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"I am not a little girl from a little town making good in a big town,
I'm a big girl from a big town making good in a little town." - Mae West
  • Edward Snowden is a fugitive on the move:
    A former contractor for the U.S. National Security Agency, charged by the United States with espionage, was allowed to leave Hong Kong on Sunday because a U.S. extradition request did not comply with the law, the Hong Kong government said.

    Edward Snowden left for Moscow on Sunday and his final destination may be Cuba, Ecuador, Iceland or Venezuela, according to various reports. The move is bound to infuriate Washington, wherever he ends up.

    Russia's Interfax news agency quoted a source at the Aeroflot airline as saying there was a ticket in Snowden's name for a Moscow-Cuba flight. Itar-Tass cited a source as saying Snowden would fly from Havana to the Venezuelan capital, Caracas.

  • Back in March, Reuters also noted the Administration proposed linking the NSA databases with those of America's financial corporations:
    The Federal Bureau of Investigation already has full access to the database. However, intelligence agencies, such as the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency, currently have to make case-by-case requests for information to FinCEN.

    The Treasury plan would give spy agencies the ability to analyze more raw financial data than they have ever had before, helping them look for patterns that could reveal attack plots or criminal schemes.

    If you think all the data about you held by private corporations belongs to you, think again. Its theirs. And they have no problem at all giving it to the government, or selling it to anyone else, with or without your consent. Because they don't need your consent to give or sell something that doesn't belong to you. Think about that.
  • In my view, this whole thing is not a privacy problem. The privacy was ceded a long time ago. Instead, it is a property rights problem. Your data, movements, profiles, pictures, etc., should belong to you. Personal data should be property just like your house or car. We need a new law that says so. The White House's consumer data privacy proposal is a start, but not even close to where we need to be. It might even be counter-productive considering how complex and unworkable it is.
  • Clueless GOP is still clueless on how to win a national election.
  • Conservatives say even if the Supreme Court rules in favor of marriage equality, they will ignore such a ruling. Is there any reason to even be nice to these people?
  • Will companies opt for the penalty instead of the coverage?
    Once new health insurance exchanges are up and running in October, companies with 50 or more full-time employees will face a choice: Provide affordable care to all full-time employees, or pay a penalty. But that penalty is only $2,000 a person, excluding the first 30 employees. With an employer’s contribution to family health coverage now averaging $11,429 a year, taking that penalty would seem to yield big savings.
  • Oh no...Hannah Montana is hanging out with black people! Bring the fainting couches!
  • Last week I had the pleasure of watching the irreplaceable (Brooklyn born and raised!) Mae West in I'm No Angel (1933) with Cary Grant and directed by Wesley Ruggles. Mae is at her sexy, hip-swinging, "come up and see sometime" best. In this movie she was 40 years old, but looks half that, and boy does she lay the wisecracks, double entendre, and witty one liners on thick. You'll enjoy this fun, charming story.

    Something you might not know about Mae West's moxie: When her building refused admittance to her black boyfriend, she just bought the building. She was far, far ahead of her time on both gay & transgender rights and interracial marriage.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Time to ask Robert Bork for an opinion on privacy. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, leonard145b

    Think of how much worse it could be.

    Or would there be any visible difference?

    Happy little moron, Lucky little man.
    I wish I was a moron, MY GOD, Perhaps I am!
    —Spike Milligan

    by polecat on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:03:18 PM PDT

  •  Last night's diary: (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, Diana in NoVa, PSzymeczek

    Transman running for City Council in NYC:  Mel Wymore for NYC City Council.

  •  Pet Food Recall (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, akmk, JeffW, msmacgyver, Deep Harm

    Please read this diary to keep our pets safe.

    It is a terrible thing to see and have no vision. ~ Helen Keller

    by Pam from Calif on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:05:17 PM PDT

  •  DK Quilt Guild Diary (10+ / 0-)

    DK Quilt Guild Diary will be available Sunday approx. 4pm (Pacific) 7pm (Eastern).  

