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Carl Davidson at In These Times a writes wait-just-a-dang-minute-here piece with regards to—Flipping the House:

With Congressional elections in 2014, it’s time we get serious about electoral politics. Strategic decisions must be made, resources assembled, alliances forged and forces deployed in the most critical terrains.

No progressive measures will see the light of day until the right-wing cabal in Congress is crushed at the polls. This is not to say it will be easy or that all Democrats are sweetness and light. People are not energized by “neoliberalism lite.” But we have to start somewhere in getting the spanner out of the works and the boots of the super-rich off our necks. To defeat as many Republicans as we can in the next round is a fine place to begin.

The first difficulties to overcome will be internal. The Democratic Party is not a unified force. In Congress, they divide into major clusters, from the Progressive Democrats of America (PDA) and Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) on the left, then proceeding rightward through the Old New Dealers backed by the AFL-CIO and Campaign for America’s Future, to the Clintonite New Democrats, to the shrinking Blue Dogs.

But the fault line here is between the Democratic advocates of global and finance capital, and everyone else. This is nowhere clearer than in Chicago, where Mayor Rahm Emanuel is part of the problem, not the solution.

The Editorial Board of the Los Angeles Times states—Congress should give negotiations on Tehran's nuclear program more time to bear fruit:
With exquisitely bad timing, a group of House members is urging the Senate to approve new sanctions against Iran in the middle of negotiations on a deal in which the Islamic Republic would suspend its nuclear program. [...]

The House members argue that because existing sanctions brought Iran to the negotiating table, "the threat of enhanced sanctions holds the promise of compelling Iran to give up its ambitions." But that threat will exist whether this legislation is enacted or not. The question is whether rushing to institute new sanctions at this time would undermine the delicate negotiations between Iran and the so-called P5-plus-1 — the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council and Germany.

Michael Hirsch at The Atlantic claims that Elizabeth Warren is Not Ready for Prime Time as the Democrats' 2016 presidential candidate:
Gutsy, smart, and hyper-articulate, Elizabeth Warren is quickly becoming the voice of progressivism in Washington. Along with departing regulator Gary Gensler, Warren probably did more than anyone in Washington to bulk up Dodd-Frank from its rather flimsy beginnings and turn it into a financial-reform law with some weight. She also speaks out eloquently for the beleaguered middle class and on the deeper problem of income inequality.

But the idea that somehow this growing reputation translates into a competitive bid for the 2016 presidential nomination—The New Republic recently suggested on its cover that Warren represents the "soul" of the Democratic Party more than Hillary Clinton—is pretty over the top.

More pundits can be found below the fold

John Judis at The New Republic fumes—If You Believe in Government, You Should Be Furious About Obamacare's Incompetent Rollout—A fiasco that could haunt progressives for years to come:

Tennis players make a distinction between forced and unforced errors. President Obama’s failure to provide sufficient funds in 2009 to boost employment was a forced error – it’s unlikely he could have gotten a trillion-plus spending bill through Congress. But Obama’s failure to make good on the promise of the Affordable Care Act is an unforced error – and the public is unlikely to forgive or forget it.
Eric Alterman at the Center for American ProgressA Bully Pulpit for Billionaires:
The magazine’s editors appear to believe that Michael Bloomberg was a virtually flawless mayor. To The Economist—whether in its opinion or news pages, a candidate who ran in opposition to Bloomberg’s legacy must be wrong in pretty much everything he promises or proposes, despite de Blasio’s incredible margin of victory. This bias remains unchanged, regardless of whether the available evidence supports it.

Together, both pieces of the magazine’s feature take up 2,500 words. There is nary a column inch that offers a criticism of Bloomberg’s 12-year tenure as mayor or examines why voters might prefer anyone different. Has inequality exploded in New York in recent years? Yes, says The Economist—and that’s a good thing. “New York needs its plutocrats. The top 1% of its taxpayers fork out a whopping 43% of the income taxes; if they leave, public services will suffer.”

True, they would, but there is almost no reliable research to support the notion that they will leave.

The Editorial Board of Haaretz urges that the government—Stop the discriminatory East Jerusalem park plan:
Ultimately, this is a simple story. The state insists on establishing a grandiose park of dubious archaeological importance in the only area that can allow people living together in a densely crowded area a more reasonable life. But those people are not Jews, and that is enough for the state to see no reason to take their welfare and quality of life into consideration.

The plan was indeed approved last week by the regional committee, but the “national park to dry up the neighborhoods of Isawiyah and A-Tur” is a project dictated from above - from the government, and particularly its leader. That is why Netanyahu is the one who must stop this injustice, and prevent the establishment of a park that will grow entirely from the seeds of discrimination.

A.B. Stoddard at The Hill writes—It may be all over for Obama:
President Obama's proposed policy "fix" may ultimately fix little in the mess the Affordable Care Act has created, but his concessions Thursday nonetheless made history. In an unprecedented admission, Obama not only owned up to failure — something he has never done — but he admitted to misleading congressional Democrats who are now being blamed for telling their constituents they could keep insurance plans they liked. [...]

There's a lot "on" Obama now as Democrats scramble to distance themselves from his false promise, the failed website and the president himself in the wake of ObamaCare's frightful start. As a lame-duck president with approval ratings down in the danger zone and little prospect for a second-term agenda, Obama will soon find that unless the ACA's enrollment and popularity increase dramatically, he is all alone.

Jim Hightower at The Progressive writes—The Pope Shows Us How To Deal with Wall Street:
Many congress critters like to rise up on their hind legs and bellow that they're "tough on crime."

But they all seem to suffer from a genetic defect known as "Upper-Class Crime Exceptionitis." One symptom of UCCE is that lawmakers who take a hard line against common bank robbers, suddenly go flaccidly soft when it’s the bankers doing the robbing. We're presently witnessing an epidemic of UCCE in Washington's coddling of Wall Street's fraud-meisters. Hardly a month goes by without one or more of these royal bankers conceding that they've been systematically stealing people's homes, defrauding their own customers, doing illegal trades, laundering drug money, and so forth. [...]

So, does no one have a cure for this gross injustice? Well, there is one person our legislators might consult: Pope Francis! He's been in office for only six months, but he's already launched a clean-up of the corrupt Vatican bank and has proclaimed by word and deed that the moral standard for church officials—from bishops to bankers—is to be: Humility, modest living, and service (especially to the poor).

