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Brittney Cooper has a sharp bit of writing on the Marcus Smart-Jeff Orr racial slur incident over at Salon.

She attracts a good many trolls who use her essays as a soap box for their bigotry. They are predictable in their talking points. The screeds are no less annoying while also being instructive about the lazy quotidian nature of colorblind racism in the post civil rights era.

I particularly enjoyed this passage from Cooper's piece:

In this regard, then, I’m actually intrigued by Jeff Orr’s rush to apologize and to clarify that he didn’t use a slur to refer to Marcus Smart. White folks, too, want their humanity conceded, even after they have actively disrespected someone else. And a credible argument for racism is the one thing that has the potential to erode that. At base level they recognize that racism is dehumanizing, and that if they are racist they are human in all the worst ways. Unfortunately, this has not led to a change in behavior, so much as a stalwart campaign to get racist behaviors branded as anything but. Still, what should be clear to us is that we all desire recognition as human beings and not monsters. The problem is that only one group has the power to force their desires on the rest of us.

Marcus Smart’s dignity was assaulted when Jeff Orr called him the N-word, and a “piece of crap.” Really, in this context, they are the same thing. A white man reducing a black man who is going about his work to mere waste performs the same kind of labor that the N-word does, whether it was used or not.

The responses to Cooper's sharp argument about how white privilege still enables overt white racism--while black and brown victims are always suspect and made to apologize for their being accosted and imposed upon--followed a predictable script.

The comments in response to Cooper's essay feature common white racist deflections. Predictably, how calling attention to the extreme likelihood that Smart was called a racial slur by Orr is in fact an example of "reverse racism" against white people.

The latter point is absurd; white racism is demonstrated once more to be a type of mental pathology and distorted thinking.

To my eyes, perhaps it is linked fate, shared experience, or just common sense, but Marcus Smart was clearly called something profoundly offensive by Jeff Orr. The latter's mouth uttered something more than "a piece of crap". Just as a woman knows when she was called a "bitch", a black man or woman knows when they were called a "nigger".

In all, this episode of public hate speech by a white man against a young black man on national television leads us to a basic question: how should Marcus Smart have reacted? More generally, what should parents and other mentors teach young people of color, black folks in particular, regarding how best to respond to racial hate speech when it is directed to them by white people?

Should black youth be taught, along with the obligatory "how not to get killed by cops when being racially profiled for 'driving while black' moment", Booker T. Washington's life mantra that: “I will permit no man to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him”?

Or should black youth read the The Gentlemen's Book of Etiquette for guidance on how to manage racial invective and other insults?

Alternatively, should young black men like Marcus Smart be given a copy of the American iconoclast and genius Richard Wright's The Ethics of Living Jim Crow, and told to meditate on his observations about how to survive the humiliations of white supremacy (which so many African-Americans still navigate today, albeit in an altered and "colorblind" fashion)?

One night, just as I was about to go home, I met one of the Negro maids. She lived in my direction, and we fell in to walk part of the way home together. As we passed the white nightwatchman, he slapped the maid on her buttock. I turned around amazed. The watchman looked at me with a long, hard, fixed under stare. Suddenly he pulled his gun, and asked:

"Nigger, don't yuh like it?"
I hesitated.
"I asked yuh don't yuh like it?" he asked again, stepping forward.
"Yes, sir," I mumbled.
"Talk like it, them"
"Oh, yes, sir!" I said with as much heartiness as I could muster.
Outside, I walked ahead of the girl, ashamed to face her. She caught up with me and said:
"Don't be a fool; yuh couldn't help it!"
This watchman boasted of having killed two Negroes in self defense.
Yet, in spite of all this, the life of the hotel ran with an amazing smoothness. It would have been impossible for a stranger to detect anything. The maids, the hall-boys, and the bell-boys were all smiles.
They had to be.

If you are not white in America you will need to learn how to navigate white hate speech.

I was first called a "nigger" in elementary school. Many years later, I was called a "nigger" to my face by my direct supervisor.

I made sure that my elementary school hate monger suffered vicious blows at my hand.