    DK Quilt Guild: A place for quilters to gather, share ideas, projects, and to make the world a better place, one quilt at a time. Join us and share your thoughts, projects, questions, and tips. Quilters here are at many different levels of skill. Beginners and non-quilters are welcome, too.
    Chris Leach Quilt

    Quilt by Chris Leach

    It is a terrible thing to see and have no vision. ~ Helen Keller

    by Pam from Calif on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:06:06 PM PDT

  •  Fifty years later . . . (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, PSzymeczek

    a reflection after a high school reunion...

     in this post to which I invite your atteniont

    peace

    "We didn't set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people's hearts." - Pema Chodron

    by teacherken on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:06:11 PM PDT

  •  Snowden charm is wearing thin. He seems to be a (5+ / 0-)

    publicity hound. Will the next installment of "Where in the world is
    Edward Snowden?" be Venezuela, Cuba, Ireland? Stay tuned.

    "They will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the American economy. The full faith and credit of the United States of America is not a bargaining chip."

    by TofG on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:06:33 PM PDT

    •  Forget about Snowden (6+ / 0-)

      Focus on the issues that his disclosures reveal.  Can you?

      Daily Kos an oasis of truth. Truth that leads to action.

      by Shockwave on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:12:47 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  If, as your sig line suggests, (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        high uintas, doroma

        "Daily Kos is an oasis of truth..." then why do you want to shut up the discussion?   Shutting down the discussion is a form of censorship.  

        It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

        by Radiowalla on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:18:03 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Me shutting discussion? (3+ / 0-)

          I want to discuss what is important don't you?

          What do you think of the intelligence apparatus?  

          I think it is wasteful (the NSA spent $500 billion stopping 50 "terrorist"attacks, if you believe Alexander).

          I think it is a step towards totalitarianism.

          I think like the "heckler" at NN that it is insecure.

          I think the NSA and Alexander has been misleading Congress (and possibly Obama) for years.

          Let's discuss.

          Daily Kos an oasis of truth. Truth that leads to action.

          by Shockwave on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:23:27 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  You don't get to determine what is important (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            sebastianguy99, high uintas, doroma

            for everyone, much as that may disappoint you.  If someone wants to make a comment about Snowden, and apparently many here do, you don't have the right to tell them to forget about it and talk about what interests you.  

            Snowden's flight is breaking news and there is always interest in discussing breaking news.  

            It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

            by Radiowalla on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:30:29 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  This is a community of progressive bloggers (0+ / 0-)

              We are not hooked on CNN, Faux or MSNBC for that matter.  We come to discuss important things.  We are NOT a tool of DC or the Democratic party.  If anything we have to lead not be followers.  Do you want to lead or do you want to follow?

              Who determines what is important to you?

              Daily Kos an oasis of truth. Truth that leads to action.

              by Shockwave on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:34:12 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  Let's discuss Corporate data collection (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            sebastianguy99, Shockwave, PSzymeczek

            It pales in comparison to anything the NSA is doing and I think could be much more dangerous.

            •  Thank You! Can we please please talk about that? (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Radiowalla, doroma, PSzymeczek

              I still do not understand why the focus is solely on the NSA? The collection, sell, distribution, and private use of our personal information is far more dangerous.

              They are the ones who are tracking us.

              If you have ever had to give your zip code, you unwittingly gave up far more of your privacy than you should be comfortable with.

              The politicians may be bought, and the system corrupt, but it is our duty to fix these things.

              by sebastianguy99 on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 01:07:16 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Corporations having my personal information (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Shockwave, viral, Whatithink

                isn't nearly as dangerous to me as the government's being able to track where I go, what I do and what I say.  Corporations do not have agencies that can track me down, arrest me, and throw me in a dungeon somewhere.  Corporations can (and do) harass me with junk mail.

                "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

                by SueDe on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 01:27:25 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Where do you think the Gov gets their information? (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  sebastianguy99

                  Corporate data collection is a big source. My wife was virtually absent from any google searches. One purchase from Amazon changed that.

                  Plan on changing jobs? What if your prospective employer buys data about you?

                  Children planning to go to college? What if they know more than just what is on their Facebook page?

                  http://truth-out.org/...

