. Using PCS to cover the shortfall between entitlement spending and FICA revenues is a quick and relatively easy solution to the political problem of ensuring that the Social Security and Medicare “trust funds” are sustainable, provided that a president will use it. When will this, or the next, or the next president make this happen and really kill “austerity” politics targeting the entitlements that most Americans love so well? When will this or some future president hear the voice of the people?

(Cross-posted from New Economic Perspectives.)

Originally posted to Money and Public Purpose on Wed Jun 12, 2013 at 07:00 AM PDT.

Also republished by Pushing back at the Grand Bargain.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Lots of good analysis and information, not so sure (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sunspots

    about the platinum-coin approach.

    Dare we really start to work from the notion that the theft-by-austerity "debate" has been anything close to "reset? Far as I can see, the Obama people are all still on about forcing a Grand Bargain down our parched throats...

    "Is that all there is?" Peggy Lee.

    by jm214 on Wed Jun 12, 2013 at 08:39:35 AM PDT

    •  Yes, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Sunspots, psyched

      the post points out that the President still wants the  GB. And its point is that we need to be alert now.

      On the PCS approach. I outlined the advantages and disadvantages as I see them. The weight of things seems by far to be on the PCS side.

      What are your objections? Are they covered in my book?

      •  It's too simple, I guess, and the forces arrayed (0+ / 0-)

        against anything that would reduce the squeeze on the actual real-wealth creators are "legion," as they say. Too many of us are also invested, emotionally and intellectually, in other processes, having too much fun arguing arcanae or lobbing "libertarianisms" and the debate games and hufffiness offense-claiming and the rest. you are speaking, also, to a pretty small audience of possibly receptive folks, many of whom are predisposed, to try to find "common ground" and comity and compromise on the way to building coalitions and all that stuff, just because they are wired to be if not peacemakers, at least confrontation-avoiders (except where their personal-space "issues" are concerned.)

        "Is that all there is?" Peggy Lee.

        by jm214 on Wed Jun 12, 2013 at 10:50:45 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  It is very difficult (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jellyyork

          even for "possibly receptive folks" to get their heads around the fact that money is not physical stuff that the world can run out of. Even if one tries, the strong tendency is to return to the concretistic thinking about money that has been the norm for eons and of course lies behind the gold standard concept.

          And don't expect anyone in Washington to be thinking outside the monetary box.

          The "genius" of the sovereign coin idea is that it is legal and involves a physical coin, which is easier for people to relate to. It isn't as if Obama were to run to his Treasury Secretary and tell him to press some computer buttons and create numbers in some relevant accounts. That would not go over well, but the coin idea could.

          I tried to explain in my book on the nature of money (http://www.amazon.com/...) why it is difficult to comprehend the non-physicality of money and to expound upon the good that could be accomplished if the true nature of money were recognized and acted upon.

          Since both experts and non-experts have difficulty with this, we should not give up preaching the truth, but should keep talking until gradually it gains wide acceptance.
          .
          .


          For the first time in human history, we possess both the means for destroying all life on Earth or realizing a paradise on the planet--Michio Kaku.

          by psyched on Wed Jun 12, 2013 at 03:07:19 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Amen to the last. I'm still struggling with "Debt: (0+ / 0-)

            The First 5,000 Years." Any useful commonality between your thinking and Graeber's, or are we still in the realm of dueling models and everything keeps going on as before and getting worse?

            Money is funny. Funny "peculiar," not funny "ha-ha." I particularly like the neat trick of counterfeiting via the creation of "notional dollars" in all those counterparty derivative transactions. Current "value" as far as I can tell is what, $3 quadrillion Notional Dollars? All in wagers that neither party will have to make good on, since we fullfaithandcredit creators of actual real wealth get forced to pick up the tabs...

            "Is that all there is?" Peggy Lee.

            by jm214 on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 05:06:01 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I'm struggling too (0+ / 0-)

              with Graeber's book. I don't think there is anything incompatible between his very intellectual and detailed volume and my little book. It is amazing to look at the anthropological background of money and see how debt is reckoned differently in different societies and eras. It shows that money is what a society deems it to be and not an eternal truth like gravity.

              I feel we are on the cusp of a momentous change in the world's definition of money and debt. Money is what people think it is at any given time. We can change that thinking.
              .
              .


              For the first time in human history, we possess both the means for destroying all life on Earth or realizing a paradise on the planet--Michio Kaku.

              by psyched on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 01:00:53 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

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