Paul Krugman at The New York Times explains in A Permanent Slump? how a man whose actions are among the key reasons we're in the acute economic crisis we are in (as well as why we are in a chronic one) is now saying there may be no way out of the mess he helped create at no damage to his own wallet:
But what if the world we’ve been living in for the past five years is the new normal? What if depression-like conditions are on track to persist, not for another year or two, but for decades?

You might imagine that speculations along these lines are the province of a radical fringe. And they are indeed radical; but fringe, not so much. A number of economists have been flirting with such thoughts for a while. And now they’ve moved into the mainstream. In fact, the case for “secular stagnation” — a persistent state in which a depressed economy is the norm, with episodes of full employment few and far between — was made forcefully recently at the most ultrarespectable of venues, the I.M.F.’s big annual research conference. And the person making that case was none other than Larry Summers. Yes, that Larry Summers. [...]

Mr. Summers began with a point that should be obvious but is often missed: The financial crisis that started the Great Recession is now far behind us. Indeed, by most measures it ended more than four years ago. Yet our economy remains depressed.

The Washington Post Editorial Board cheers because Ethanol takes policy blow from the Environmental Protection Agency:
ONCE TOUTED as a climate-friendly renewable alternative to foreign oil, the corn-based liquid ethanol has been exposed as an environmental and economic mistake. Lured by federal subsidies, Midwestern farmers have devoted millions of acres to corn that might otherwise have been devoted to soil conservation or feed-grain production.

Meanwhile, a “dead zone” fed by fertilizer runoff spreads at the mouth of the Mississippi and production costs throughout the grain-dependent U.S. food industry rise. At the end of 2011, the ethanol industry lost a $6 billion per year tax-credit subsidy. And on Friday the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) delivered yet another policy defeat for ethanol – which is to say, a victory for common sense.

We refer to the EPA’s proposed cut in the amount of ethanol that the nation’s refiners must add to the fuel supply in 2014, from 18.15 billion gallons of ethanol called for in current law to a new target of 15 billion to 15.52 billion gallons.

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Comment Preferences

  •  NYTimes reminds everyone that (44+ / 0-)

    America's health care system sucks.

    The report found that by virtually all measures of cost, access to care and ease of dealing with insurance problems, Americans fared poorly compared with people in other advanced countries. The survey covered 20,000 adults in the United States and 10 other industrial nations — Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland and Britain, all of which put in place universal or near-universal health coverage decades ago. The United States spends far more than any of these countries on a per capita basis and as a percent of the national economy. For that, it gets meager results.
    •  We need to stop conflating... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wonmug

      ...how we deliver health care with how we pay for it.

      Single Payer would be great, but it won't get us out of the woods. We need to find ways to stop spending 1/6 of our entire economy on health care! Regardless of who pays for it.

      As Matt Miller and others have pointed out, Singapore spends 4% of GDP and gets excellent results. Other countries spend more, but nowhere near what we do.

      As we're seeing with Obamacare, change is hard. Miller constantly points out that every dollar of "waste" is someone's dollar of income. And there are a whole lot of dollars up for grabs.

      Harvard innovation guru Clayton Christensen wrote a book on ways to rein in costs. Recommended for policy wonks: "The Innovator's Prescription".

      What is valued is practiced. What is not valued is not practiced. -- Plato

      by RobLewis on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 08:17:21 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The Carl Davidson piece is outstanding (27+ / 0-)

    and I especially liked the "boots of the super rich off our necks".

    here's a bit more:

    Victory at the polls will come from below, from communities of color, from unions and from a broad majority of women and youth. Given the GOP’s “War on Women,” its efforts to crush young people with student debt, and its opposition to jobs programs and a higher minimum wage, these constituencies are ripe for organization. Yes, these factors existed in 2012, but their anger has only been intensified by the Right’s escalation of its offensive.
    and he closes with spot on advice:
    The platform is on the table. The CPC’s Back to Work Budget and the Green Party’s Green New Deal. The Afghan war can be ended. Student debt can be swapped for public service. State banks can replace the “too big to fail” banksters, and the Robin Hood Tax can recover the wealth needed to fund it all. We know what needs to be done, and there is a popular base to support it. What we need now is political will, unity and commitment.
     (emphasis mine)

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 04:37:36 AM PST

    •  But? (9+ / 0-)

      Will the Democrats do something stereotypical like never mising a opportunity to miss an opportunity by going more Third Way or ignoring the Youth and Women?

      I'm still sore about the '80s with the blown opportunities to outreach from farmers in crisis to alienated Alt Rockers.

      "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

      by Stude Dude on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 04:59:48 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Flip the question. (7+ / 0-)

        Will the youth, women, people of color, gays, liberals, progressives and all the other democrats with a stake in not being yanked around by this thing called the TP/GOP, the religious zealots, 1%, bigots and just plain ignorant in many cases turn out in the general to vote for the best they can get then?

        I am not talking about primaries. I am talking about the election when all the efforts to get our best have perhaps just gotten someone that will, even occasionally, stand up to the other side where it counts in office. Someone that by affiliation alone denies the other side "majority" control as we see in the current House and many state legislatures.

        We laugh at those in the deep red states that "vote against their interests" while too damn many on our side can't be bothered to turn out to at least protect theirs!

        In a number of states and the U.S. House we probably would not be whining about gerrymandering and voter suppression if that Obama electorate had done its job in 2010. We and in my view the nation can't afford any more of the two steps forward, one-and-a-half back due to on and off again turn out and neglect in off year and local elections.

        The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

        by pelagicray on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 06:29:52 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  The "Street Activists" have to be aligned (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          a2nite, Stude Dude

          I contend that is (in part) what "happened" to us in 2010.

          Let me make this clear: WE voted.

          And then many of us went home and sulked.

          We did not put forth enough effort to cajole our "casual" voters to the polls because we didn't want to be shamed by them on our initial contact with them to get them activated. We projected our shame - of broken promises, compromised legislation, less progress, etc. - onto them in many cases, and mostly they got the message that the cycle was "no big deal." Those people depend on us to put the importance of an election "on their radar." They have enough to do with juggling the immediacy of life, especially those who are near, at and below poverty. Mind you they still have choice on whether to heed our alerts or not, but in the main they weren't given the opportunity to do so.

          Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. --Martin Luther King Jr.

          by Egalitare on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 06:50:30 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  There are lots of issues "we" have to address. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            rwgate, Stude Dude

            Some are generational and technical. Party organizations are late to oblivious to cultural changes that have an effect. Our relative lack of forums vs. the megachurch is one in an increasingly disassociated society. When "our voters" may sit in a bar "chatting" by text and not have a land line at all the old GOTV methods do not work. Methods the Obama campaign adopted in 2008 need to be adopted and kept fresh as a party responsibility. The last two paragraphs of this comment last week touch on that problem.

            What I find particularly infuriating though are people, some right on this site, that think voting their interests is something that has to be cajoled, like kids offered candy, when faced with a real threat. Today's TP/GOP is a threat and is enabled by a near religious (sometimes not "near" at all!) fanaticism to hold onto enough power levers to at least block any progress we hold as our interests. Under present political conditions I see that as being a bit like kids standing idly by as a friend is offered candy from a stranger in a car because they are not getting a better offer from a cop.

            First we, as individuals, need to try to educate those we do associate with on the importance of voting even when the choice is nothing but really bad/a bit better in general elections at the local (where it really counts) and national level. We need to stop the whining that we have no choices among people that may take that to heart as a reason to not vote and at the same time, again particularly at local level, vote in primaries to get better.

            When I see anyone, of whatever interest group, here doing the whining that Democrats are just kicking them I can't help but visualizing them getting impaled by the bamboo stake the TP/GOP is going to shove where the light don't shine. I've spent too much of my life living with elected officials acting totally against my interest and sometimes threatening my livelihood and even liberty to have any sympathy.

            The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

            by pelagicray on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 07:20:03 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  People didn't have a reason to vote; we didn't (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Stude Dude

          Give them one in 2010.

          Plus the evil Rs lied & stupid angry mostly white people voted for them then got screwed.

          nosotros no somos estúpidos

          by a2nite on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 06:59:58 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  You gotta be begged, just begged to turn out and (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            rwgate, Stude Dude

            protect your interests? Oh me, oh my, you did not give me candy so I'll sit here on the sidelines to get shafted by him. Your "stupid angry mostly white people" will always be around in some form or another to fall for lies. That is what "evil" and self interested politicians do! They have done it all through history. It is up to us to make sure they don't put the evil in by at least turning out to block them even if the block is not too damn sweet itself.

            See above for the patience I have with "gotta be lured into voting" crap!

            The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

            by pelagicray on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 07:28:27 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I vote; my family votes; most of my friends vote, (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Stude Dude, Egalitare

              But that is our tradition.

              Some people haven't learned nor have made the connection between voting & legislation. Some people have only been able to vote since the sixties. Ranting at people we want to vote is going to get you nothing.

              Why shouldn't we ask for & get something? The evil rich people get more money; the woman haters get TV ultrasound; the gun nuts get "SYG"; the racists get to restrict voting; the stupid got TBAGS elected to do nothing.

              But then their message of the good old days were better because most non-white non-males knew their place & white men could do whatever they wanted.

              That isn't our message, the message of exclusion.

              nosotros no somos estúpidos

              by a2nite on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 09:37:38 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Most Democratic voters don't understand (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Egalitare, a2nite, pelagicray

                how important it is to vote in decennial (census) years whether those are presidential election years or not, because they don't realize that redistricting happens in the states based on who and what party is elected to the majority in those years.  And unfortunately, Democrats don't make the point forcefully enough in those years.

                Republicans made a huge push in the 2010 election based on redistricting, going so far as lecturing those who showed up at town halls, neighborhood and community meetings and speeches to local organizations that they could assure Republican control of the process and how important that was, if the voters made it a priority to get to the polls that November.  

                Democrats didn't do any such thing, although their voters needed to hear it and understand it.

                "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

                by SueDe on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 11:08:13 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Right, we just had an off off year election in NE (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  SueDe

                  OH.

                  I voted especially since my friend was running for City council. I pounded pavement for him.

                  People on our side need a reason to vote unless they know that the RW Rs are going to screw us out of our right to vote or out of BC for women. We don't vote because we hate someone, unlike the evil RW TGOP voters.

                  nosotros no somos estúpidos

                  by a2nite on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 02:46:58 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                •  It seems I remember quite a bit on the subject. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  SueDe

                  I know I got flooded with e-mail with much made of the importance of securing state legislative seats for just that reason. May not have been enough, but there was no silence on the subject from where I sit. Then I sit in an area with a fairly active and vocal Democratic organization.

                  You are correct though that most voters don't seem to understand. Then I'm finding registered voters (who don't actually vote much) with advanced degrees that don't seem to understand civics 100 or how their state provides for constitutional amendments or even goes from a bill to law.

                  The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

                  by pelagicray on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 08:13:52 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Typical, but unnerving for the rest of us. (0+ / 0-)

                    We just need to be patient and understanding in order to explain the importance of their vote to individuals and groups we're involved with.

                    "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

                    by SueDe on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 10:42:02 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

              •  I do not think it is "some people" that have not (0+ / 0-)

                learned about the link between voting and not only legislation but some realities of life. It seems to be quite a bit larger that "some" describes. Look at the bottom quote here.

                Part may be the fact that we as a nation have led a fairly rich life—and for many a peaceful life. I find some of the least interested among the children and grandchildren of people who fought through the Great Depression and following war. Somehow they failed, I believe at a gut level, to pass on the struggle for economic justice, the New Deal and then what was a war of survival.

                I've run into so many with the "no point in voting" among those that grew up in relative wealth and peace. I am old enough to be seeing some of that creep in to young African Americans, professionals, well off and far from a time and place where they would be "non human" and unable to vote. I can better understand the ghetto kid, one never really knowing hope, who does not consider voting, but the educated son or granddaughter of someone on the lines during the civil rights era?

                The absence of our core and those just generally with us in local elections is depressing. I've talked with some and found they never seemed to consider that it may be in that local election where a sheriff or judge or prosecutor is either someone they need to fear or someone that can be trusted to truly respect justice.

                Somehow we have to work on education and convincing where we can. We need their vote, not just the politicians. As I said somewhere else today, I've spent too much of my life living with the bad consequences of failure of "good" voters to do something as simple as showing up to vote against a corrupt local candidate.

                The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

                by pelagicray on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 07:46:28 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  Then you'd have us doomed to long term... (0+ / 0-)

              ...electoral impotence.