                •  Well I have the right to believe otherwise for me. (0+ / 0-)

                  I believe the larger threat is from the private sector. They can keep me from employment, from owning a house or renting an apartment, and they can make it expensive for me to purchase goods and services among other things.

                  So yeah, ok junk mail.

                  The politicians may be bought, and the system corrupt, but it is our duty to fix these things.

                  by sebastianguy99 on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:50:10 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

              •  No corporation has a giant dump of all this data (0+ / 0-)

                Yes, corporate power should be challenged and kept in check, but power like the NSA with an IT budget that dwarfs any corporation is another thing.

                10 years from now under a different POTUS it can be used as a tool towards totalitarianism.

                Daily Kos an oasis of truth. Truth that leads to action.

                by Shockwave on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 01:33:08 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  The NSA is (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                sebastianguy99

                using corporations to collect their data.  That is what is disturbing to me.  The outsourcing of what were and should remain "Inherently governmental functions" (See Federal Acquisition Regulation Subpart 7.5).  Introducing a profit motive to these functions.

                You can't keep a mighty tree alive (much less expect it to thrive) by only spritzing the fine leaves at its tippy-top. The fate of the whole tree depends on nurturing the grassroots. - Jim Hightower

                by PSzymeczek on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:41:48 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  how are the issues separate? (0+ / 0-)

              The corporados already have to turn over any data that NSA wants.

            •  Exactly! (0+ / 0-)

              Though I really don't want either to have it.

              I agree with BBB completely, though.  If we want to take back our privacy, we have to lobby hard to get the laws into place that prohibit all of the companies (ISP, credit card co, etc, etc, etc) from sharing or selling that info.

              But geezus folks, you've been signing away your right to that data for decades and only now you're pissed?  Does anyone ever read the fine print?

        •  If one canreally focus on the issues, without (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          PSzymeczek

          prejudging. For example, I think both Ed Schultz and Stephanie Miller make a good case for their views of Snowden. I don't attack them personally and try to ridicule them, like I've seen some do on DailyKos, because they disagree with their views.

          "They will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the American economy. The full faith and credit of the United States of America is not a bargaining chip."

          by TofG on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:32:40 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  "Focus on the issues that his disclosures reveal" (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Shockwave, PSzymeczek

        1) With the "intelligence Community" having their fingers in the bowels of the internet since at least 2004; see Risen and Lichtblau;  they still came up short in boston......

        2) The "Intelligence Community" Facility in Utah will based on a experience in data center issues would be upwards of some $2 Billion Dollars to build and thus some $1.2 Billion per year to keep running all to end up short since the hard core terrierists don't use the internet.

        I want 1 less Tiny Coffin, Why Don't You? Support The President's Gun Violence Plan.

        by JML9999 on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:22:25 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  The diary asserts that... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Shockwave

        ..."Your data, movements, profiles, pictures, etc., should belong to you."  I am an avid supporter of President Obama but I agree.  I wonder, though, what folks think about medical records, which are kept but not seen by the people involved and are used by corporations with neither the knowledge nor the consent of those people?  What about the metadata available in 'black boxes' installed in many newer cars and trucks?  Such data can be used to impose penalties, even criminal ones, on vehicle owners and is not available to those owners.

        I agree that the security state in which we live is wrong.  I believe President Obama considers it wrong as well.  He has asked his supporters to 'push' him on issues of contention.  I don't think the methods used recently on several democratic-leaning sites by opponents of the lately revealed (or already known and dreaded) security apparatus are helpful or productive.  In a conflict between opposing points of view, giving aid and comfort to one's opponents usually hurts one's efforts.

    •  nope, just trying to find a safe place to be that (3+ / 0-)

      won't give him up. it's we who are fascinated by this. he'd be heading to other regions whether we knew about it or not.

      "Say little, do much" (Pirkei Avot 1:15)

      by hester on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:15:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Right you are. Snowden has done nothing to (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mahakali overdrive, Gooserock

        clog the airways with announcements, comments or recriminations.  The press is fascinated with the story of his moving to a safe asylum all by themselves.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:33:28 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I was unaware Snowden was in this to be charming (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shockwave, Dave925, milkbone, leu2500

      I thought this was about spying.

