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As has been reported, as of today, the proper name to use when referring to the leaker of the Cablegate cables and the Collateral Murder video is Chelsea Manning.  The proper pronoun to use is "she".  Let's respect her decision.

Sadly, not everyone will.

More below the fold.

First, her official statement:

Subject: The Next Stage of My Life

I want to thank everybody who has supported me over the last three years. Throughout this long ordeal, your letters of support and encouragement have helped keep me strong. I am forever indebted to those who wrote to me, made a donation to my defense fund, or came to watch a portion of the trial. I would especially like to thank Courage to Resist and the Bradley Manning Support Network for their tireless efforts in raising awareness for my case and providing for my legal representation.

As I transition into this next phase of my life, I want everyone to know the real me. I am Chelsea Manning. I am a female. Given the way that I feel, and have felt since childhood, I want to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible. I hope that you will support me in this transition. I also request that, starting today, you refer to me by my new name and use the feminine pronoun (except in official mail to the confinement facility). I look forward to receiving letters from supporters and having the opportunity to write back.

Thank you,

Chelsea E. Manning

So was Chelsea's statement today.  Just as quick came the official response of the United States Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth:
"The Army does not provide hormone therapy or sex-reassignment surgery for gender identity disorder.” Citing a policy of non-discrimination based on race, rank, ethnicity or sexual orientation – but not gender identity – the the USDB statement said that, “All inmates are considered soldiers and are treated as such with access to mental health professionals, including a psychiatrist, psychologist, social workers and behavioral science noncommissioned officers with experience in addressing the needs of military personnel in pre- and post-trial confinement.”
From the horse's mouth - it's not okay to discrimate... except against trans people.  It's okay to discriminate against them.  So no treatment for her except to talk to people.  Never mind that 30-40% of trans people attempt suicide at some point in their life.  

No treatment.  No dignity.  

At least we can show her respect.

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Comment Preferences

  •  On the other hand, (5+ / 0-)

    there are a lot of liberals who've previously denounced her as a traitor now expressing support.

    That tells you something about American liberalism in 2013, and it ain't flattering.

  •  Does the US prison system or the privatized (2+ / 0-)

    prison system offer even this kind of mental health service?

    And here's a thought about incarceration, punishment, and that sort of thing:

    If transition is liberating, how punitive is the denial of the transition until release from incarceration, even when presented with the psychiatric help to cope until then?

    Is that an Eighth Amendment case?

    Couched in Fourteenth or Fifth Amendment language of protected classes?

    Cause Manning probably won't be released until the VERY earliest sometime in 2017.  If the President grants clemency--he won't grant a pardon--it won't happen until the day he leaves office.

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

    by zenbassoon on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 08:02:12 AM PDT

    •  Yeah, I'm thinking there's the beginnings of a (4+ / 0-)

      cruel and unusual punishment case here.  Especially if they not only refuse to fund it, but flatly refuse to allow it.  

      Já þýðir já. Nei þýðir nei. Hvað er svona erfitt við það?

      by Rei on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 08:09:06 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I actually looked up (6+ / 0-)

      just plain old basic insurance policies re: transgender folks and found it disturbing that a) many are refused a basic policy if they are transgender; and b) no insurance carrier covers the therapies and procedures related to transition.  Here's a link to the Transgender Law Center.

      Disturbing on all levels and not sure if Obamacare will affect those blatantly discriminatory exclusions.

      I'm not excusing the military by any means -- but I certainly didn't believe they'd be on the cutting edge of medical care beyond psychological.  

      " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

      by gchaucer2 on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 08:24:02 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  And the funny thing is... (6+ / 0-)

        Insurance companies excuse it saying "It's cosmetic, not medical".  But the medical community makes transpeople get all sorts of paperwork and approval, long-term psychoanalysis and the like and treatment from physicians, saying "It's medical, not cosmetic".

        In short, transpeople are subjected to two mutually exclusive attitudes that in each case work to their financial detriment.

        Já þýðir já. Nei þýðir nei. Hvað er svona erfitt við það?

        by Rei on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 08:33:41 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  My understanding is that the lack of access is (0+ / 0-)

        on a prior medical condition - that'll definitely go away.  As to covering the cost of transition, I won't pontificate either way, although my gut feeling is that there is likely no language in the bill due to the lightning rod that it could have been - most likely left up to individual insurers to decide.

        "The first drawback of anger is that it destroys your inner peace; the second is that it distorts your view of reality. If you come to understand that anger is really unhelpful, you can begin to distance yourself from anger." - The Dalai Lama

        by auron renouille on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 01:42:11 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Transpeople are not a protected class, so (0+ / 0-)

      I'm not sure the 5th amendment gets you anywhere on that.  The 8th is the most applicable, as you cannot deny necessary medical treatment for the purpose of inflicting punishment.  Of course that presupposes a consensus that hormone therapy is necessarily medical treatment.

  •  Not everyone will. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    blw, JackND

    I assume that the military will continue to refer to Private Manning by the name that appears on the soldier's birth certificate and enlistment papers, until such time as those are legally changed.  I can understand why.  I would not ascribe the practice to bias or prejudice.  The military being what it is, a soldier cannot simply demand that he or she be referred to by a certain name of his or her choosing after enlistment.  Otherwise, someone who wants to be difficult could change his or her preferred name every other day.

    •  We're of course not talking about a paperwork (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      antimony, Mikey, jayden, jessical, atana

      issue.  We're talking about the fact that the military is refusing medical treatment and openly saying that discrimination is okay against transpeople.  That should be simply unacceptable to anyone who calls themself a liberal.

      Já þýðir já. Nei þýðir nei. Hvað er svona erfitt við það?

      by Rei on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 08:18:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  qsdf (0+ / 0-)
      Otherwise, someone who wants to be difficult could change his or her preferred name every other day.
      Ah yes, this completely fictional thing that no human being except a crazy person would do is a valid excuse for the transphobic practice of not referring to a person with the name they want to be referred to as.
  •  The actual statement (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    misslegalbeagle
    "Inmates at the United States Disciplinary Barracks and Joint Regional Correctional Facility are treated equally regardless of race, rank, ethnicity or sexual orientation. All inmates are considered soldiers and are treated as such with access to mental health professionals, including a psychiatrist, psychologist, social workers and behavioral science noncommissioned officers with experience in addressing the needs of military personnel in pre- and post-trial confinement.

    "The Army does not provide hormone therapy or sex-reassignment surgery for gender identity disorder. The USDB has implemented risk assessment protocols and safety procedures to address high risk factors identified with the Prison Rape Elimination Act."

    The Guardian inserted the bit that you bolded above. The statement doesn't specifically exclude transpeople.

    As far as paying for hormone therapy and SRS, it is rare for insurance to cover these expenses. That is slowly changing, but it would be surprisingly progressive of the Army to be ahead of the curve.

    Disclaimer: If the above comment can possibly be construed as snark, it probably is.

    by grubber on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 08:57:50 AM PDT

    •  According to AJA.. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cassandra Waites, JackND, Rei

      she's not going to get her therapy.

      ... transgendered people really are the next gay rights movement. As progressive as I am, even I'm still a little hesitant to use the female pronoun. That needs to change - culturally and legally.

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