              Do you really think every TP/GOP voter is "sufficiently educated" about voting and simply check the calender to vote? The GOP coalition peels off a good number of people who should be "our" voters, but they get side tracked by (using your term) candy.

              Prime example: guns. I used to be a Steelworker in a Right to Work for Less state: Virginia. No less than 33% of our members would vote for the GOP candidate in any election simply because of the gun factor. In effect, they valued the theoretical Right to Keep and Bear Arms more than their practical, "kitchen table" capacity to earn enough money to purchase arms of their choice. This is not limited to Union members in the Old South and the Southern Plains. Similar numbers crop up in PA, OH and other for now relatively "Union stronger" states.

              Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. --Martin Luther King Jr.

              by Egalitare on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 12:41:50 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Huh? How would convincing a substantial block of (0+ / 0-)

                voters that turn out to vote "blue" in presidential years that sitting out off years—even if no "blue candy" is catching their eyes—is both foolish and fatal to their interests doom us to "electoral impotence"?

                Your union member that salivates on "guns" alone is by no means unique. I am not sure we can work on them, there is in my opinion some sort of screw loose just as much as the normally sane person that somehow goes nuts because a mosque is planned down the road. There will always be people, even those seemingly "on our side" in significant ways that will be distracted by some "candy" to vote against their core interests. We saw some of that in Virginia this year. Apparently Cuccinelli made a last minute pitch among a segment strongly opposed (for some good reasons) to a new highway development and from comments of some that became their single issue in favor of a man they disliked in every other way.

                Where we can work, need to educate, is in that block of voters that just do not turn out in the off years and local elections. With an absolute nutter, one extremely distasteful to Fairfax County "blues" in a county going pretty blue, 53.2%, 353,882 voters, failed to show up on election day. Let's assume a conservative 50-50 red/blue split there in general outlook. That means 176,941 voters could not be bothered to show up when there was a clear and present danger ranging from women's rights, science, gay rights and no few other issues.

                No progressive measures will see the light of day until the right-wing cabal in Congress is crushed at the polls.
                Until that job is done we have to somehow get the idea across that individuals opposed to that cabal's agenda have to turn out every election to do the crushing.

                The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

                by pelagicray on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 08:06:22 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

      •  Dems can't ignore women. (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        a2nite, Onomastic, JaxDem, Stude Dude, SueDe

        I thought this would happen in 2010, but it should happen in 2014, and will be all but inevitable in 2016.
        There will come a time when women really put their foot down, and it will really change electoral calculus.
        It will be more about main street, more about kitchen table issues, more about youth (even if the college kids still don't get out and vote),  more about health care, jobs, and more teachers/fewer prisons.

        The reason that "farmaid" and "rock the vote" failed to do much is because they failed to connect other peoples' problems to the problems of individual voters (rock the vote was especially pathetic).

        You have to effectively demonstrate the interconnectedness of different subsets of the society and bring it all home to the kitchen table.

        Male culture is still more steeped (drenched, actually) in the dubious brew of "rugged individualism" and we've seen this exploited in recent elections, to the gop's advantage. They've effectively defined the future as a choice between "free enterprise" and "socialism", self-reliance v nanny state, male dominated capitalist status quo v ant-colony communism, guns v feminine victimhood (esp. of black men), us v them, mine v yours, etc., on and on.
        There's another way of looking at things in which we perceive benefits for ourselves accruing along with the benefits of my neighbors, or "those people" across town, or across the ocean. It's easier for women to conceptualize this idea. That's just an anthropological fact, I think.

        You can't make this stuff up.

        by David54 on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 06:49:39 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  National Republican committees have hired (0+ / 0-)

          a women's advertising agency to create a campaign for 2014 aimed directly at women and featuring women's issues, which they define not as abortion and birth control but economics and education.  How they're going to square that definition with the national Republican platform, which calls for the destruction of the Dept. of Education and an economic policy that features taking funding away from programs that most impact women and children, I don't know.  But it should be interesting watching them try.

          "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

          by SueDe on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 11:39:49 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I saw a bit of Andrea Mitchell today when she had (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            SueDe

            the deputy chair of the Romney campaign to talk about it. Apparently she's their lead spokesperson on the issue.

            The lady mainly was talking about how the Dems were successful in mis-characterizing Romney's policies relative to women.

            You can't make this stuff up.

            by David54 on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 04:15:34 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Andrea Mitchell is pretty good at (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              David54

              bringing Republican operatives on her program to explain what they're planning to do to attract groups that they've managed to piss off over the past few years.  Democrats all should watch her program so they understand what the Republicans are doing and can make plans to counter them.

              "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

              by SueDe on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 10:36:51 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

    •  Will it resonate though? nt (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, JaxDem

      "I think it's the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately." -- George Carlin, Satirical Comic,(1937-2008)

      by Wynter on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:04:15 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Unfortunately, looking at the comments, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JaxDem, offgrid

      we're lined up for a replay.

      Another implication of the fault line is that each side learns a different lesson: the Third War supporters blame the Left and the voters, the Left blames the Third Way for its policies and actions in office...

      Trust, but verify. - Reagan
      Vote, but Occupy. - commonmass
      The 3rd Way has squandered our Resistance for a pocket full of mumbles, Such are promises All lies and jests; still a kossack's about the horse race And disregards the effects...

      by Words In Action on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 07:18:51 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Blank Slate......."What we have done so far this (13+ / 0-)

    year clearly hasn't worked," said the GOP aide involved in the planning sessions. "Cantor wants to take us in a new direction, which is good. The problem is we don't know where we are headed, and we don't know what we can sell to our members."

    Other than that....everything is A-Okay.

    http://www.politico.com/...

  •  Here is Bill Keller (6+ / 0-)

    trying to explain to us why the fact that the inventor of the "Rainbow Loom" is an American means the country is on the cusp of a revolution in entrepreneurship and innovation.

    Seriously, Keller is worse than Friedman in terms of sheer vapidity.

  •  Not Ready for Prime Time. (10+ / 0-)

    Also, last I heard, Warren had no interest in the White House. I'd love to see her as President, I know a lot of us would. But if she's not running then dissing her as "not ready" is pretty gratuitous.