      I learn something new everyday.

    •  That doesn't sound as catchy as Carmen Sandiago (0+ / 0-)

      But then, if you catch her, you get a free trip. I don't know what the reward is for helping catch the deluded idiot with the Jason Bourne hard-on.

    •  Huh? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shockwave, SueDe

      I would respectfully submit that it is only those who call Snowden a traitor (you?) that are fixated on his movements.

      Just a note ... the lawyer now working with him is the same Spanish judge that went after Pinochet .. enough said.

      There's room at the top they're telling you still But first you must learn how to smile as you kill If you want to be like the folks on the hill

      by taonow on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:33:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Kind of ironic, since it was the CIA that... (0+ / 0-)

        ...put Pinochet in power;

        1973 Chilean coup d'état;

        After the coup, the junta established a military dictatorship with support from the CIA and DIA, that ruled Chile until 1990
        The CIA support actually proceeded the coup.  Buy me a beer and I'll tell you my story.

        IMO, the CIA has a war room today to go after Snowden.

        Daily Kos an oasis of truth. Truth that leads to action.

        by Shockwave on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:42:04 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  The same judge that arranged (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        msmacgyver

        Ecuadorian asylum for Assange, too.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 01:32:40 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I fervently hope (0+ / 0-)

      he spends a very long life.... in prison.

    •  What? Publicity hound? (0+ / 0-)

      If you did what he did, you would do anything to keep a high profile so the CIA wouldn't dare try to kidnap or assassinate you.

      Knowledge is Power. Ignorance is not bliss, it is suffering.

      by harris stein on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:47:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  well, if we are having a betting pool . . . (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, JML9999, xxdr zombiexx

    my assumption is that Snowden is heading to Ecuador, where Assange had also sought asylum.

  •  No, there isn't, but ... (6+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    xxdr zombiexx, Aunt Pat, TJ, Dave925, JeffW, Caelian
                            Is there any reason to even be nice to these people?
    President Obama and Harry Reid act as if there is.  What's that about?  My guess is if Obama and Reid treated the Repubs like they deserve to be treated, their popularity would soar.  

    The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

    by accumbens on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:10:51 PM PDT

    •  Politics seems built on a mountain of (7+ / 0-)

      falsehoods and fakery.

      Republicans conduct is so heinous I wonder about people who remain polite to them.

      Shit, their ENTIRE agenda is about FUCKING US.

      What do YOU do when people fuck with you? Smile and try to be bipartisan?

      Not me.

      I'd go Walking Dude on them.

      •  Yep, it's not that complicated. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        xxdr zombiexx, JeffW

        Somebody lies to and about you, is deceitful and insulting.  Do you let everyone know what they are doing and tell them to go fuck off or do you in the face of their continuing shit try to work with them?  It's not a trick question.

        The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

        by accumbens on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:33:14 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It's all politicians whether (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        accumbens

        republican or democrat out to screw us over. What do you think after 225 years of institutionalized corruption in the US that politics has come to? It's all about gamesmanship and getting over on someone. And don't think for a minute that Obama is not part and parcel of this institutionalized corruption. He is smack dab in the middle of and Hilary is right behind him.

        Knowledge is Power. Ignorance is not bliss, it is suffering.

        by harris stein on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:45:07 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  My new rallying cry (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, Radiowalla, sebastianguy99
  •  New Game....'Where In The World Is Ed Snowden?' (5+ / 0-)

    n/t

  •  You know what ELSE doesn't belong to us? (8+ / 0-)

    Our credit ratings, that's what!  Companies can refuse to hire us if we've had the lousy fortune to get laid off and lose our house to foreclosure, reel through a bankruptcy caused by medical bills, et cetera.  

    The REAL credit data doesn't show up on our so-called "free" credit reports.  Mine never says anything, so I don't even bother to order one my one "free" credit report per year from the tree viperish credit agencies.

    Someone with more clout than I should investigate these FICO ratings and call them out.  It's a disgrace that one misfortune can ruin the rest of our lives.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:15:12 PM PDT

    •  I have a friend who works in the mortgage (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Radiowalla

      business.  About once a year I buy his lunch and he brings my credit reports from the three reporting agencies.  You're absolutely correct that free credit reports don't give the full picture of what companies have reported that land on your report, when it was reported,  the details of the transactions, any final transaction dispositions, any bad reports that you have  disputed, the credit agency's judgment on those disputations  and the impact on your FICO score.

      The only hope of getting the full story from the agencies that will affect your life is to have a friend in an industry that has a contract with each reporting agency to order reports and who will be willing to request yours, like a mortgage company, apartment leasing company, car dealership, bank, etc.  Even then, the full reports are almost impossible to understand without help from someone who knows how to read them.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:51:01 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  New Data Branch of Government? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DRo, SueDe
    In my view, this whole thing is not a privacy problem. The privacy was ceded a long time ago. Instead, it is a property rights problem. Your data, movements, profiles, pictures, etc., should belong to you. Personal data should be property just like your house or car. We need a new law that says so. The White House's consumer data privacy proposal is a start, but not even close to where we need to be. It might even be counter-productive considering how complex and unworkable it is.
    How to make your data "belong to you" when you don't even know the entirety of what it is?

    At a minimum, any company that keeps data about you should deposit this data with the new Fourth Branch of Government, called the Data Branch.   There, if you are a citizen, you have exclusive access to this data.  This way, at least you have some idea of what corporations collect about you and what your aggregated data view looks like.

    The first purpose of this collected data is that at least you have some clue about what your data is.

    When there is a government need, just like with searches of physical property, a warrant needs to be issued.  The great savings here is that a lot of separate companies do not need to be served with warrants, just this central place.

    •  There is a new money making scam (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      viral

      Don't want mug shot online? Then pay up, sites say

      With a business model built on the strengths of technology, the weaknesses of human nature and the reach of the First Amendment, the sites are proving that in the Internet age, old assumptions about people's ability to put the past behind them no longer apply.

      The sites, some charging fees exceeding $1,000 to "unpublish" records of multiple arrests, have prompted lawsuits in Ohio and Pennsylvania by people whose mug shots they posted for a global audience. They have also sparked efforts by legislators in Georgia and Utah to pass laws making it easier to remove arrest photos from the sites without charge or otherwise curb the sites.

      But site operators and critics agree that efforts to rein them in treads on uncertain legal ground, made more complicated because some sites hide their ownership and location and purport to operate from outside the U.S.

      Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

      by DRo on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:26:18 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  If the FISA court would be responsible (0+ / 0-)

      for issuing the warrants, I don't see any protection of an individual's data at all.  I like the idea of doing something, though.  The only possibility I see right now is to become a die-hard luddite able to live entirely without credit.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:58:06 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  So Kos shouldn't be able to remove MY posting? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sebastianguy99

    I think the property rights issue is another over due topic that needs discussing.

    If I'm a corporation I can probably buy from Verizon, Google, Amazon... just about everything the NSA had to get a court order to get, and I don't have to jump through any of the hoops to try and keep it private.  I wouldn't doubt that China and Russia probably have front companies that do a lot of that.

    So should Kos be allowed to delete this posting that is MY original material? Or if I choose to use a site he created, does he own anything I put there?  Same for Verizon, Google...?

  •  Snowden's Hong Kong Phooey is what happends (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    taonow, Omir the Storyteller

    when you go up against Asian face savings and "make demands"

    I want 1 less Tiny Coffin, Why Don't You? Support The President's Gun Violence Plan.

    by JML9999 on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:25:04 PM PDT

  •  Edward Snowden will spend the night in (4+ / 0-)

    a hotel at Moscow's airport and proceed to Ecuador tomorrow, according to The Guardian's live update site.

    From the site:

    "Mr Edward Snowden, the American whistleblower who exposed evidence of a global surveillance regime conducted by US and UK intelligence agencies, has left Hong Kong legally. He is bound for the Republic of Ecuador via a safe route for the purposes of asylum, and is being escorted by diplomats and legal advisors from WikiLeaks.