    Early to rise and early to bed Makes a man healthy, wealthy, and dead. --Not Benjamin Franklin

    by Boundegar on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 04:48:40 AM PST

  •  good morning (13+ / 0-)

    closer to home is the new Sandy Hook Promise initiative:

    Sandy Hook Promise is embracing what we learned and has launched Parent Together – a nationwide campaign that educates and empowers parents, who place their children’s safety and wellbeing above all else, to make changes in their community to help prevent not just the next Sandy Hook but also the hundreds of thousands of other acts of gun violence every year in every state.

    Sandy Hook Promise will begin to roll out proven tools and programs for parents that initially focus in the areas of mental wellness, healthy development, community connectedness and gun safety. These tools and programs will be used by parents to help prevent gun violence within their homes, their schools, their communities and ultimately, our nation. Parent Together will also empower and foster local conversations and locally developed solutions to prevent gun violence – true change needs to come from each and every parent.

    See also:
    "You can't start the conversation with 'I don't agree with you,' which is how this often goes,'' said Mark Barden, whose son, Daniel, was one of 20 children killed in the Dec. 14 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. "If you start the conversation with 'What do we agree on and where's our common ground?' and if you start from a place of love, a parent's love for their children ... that's a great place.''

    The new campaign, called Parent Together, aims to educate parents on gun safety, mental health and the importance of strong community ties. It also calls upon parents — regardless of their politics or social views — to make a commitment to "parent together" to put an end to gun violence.

    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

    by Greg Dworkin on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 04:55:35 AM PST

  •  NY Times - Snowden asylum in Germany (13+ / 0-)
    Granting him asylum wouldn’t be about revenge or retaliation for spying on us. It would be a decision based on our fundamental values — and a moral duty. How else can we recover the public’s trust? The only way is to stand up, defend our shared values and set an example for other countries in the world.

    Mr. Snowden’s revelations are not to blame for our strained relationship with America; what’s to blame is illegal spying that affects every single person, all the way up to the chancellor. We see this comprehensive surveillance as the beginning of a meltdown of civil rights and liberties and the rule of law.

    Give Snowden Asylum in Germany
  •  Getting really sick of this... (31+ / 0-)

    Every pundit seems to claim this is the "end of Obama" or "Obamacare is doomed" simply because the website didn't work well in it's first month and that "junk coverage" was finding it's way finally to the scrap heap.

    I'd rather like to see them focusing on the failure of the insurance carriers to properly transition their clients to better plans that would be available soon due to the ACA law. But instead they act like they always have as snake oil salesmen and cut these people off instead of helping them. Instead of Obama asking for the insurance companies to keep them on these plans he should be citing how these plans were ripping off the clients themselves. How they were paying for "worthless" policies and forward these issues to the consumer watchdog agency we now have. These companies passing off junk policies should be the ones under the spotlight, not the ACA or Obama for improving the minimum level of coverage.

    But it appears that the far right has more pundits on the payroll than ever before.

    "I think it's the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately." -- George Carlin, Satirical Comic,(1937-2008)

    by Wynter on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:02:24 AM PST

  •  Jim Risen NYT journalist- guerilla war journalism (12+ / 0-)
    The increased prosecution of journalists, Bergman said, will turn reporting into “more of a guerilla war.” Without a media shield law, “we are going to have learn new ways to truthfully ensure confidentiality,” he said.

    When asked about whether he was concerned about his own well-being, Risen said he thought about it for a long time before he decided to publish his book.

    “I thought, I either publish these stories or I’m getting out of journalism,” he said. “The default position for a reporter should be to publish.”

    Prosecuted New York Times reporter speaks at journalism school event
  •  As of now, forget about flipping the house (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, Hoghead99, Sue B

    Work on saving the Senate.

    "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

    by Paleo on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:06:42 AM PST

    •  Man, you’re pessimistic! (9+ / 0-)

      If ACA signups are a success, and if most insurance premiums are reasonable priced, then the Democratic Party stands to make a huge gain in 2014.

      We need to go for the jugular!

      The worst mistake we can make is to go on the defensive, with a strategy such as "work on saving the senate".

      “The meaning of life is to find it.”

      by ArcticStones on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:18:19 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Amen! The GOP's swagger, bluff and fear tactics (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Hoghead99, a2nite, gffish, DMentalist

        have kept them in the running for the last several elections.  Even the most ardent of their base ( and dense as well) have begun to see beyond all that and realize there is no platform or plan to save the world in their playbook.  

        Do you think it is possible for so many of them to vote for a guy who will only reveal his economic plan after he is elected?  Whoops...nevermind

        As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

        by JaxDem on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:25:06 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Unfortunately (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          gffish

          I think the "I don't want no commie Librul raising my taxes and giving them to those lazy people in the ghetto!" play is going to be affective in a quite a few more election cycles.

          "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

          by Stude Dude on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:31:15 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Which is precisely why... (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            gffish, Stude Dude, Zwenkau

            ...Obamacare has to be a success!

            That will allow people to say: Hey, the government did something good for a change. Maybe we need government after all?

            Ok, then! We better elect the Blue Party that has shown it wants to run a good government, rather than the raging Red Party that wants to dismantle it and sell everything to the highest bidder.

            “The meaning of life is to find it.”

            by ArcticStones on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:36:14 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  Which explains (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Stude Dude

            why Obama trounced the "capitalist conservative lowering my taxes and ignoring the 47% lazy people in the ghetto" gop candidate, right?

            Yeah, congress is not the same as national elections.

            Still, I can't see the ACA ruining our chances of retaining the senate, which can't be gerrymandered since they are statewide elections.

      •  No, I just lived through 2010 (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stude Dude

        "More than anything, politics is about self-preservation, and the last two weeks provided numerous examples of how public opinion has turned so hard against the law that even its most ardent supporters are running for the hills. It's not just red-state Democrats, like Louisiana Sen. Mary Landrieu, distancing themselves from the law. It's blue-state senators like Oregon's Jeff Merkley and New Hampshire's Jeanne Shaheen -- and top blue-state recruits like Michigan's Gary Peters and Iowa's Bruce Braley, who voted for GOP legislation Friday that the White House said would 'gut' the law. Nearly every House Democrat in a competitive district joined with Republicans to threaten the law. Without a quick fix, those ranks will grow."

        http://politicalwire.com/...

        "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

        by Paleo on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:25:27 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I've lived through too damn many "2010s" to be (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Stude Dude, peregrine kate, fabucat

          confident the herd of cats of the "blue team" will be much different from the TP/GOP base we tend to laugh at for not voting their interests.