    Mr Snowden requested that WikiLeaks use its legal expertise and experience to secure his safety. Once Mr Snowden arrives in Ecuador his request will be formally processed."

    According to Ecuador's foreign minister, his office has already received Snowden's request for asylum.

    "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

    by SueDe on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:27:28 PM PDT

  •  Case in point about public to private sector issue (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Icicle68, DRo, viral

    I read this article right before this came up here, and I think it illustrates part of the issue of what happens with a private sector, "legal" interception of public data... with rather ill results...

    http://www.theeagle.com/...

    It's a longer article and extremely interesting, IMHO, in that it really does get into the problem of how the private sector can easily and readily exploit publicly held knowledge. Unfortunately, I can only post a few excerpts:

    After more than seven years and a move 2,800 miles across the country, Christopher Jones thought he'd left behind reminders of the arrest that capped a bitter break-up. That was, until he searched the Internet last month and came face-to-face with his 2006 police mug shot.
    The information below the photo, one of millions posted on commercial website mugshots.com, did not mention that the apartment Jones was arrested for burglarizing was the one he'd recently moved out of, or that Florida prosecutors decided shortly afterward to drop the case. But, otherwise, the digital media artist's run-in with the law was there for anyone, anywhere, to see. And if he wanted to erase the evidence, says Jones, now a resident of Livermore, Calif., the site's operator told him it would cost $399.

    (repeat scenarios described where people charged with things that were later dropped are then posted to these sites... one guy finding himself on the cover of a sleazy tabloid of some sort after a really shaky and minor arrest that was dropped... others report inability to find work due to these sites)

    -cut-

    The sites, some charging fees exceeding $1,000 to "unpublish" records of multiple arrests, have prompted lawsuits in Ohio and Pennsylvania by people whose mug shots they posted for a global audience... it treads on uncertain legal ground, made more complicated because some sites hide their ownership and location and purport to operate from outside the U.S.

    -cut-

    Operators of some sites say they're performing a public service, even as they seek profit.

    -cut-

    "I can't find any public interest that's served if you are willing to take it (a mug shot) down if I give you $500. Then what public interest are you serving?," said Roger Bruce...

    cont...

    It's a good illustration of this sort of problem. And of course, as one can see, it's not really able to be reigned in by US law. So sleazy... just unbelievable. Can you imagine if you were dealing with this sort of a thing?

    Click the ♥ to join us on the Black Kos front porch to review news & views written from a black pov - everyone is welcome.

    by mahakali overdrive on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:28:17 PM PDT

  •  The Twinkies are coming! The Twinkies are coming! (5+ / 0-)

    Coming soon to a store near you.

    The company that went bankrupt after an acrimonious fight with its unionized workers last year is back up and running under new owners and a leaner structure. It says it plans to have Twinkies and other snack cakes back on shelves starting July 15.

    "Go well through life"-Me (As far as I know)

    by MTmofo on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:33:02 PM PDT

  •  Not just the $2,000, though that provides (0+ / 0-)

    plenty of incentive not provide health benefits.  Friday's economic rundown here on DK linked to sneaky way that employers can make benefits available to low-income workers that many will decline, resulting in no benefits and no penalty:

    http://www.nextnewdeal.net/...

    The $2,000 penalty remains either the most ill-considered or the most worker-hating and cynical aspect of the ACA.

    It'll take employers a little time to wrap their heads around it, but the inevitable result of combining low penalties with high subsidies is the employers will stop offering health benefits to employers at or below the national median wage.  It'll be cheaper just to offer higher salaries and let workers get nice subsidized coverage on the exchanges.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:38:19 PM PDT

  •  Film at eleven: (5+ / 0-)

    Masturbation is proof of life.

    The Great Awakening Is Afire! Think outside the box or remain mundane.

    by franklyn on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:38:32 PM PDT

  •  My email got hacked. Identical emails were sent (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    viral, JeffW

    to everyone in my address book. This happened to many people. Did NSA notice 300,000 emails all saying the same thing? Could they stop the hacker? No? So what's it good for?

  •  "Will companies opt for the penalty ... ?" (3+ / 0-)
    Will companies opt for the penalty instead of the coverage?
    Once new health insurance exchanges are up and running in October, companies with 50 or more full-time employees will face a choice: Provide affordable care to all full-time employees, or pay a penalty. But that penalty is only $2,000 a person, excluding the first 30 employees. With an employer’s contribution to family health coverage now averaging $11,429 a year, taking that penalty would seem to yield big savings.
    This question has always greatly puzzled me; that is, if it's implying that employees would somehow be worse off than before the ACA if this were the case...

    Currently, there is NO penalty for not offering coverage and yet many companies do offer it as a way to attract and keep good employees, among other reasons. Such companies already providing coverage are not likely to suddenly drop it and pay the penalty instead. Presumably the reasons they offered health insurance in the first place still exist.

    Companies who never did provide health insurance and are now required to do so or pay a penalty may very well choose the penalty. However, with the exchanges, and the income generated from said penalties possibly going toward health care (not sure on that point...), the employees are still better off than they were before.

    Perhaps, it is a simple question, with no such implication...

  •  Who still calls her Hannah Montana? n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Omir the Storyteller
  •  Whenever I think of Mae West (7+ / 0-)

    ...I think of Klondike Annie and this:

    Every man I meet wants to protect me. I can't figure out what from.
     - Mae West

    The problem with going with your gut as opposed to your head is that the former is so often full of shit. - Randy Chestnut

    by lotusmaglite on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:44:23 PM PDT

    •  I've always loved Mae. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PSzymeczek, fallina7

      Independent.  Smart.

      A woman ahead of her time.

    •  "See you later" (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PSzymeczek

      I love Mae West's line in Klondike Annie when ship captain Victor McLaglan is trying to put the make on her.  At one point he has to leave and says: "See you later".

      She says out of the corner of her mouth in that unique voice: "The later the better".

      I also love the bit at the beginning of She Done Him Wrong when she gives some money to a young mother begging in front of her club.  The young mother says: "You're a good woman, Lily".  Mae West replies: "Best woman ever walked the streets."

      As W.C. Fields said in My Darling Chickadee: "Easy on the ears, and a banquet to the eyes".

      (All quotes from fond memories.)

      Better to hide your tax returns and be thought a crook than to release them and remove all doubt. [Adapted from Abraham Lincoln]

      by Caelian on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:43:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  "I'm sorry Lily, it's Lent" (0+ / 0-)

      I've never seen this bit in a film, so I suspect it's from the scandalous stage version of what was filmed as She Done Him Wrong.  From memory:

      Lily (Mae West) is putting the vamp on a young Salvation Army officer, played by Cary Grant in the film.

      Lily: "Why'ncha c'mup and see me?  I'll tell you yer fortune."

      Officer: "I'm sorry Lily, it's Lent".

      Lily: "Well, when you get it back, c'mup and see me."

      Better to hide your tax returns and be thought a crook than to release them and remove all doubt. [Adapted from Abraham Lincoln]

      by Caelian on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:50:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Raining hard the last couple hours in NOLA. l (9+ / 0-)

    Now I'm getting worried. Somebody left a canoe in my street...

    I live under the bridge to the 21st Century.

    by Crashing Vor on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 12:55:03 PM PDT

  •  Obama issues statement on Snowden: (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    gfv6800, Caelian, leu2500, stevemb
    I believe we should look forward and not backward, therefore there will be no investigation of Snowden and his revelations about the actions of departments under the control of the Executive.
    Just kidding!

    Obama only wanted to "Look forward" and not "backward" when it came to the criminal activities of (his "opposition") the Republicans (walking hand-in-hand with the Democrats) which led the U.S. Empire to invade Iraq and destroy over 100+K lives.

    Waking Up Yet?