          No progressive measures will see the light of day until the right-wing cabal in Congress is crushed at the polls.
          Instead of going off chasing various unicorns while a real dragon is ravaging the land the "blue" electorate has to focus on what is a real enemy to progressive and even democratic causes. I have faint hopes, but certainly no expectation that the electorate—including some regulars here—has the foggiest idea how vital it is to turn out to just vote against those forces to ensure they are "crushed at the polls."

          Personally I do not feel there is much time as this idiocy of that "right-wing cabal" has stalled the nation on too many truly vital steps to correct the nation's course before we as a nation go down to the logical end of TP/GOP policies: a nation more resembling a banana republic than first world democracy. There are things that probably won't wait for "generational change" so many count on to bring enough numbers so that our lack of commitment to turn out every election no longer kills us every time we progress. Climate change won't wait. Immigration won't wait. Economic reform won't wait.

          Chasing unicorns is just fine in primaries, particularly in safe areas. Chasing a unicorn when the dragon is biting your asses is a way to get eaten.

          Until we learn to focus on the immediate problem that is that right wing tail that is wagging the dog, to vote ourselves and GOTV in local and national elections, whether there is a choice of great against bad or just better against bad or even less bad against really bad we are stalled and risk further national decline.

          We just squeaked through in Virginia this year but from a week ago:

          [Fairfax results last week showed] a turnout of 46.8%. So 53.2%, 353,882 voters, here in "blue" Fairfax failed to show in an election with a true TP nutter of long standing running for our governor—and that turnout was considered "good"! Truncate that 35,000 and just make it 3,882 progressives or liberals or just Democrats showing up and we would not be talking about lawyers and courts in Virginia now.
          If the "Obama voters" had actually showed up and voted their best interests in 2012 we would not be making so many excuses about gerrymandering and voter suppression in state after state and the House now.

          Democrats, liberals, progressives, women, people of color, youthful voters and whatever group with interest in stopping this TP/GOP idiocy cannot afford to stand by next year. That is a message every one of us on this site and in personal life need to focus upon.

          The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

          by pelagicray on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 06:02:03 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  self preservation is death (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SueDe

          That is the #1 lesson of 2010. If you start out on the back foot and refuse to defend your legislative accomplishments you are going to lose.

          You think the Republicans are going to apologize for wasting everyone's time with their 50-odd Obamacare repeal votes? No! They're proud of that bullpucky.

          You think they'll acknowledge that the shutdown was awful and stupid and self-destructive? Absolutely not! They're going to campaign on it as though the shutdown worked.

          Meanwhile the blue dogs and other feckless Democrats will go home to their constituents and grovel at their feet. "I am so sorry about Obamacare! It's not my fault! Obama is just so mean to me!". Just like they did in 2010. And they will lose, just like they did in 2010.

          •  I would love to see the Republicans (0+ / 0-)

            run on how well the government shutdown worked.  The general population hated it, and Republicans would just be reminding people that they were responsible for it.

            "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

            by SueDe on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 12:28:18 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Sadly, it would work (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              SueDe

              In six months, no one will really remember what the shutdown was about or why it happened or how it ended. The Republicans would declare victory in that the size of the budget deficit is shrinking and the evil Tyrant Obama hasn't been able to pass his immigration bill (or whatever they want to say).

              Their base would eat that up. And the independents (read embarrassed conservatives) would swallow it too.

              Yes, it's stupid and bad politics and should be the death knell of the party, but it will only hurt them if the Democrats can make it hurt.

              •  Oh they have another chance (0+ / 0-)

                in January to "stand their ground" and bring the country to a halt once again.  And I have no doubt they'll do everything they can to shoot themselves in the foot again.  If they do, none but the die-hard right wingers (and the financiers who make money every time they pull one of these pranks) will fall for their "We won!" BS again.

                "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

                by SueDe on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 03:16:29 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

    •  Nooooooooo. (4+ / 0-)

      The House is crucial. Everything depends on the House.

      "The great lie of democracy, its essential paradox, is that democracy is the first to be sacrificed when its security is at risk. Every state is totalitarian at heart; there are no ends to the cruelty it will go to to protect itself." -- Ian McDonald

      by Geenius at Wrok on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:19:06 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Do not forget the states. The House wouild not be (6+ / 0-)

        the total block to any progress it is now if we had not lost so many state legislatures in the year of the census.

        I still harbor a considerable malice for all those professing to our ideals that seemingly failed to think, to realize the importance of keeping the party of "NO!" hands off the gerrymandering levers.

        The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

        by pelagicray on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 06:06:41 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  the Stoddard blog (4+ / 0-)

    Folks could make some pretty good arguments about the ACA rollout failure and it's effect on the President's second term, but they find themselves including disingenuous bullshit. Liken it to Maureen Dowd calling the President "Barry" - Stoddard just couldn't resist throwing in the arrogant meme.

    - and Obama not only owned up to failure — something he has never done —
    •  Like Bush and Cheney owned up (4+ / 0-)

      to their mistakes or stumbles?

    •  because "Barry" is always making mistakes (0+ / 0-)

      What are these unspecified failures that he's never owned up to before?

      I have a feeling that if you started listing the actual mistakes of the Obama administration, you'd find that they quite often acknowledge those mistakes.

    •  Here is my question. (0+ / 0-)

      Who is this Stoddard douchebag and what the fuck is he talking about?

      •  She. n/t (0+ / 0-)

        Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

        by Meteor Blades on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 10:36:11 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Add an S (0+ / 0-)

          and it's the same question.

          •  She's never been a friend of... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            delphine

            ...liberals or Obama. Here's Ben Cohen in 2008:

            Who is A.B Stoddard, you might ask?

            A regular on the now canceled Tucker Carlson Show, Stoddard was a former congressional reporter for The Hill, and has appeared as a pundit on all the major news networks. She writes a column for The Hill and takes herself very, very seriously. And this irritates me beyond belief.

            Stoddard puts on an air of authority whenever on television, scrutinizing political issues in minute detail and offering expert analysis of every phrase, gaffe and speech. Stoddard has an impressive resume and certainly looks the part. But when you look at her work, there is nothing resembling critical thought, serious analysis or insight. Stoddard has essentially made a living analyzing superficial nonsense.