    The excuses for Obama's behavior have long since passed the point of predictability neccessary to qualify as an absurd production of Kabuki Theater.

    by Johnathan Ivan on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 02:14:30 PM PDT

  •  FWD.us, Elon Must is out (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Caelian

    Whatever GOP operative planned the hoodwinking of Zuckerberg and the other billionaires brilliantly ensured that their backing will, in future, be poison to mainstream Democratic party candidates.

    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    Now at least Elon Musk is out of FWD.US

    http://www.motherjones.com/...

    But the group caused a political firestorm recently when it ran TV advertisements praising Sen. Mark Begich (D-Alaska) for supporting more oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Reserve. Another ad depicted Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) criticizing Obamacare and President Obama's refusal (so far) to green-light the controversial Keystone XL pipeline.
    Musk said in a statement:
    I agreed to support Fwd.us because there is a genuine need to reform immigration. However, this should not be done at the expense of other important causes. I have spent a lot of time fighting far larger lobbying organizations in DC and believe that the right way to win on a cause is to argue the merits of that cause. This statement may surprise some people, but my experience is that most (not all) politicians and their staffs want to do the right thing and eventually do.

    "Your victory has demonstrated that no person anywhere in the world should not dare to dream of wanting to change the world for a better place." -- Mandela

    by agoldnyc on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 02:46:48 PM PDT

    •  ... after they've exhausted all other alteratives? (0+ / 0-)

      "You can always count on the Americans to do the right thing after they have exhausted all the other alternatives."

      Winston Churchill
      [There are several versions of this so I posted my favorite]

      Better to hide your tax returns and be thought a crook than to release them and remove all doubt. [Adapted from Abraham Lincoln]

      by Caelian on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:59:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I'm more by Miley Cyrus twerking (0+ / 0-)

    Girl ain't got the junk for it.

    http://callatimeout.blogspot.com/ Jesus Loves You.

    by DAISHI on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:07:09 PM PDT

  •  Not to get all CT (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    PSzymeczek

    but how often do Mercedes' BURST INTO FLAME? The FBI has investigated the car crash of journalist Michael Hastings, finding no evidence of foul play. They suggest the car crash may have been caused by a medical condition like, say, SPONTANEOUS HUMAN COMBUSTION. Or maybe a wandering bigfoot got careless with a cigarette butt.

    Mercedes: The New Pinto

    I'm never sure if I've forgotten and left the lid up, or if InvisObama™ is using the loo.

    by The Gryffin on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:10:55 PM PDT

  •  After 225 years of institutionalized corruption (0+ / 0-)

    in the US, a reversal of our lack of privacy rights is impossible. Obviously the founders when they drafted the constitution and Bill of Rights couldn't forsee the digital age. The fact that corporatists have used that as a way around the 4th Amendment says a lot about the lack of rights in the US today. You can bet that corporatists will fight tooth and nail to maintain their anonymity and privacy while they demand that all the rest of us willingly give up our property and privacy rights.

    Obama is a hypocrit and cannot be trusted to protect us in the digital age. Although I had voted for him twice, if I thought there was a decent alternative that would have protected my property and privacy rights I would have voted for the alternative.

    Going forward I will probably stop voting for president but continue voting progressive in local and state elections. In other words, if you think Obama is a jerk, Hilary can't be far behind.

    Being 62 years old and with maybe another 20-25 years left I am resigned to the fact that the more things change the more they stay the same. In other words things changed because an African-American was elected president and things might further change when a woman is elected president, but in terms of real change involving worker rights, family rights, health care, (the ACA was not real change as insurance companies were invited to make the rules, it was only slight change) discrimination, nothing will really change until we adopt a European style government system.

    After World War 2 the Europeans were able to start over from scratch. In a way the destruction of their society was a blessing in disguise. The same thing happened with the collapse of the soviet union.

    Knowledge is Power. Ignorance is not bliss, it is suffering.

    by harris stein on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:29:22 PM PDT

  •  employees w/o insurance (0+ / 0-)

    as a deductible expense, assuming your company is
    profitable the tax advantage is 30% of the amuont
    plus the 2,000 penalty, plus there is a big productivity
    gain to having healthy workers.

    one worker showing up with the flu and making everyone
    sick, is a big cost.

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