            An example of her insights into Hillary Clinton from last year:

            "OK, so now she's getting rapped for not tipping a waitress when she said she really did, and so today I feel sorry for Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.). But how did the gender card play with you? It has been a whole 48 hours since the week-long story of Clinton as victim of the big boys, getting eaten up at a debate by those big mean boys.....I agree with what Tucker Carlson said on his MSNBC show this week, that Clinton's strength is her strength."

            "Clinton's strength is her strength" ?? -- regurgitating Tucker Carlson phraseology really does take punditry to a new low. Stoddard also has a series of Q and A videos on The Hill, pontificating on issues important to only the most ardent political junkies.

            So what is she doing in APR? For know-thy-enemy purposes.

            Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

            by Meteor Blades on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 11:09:06 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  Warren as new Senate Majority Leader! (8+ / 0-)

    I would love to see Elizabeth Warren, or a progressive Senator allied with her, replace Harry Reid when Reid retires. That would be awesome!

    But a Warren candidacy in 2016? I can think of no better gift to the Republican Party. Elizabeth Warren is a candidate for people who think, voters who reflect on the issues. Unfortunately, American voters vote emotionally, based on bumper-sticker-length arguments.

    Elizabeth Warren has as much chance to gain the nation’s highest office as George McGovern did. The bully Chris Christie (or worse) would steamroll right over Warren. We cannot afford to make that mistake!

    “The meaning of life is to find it.”

    by ArcticStones on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:15:10 AM PST

  •  What an argument! (5+ / 0-)
    "New York needs its plutocrats. The top 1% of its taxpayers fork out a whopping 43% of the income taxes; if they leave, public services will suffer.”
    In effect, the plutocrats need more income, because they pay more taxes.  Not only are they the job creators, they are the taxpayers.
  •  While capitalism is becoming too (6+ / 0-)

    complicated for the average person to understand, lord knows I've tried and failed; what is the excuse for not fighting back against the notion that the poor/lazy are taking all the money? The other side is still making a living off of this crap. I hear it every day.

    Yet I seldom see any facts and figures to prove it, one way or the other. It's become a given in many parts of society. Part of the religion that capitalism has become. "Capitalism is the greatest system ever. If it's not working for me, then it must be "those" people's fault".

    And no I don't mean another Income Inequality Chart.

     

    We're fools whether we dance or not, so we might as well dance.

    by PowWowPollock on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:21:56 AM PST

    •  That and.... (0+ / 0-)

      Aren't we nearing four years late for a pushback against those blow-hards that pat themselves on the back for being all about "Rights! and Freedoms!"

      Shouldn't we be getting back in their face for being soooooo all about rights you sure aren't big into gay rights, worker rights, voter's rights, women's rights, reproductive rights, etc.

      (Please help me fill out that etc. thingie.)

      "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

      by Stude Dude on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:26:32 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I guess there's this. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      milkbone
      Safety net programs: About 12 percent of the federal budget in 2012, or $411 billion, supported programs that provide aid (other than health insurance or Social Security benefits) to individuals and families facing hardship.  Spending on safety net programs declined in both nominal and real terms between 2011 and 2012 as the economy continued to improve.

      These programs include:  the refundable portions of the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit, which assist low- and moderate-income working families through the tax code; programs that provide cash payments to eligible individuals or households, including Supplemental Security Income for the elderly or disabled poor and unemployment insurance; various forms of in-kind assistance for low-income families and individuals, including SNAP (food stamps), school meals, low-income housing assistance, child care assistance, and assistance in meeting home energy bills; and various other programs such as those that aid abused and neglected children.

      http://www.cbpp.org/...

      My argument, though, is always a matter of national pride: Do we really want to live in some hell-hole where people are dying in the streets?

      Also, I sometimes say, it's not about the recipients, it's about their kids. We're going to be living with them for another 60 years, so we should at least try to help set them on a track that won't increase health care costs, law enforcement costs, and will add to our tax revenues rather than taking away from them.

      •  That includes (0+ / 0-)

        things like "agricultural price support" as well, and those don't necessarily go to people who are hurting.

        Thre's also this:

        Federal and military retirement plans, veterans' benefits (including GI Bills, training programs, etc.)

        Funny how folks seem to leave out veterans' programs, because it would make them look like the heartless bastards they are.

        Even wingnuts who don't care about poor children who don't have enough food don't like to hear about veterans' needs not being met.

    •  All it takes is a real visit to a poor second or (0+ / 0-)

      destitute third world country to see the logical end of this sort of "capitalism"—great luxury in walled compounds with luxury cars whisking occupants, often guarded, past shanties and poverty stricken children.

      That is the end trajectory of our present course.

      This

      and this

      Been those places, life is good when you've got it. Lousy for most.

      The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

      by pelagicray on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 06:14:57 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  How about a productivity chart? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PsychoSavannah, Meteor Blades

      They show that the profits generated by increased productivity in the past thirty years have gone disproportionately to the very wealthy, while ordinary workers have seen their incomes stagnate.

      Support Small Business: Shop Kos Katalogue If you'd like to join the Motor City Kossacks, send me a Kosmail.

      by peregrine kate on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 06:33:29 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I'm with Will Rogers on this one... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, Dallasdoc, offgrid

    ..."I am not a member of any organized political party. I am a Democrat". I have always personally advocated for the pure, comprehensive progressive agenda. No surrender. No quarter. No compromise. No Third Way!

    Carl Davidson is spot on here:
    “Lead, follow or get out of the way.”

    "The first difficulties to overcome will be internal. The Democratic Party is not a unified force. In Congress, they divide into major clusters, from the Progressive Democrats of America (PDA) and Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) on the left, then proceeding rightward through the Old New Dealers backed by the AFL-CIO and Campaign for America’s Future, to the Clintonite New Democrats, to the shrinking Blue Dogs".

    "I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast, for I intend to go in harm's way." John Paul Jones

    by ImpeachKingBushII on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:30:30 AM PST

  •  Re. the "East Jerusalem Park" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Flyswatterbanjo, salmo

    The Mount Scopus Slopes Park is an excellent example of the nationalistic use(s) and abuse(s) of history and archaeology in the state of Israel since its formation. The assertion that the archaeological landscape within the bounds of the proposed park is "Biblical" is utter hogwash: almost no reputable archaeologists propose that the agricultural terraces, the most visible element of that landscape, are pre-Ottoman in date.

    Instead, the Mount Scopus Slopes Park is the final connection in a chain of parks (Jerusalem Walls National Park, Tzurin Valley National Park, Mount Scopus Slopes Park) intended to create a direct physical connection between the Old City and E-1.

    Real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time. (Terry Pratchett)

    by angry marmot on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:37:58 AM PST

  •  It's. A. Web site. (7+ / 0-)

    Find me a web site that complex that works 100%.

    Liberals have done more damage to the ACA by panicking than any website.

    President Obama has the amazing ability to humiliate his biggest critics, on the right and the left.

    by NoFortunateSon on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 05:59:51 AM PST

    •  Found (0+ / 0-)

      Amazon
      Apple
      American Express
      Ebay

      And please don't quibble at 100%. We'd settle for 95%.
      Any way you cut it, this has been a severe technical and managerial embarrassment.

      •  this has got to be the lamest reply (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        PsychoSavannah, askew, ten canvassers

        A few minutes on Google will show that every website you list has had major unexpected issues in the past year. I'm sure that's embarrassing for everyone. But it's not "the end of the Obama administration", it's just a website.

        http://www.forbes.com/...

        It’s been a bad week for ecommerce. On Friday, Google GOOG +0.62% temporarily went dark, causing a 40% drop in web traffic. Today Amazon.com AMZN +0.35% went down for approximately 30 minutes, preventing shoppers from accessing the site via Amazon.com, mobile and Amazon.ca.From August.

        http://motherboard.vice.com/...

        Amex down in March.

        http://abcnews.go.com/...

        EBay down in January.

        And these are just the stories that make the news. If a few hundred people can't log into EBay, oddly enough the national news doesn't have a coronary.

        Also, it's interesting that every site in your list has been around for decades. These are old, mature sites that don't do very much.

        Healthcare.Gov is getting fixed, it's much better than it was. Nov. 1 might be rough, but Nov. 2 thru forever is going to be fine.

        •  And the lamest response (0+ / 0-)

          They might have hired the guys who put together these sites which work properly (and are every bit as complicated as healthcare.gov) the vast majority of the time. Hell, they might have hired the guys who put together the software that ran Obama's last campaign.  Instead, they hired companies with checkered histories, created no genuine lead contractor, failed to supervise and launched when very much not ready. As for November 2nd, dream on.

      •  Did those web sites work 100% on launch? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        askew

        And all of those are far simpler in scope.

        President Obama has the amazing ability to humiliate his biggest critics, on the right and the left.

        by NoFortunateSon on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 07:55:45 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  "Rahm Emanuel is part of the problem, not the sol- (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, Laconic Lib, offgrid, rwgate

    tion."

    How we respond individually to that remark is pretty much where the fault line lies.

    Unfortunately David Axelrod is a BFF, which no doubt played a role in the CoS thing, which tipped O's hand about where his administration would go on Wall St., Rahm's old stomping grounds. So then Geithner was a shoe-in.

    Unfortunately, there is no number of "more and better" Democrats that can be counted upon to deliver progressive economic policy, which makes roadkill of  progressive environmental policy as well.

    You have to fix the electoral system and create representative government first. The odds that a person makes it through this system and behaves like Sanders, Warren or Grayson are too small to rest the future on.

    Trust, but verify. - Reagan
    Vote, but Occupy. - commonmass
    The 3rd Way has squandered our Resistance for a pocket full of mumbles, Such are promises All lies and jests; still a kossack's about the horse race And disregards the effects...

    by Words In Action on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 07:14:03 AM PST

  •  Why? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Zwenkau, Laconic Lib

    "But the idea that somehow this growing reputation translates into a competitive bid for the 2016 presidential nomination—The New Republic recently suggested on its cover that Warren represents the "soul" of the Democratic Party more than Hillary Clinton—is pretty over the top." -M. Hirsch.

    Why?  Because Mr. Hirsch says so?  It's long past time where some pundit in some "respectable" publication dictates what is and isn't true regarding the working class base or "soul" of the Democratic party.  

    Let Sen. Warren run and see what happens rather than restricting the voters choices before a vote has been cast.  

    Enough of that horseshit!

    If I was a communist, rich men would fear me...And the opposite applies. The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles.

    by stewarjt on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 07:21:55 AM PST

  •  You're spinning the Summers piece all wrong (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite

    Krugman agrees with Summers. And Summers isn't saying there "may be no way out of the mess" he's saying that Fed intervention is in no way sufficient. The way out of the mess is through more direct Federal stimulus (which is what Krugman has been saying for at least 5 years).

    Summers is agreeing with the Kossack community, that the recovery wasn't sufficient and that we need more stimulus. And he's making that argument forcefully and well.

    He is using his position and influence to strongly advocate for the policies many here desperately want and need. What do you want from the man? Seppuku?

    I guess every community needs its bette noirs, but why do we have to pick them from the people who agree with us?

    •  Summers didn't agree when he was... (0+ / 0-)

      ...in a position to actually DO something. In fact, he kneecapped us when he was. Five years ago, it might be recalled, some of us were saying we need more stimulus. What was Summers doing? He was making sure Christina Romer's proposal that we needed more stimulus didn't make it to President Obama's desk. Now that he's no longer in a position to effect policy, he's saying something different? Pffffft.

      Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

      by Meteor Blades on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 10:42:15 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  he was wrong then, and right now (0+ / 0-)

        Still no reason to throw him in the wood chipper. Like I said, there are plenty of people who were wrong five years ago and are still wrong. Those seem like better targets for our antipathy.

        But whatever, everyone is free to hate whoever they want to hate.

        •  One can recognize that he has (0+ / 0-)

          ...come around without either hating or praising him. My issue with him are the POLICIES he has endorsed, not his personality He has a long career of f-ups. I don't see anything in your original comment that shows me "spinning" Krugman wrong.

          Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

          by Meteor Blades on Mon Nov 18, 2013 at 01:49:07 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Elizabeth Warren just fine exactly where she is... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, Miira

    doing body cavity searches on Wall Street types and making speeches that hurt the feelings of the Koch's finger puppets. We need her there regardless who the President is.

  •  Needed: smaller financial sector w/less profits (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite

    John Quiggin (by way of WCEG):

    society as a whole would be better off if the financial sector were smaller, and received much smaller returns. A political strategy based on cutting the financial sector down to size has more promise for the Left than any alternative approach now on offer, and is a necessary precondition for a broader attempt to make the distribution of wealth and power more equal.

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