As an adult, I fantasized about stripping my bigoted boss down to his underwear and punishing him with my belt--the blows delivered with the heavy buckle--and then laughing while he cried. Of course, I did not do such a thing. Adulthood often requires swallowing one's insults and pain as we pursue other solutions.

These are the war stories of those black and brown folks born in post civil rights America. We are not in the midst of the high intensity conflict experienced by our parents and grandparents who survived Jim and Jane Crow. The battle still goes on; the dangers remain real...albeit transformed and different in many ways.

The case of Marcus Smart, and the instinctive defense of Jeff Orr's racial slur by some in the white public, is an example of how white supremacy works in a colorblind age. The experiences of black and brown folks with white racism are made suspect--even when empirical reality demonstrates that white racism is not an anachronism or an outlier. As such, the reasonable assumption should be that white racism is operative until proven otherwise. The opposite is taken as a given because the benefit of the doubt should always be given to white folks when charges of racism are involved.

The assumption of white benevolence, and how white supremacy is an outlier fiction, anachronism, and fantasy by people of color, leads to grotesque conclusions on the part of those who view life through the white racial frame.

For the White Gaze, Trayvon Martin should have naturally submitted to George Zimmerman; the former has no right to "stand his ground".

Jonathan Ferrell was in a car accident and seeking help from the police. Of course, he was a "giant negro" and the police, armed with guns and all variety of other weapons, were "logically" afraid and within their rights to shoot an unarmed man dead 10 times.

Renisha McBride was knocking on a stranger's door for help after she suffered a car accident one late evening. For McBride, it is given that she was a burglar. What reasonable person would not shoot her in the head with a shotgun for the "crime" of seeking help?

Jordan Davis and his friends were listening to music in their car. They offended Michael Dunn. He was upset because they were not sufficiently deferent to his complaints. Thus, Dunn shot Jordan dead because he had to "stand his ground".

Looking back on my childhood, I am not sure if I would tell my children to beat without mercy a white person who called them a "nigger". My parents taught me that lesson. I remain gratified for their wisdom.

But, given the zero-tolerance policies of public schools, and the documented racism and classism against young black and brown youth by school teachers and administrators, I would not want my children's futures to be ruined because of my, perhaps dated, advice.

They may have acted honorably in the moment, however, such actions could doom their futures.

Yet, I remain troubled by a public norm for the survival of young black youth that tells them to submit to white racism and white hate speech because resisting acts of verbal and premeditated violence by whatever means reasonably necessary will see them punished unfairly.

In a perfect world, white bigots such as Jeff Orr would be fed their teeth by young men like Marcus Smart.

We live in this world. It is unfair and unjust. Consequently, Smart has to apologize. Orr is a victim.

I do not know what to do in terms of making sure that young black and brown youth like Marcus Smart do not sacrifice their futures by doing what is the right and honorable thing in the short-term, but which may hurt them in the years to come.

 Navigating the colorline has never been easy. What to do? What advice to give them?

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Comment Preferences

  •  Good post. Smart's actions (5+ / 0-)

    in confronting the racist were justified.  

    Join us on the Black Kos front porch to review news and views written from a black pov—everyone is welcome.

    by TomP on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:37:04 PM PST

  •  I'd suggest that he take the high road . (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Victor Ward, ColoTim

    Like water off a ducks back .

    "please love deeply...openly and genuinely." A. M. H.

    by indycam on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:38:50 PM PST

      •  I didn't say the easy road . (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Be Skeptical

        The low road is the easy road .
        The high road takes more effort .
        I believe MLK jr took the high road .

        "please love deeply...openly and genuinely." A. M. H.

        by indycam on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 03:47:38 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yeah, every 19-year old needs to be (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Richard Lyon, chimene

          exactly like MLK!

          Absolutely, all young boys faced with constant harassment need to be exactly like Jackie Robinson, and MLK, because god forbid they respond aggressively to this constant stream.

          I have over the years spoken to a ton of former college basketball players who have stories about having racial slurs tossed at them by fans. They are conditioned before games to never go into the stands, and just keep their anger in check, no matter the cost to their mental and physical health. They are also pressured not speak about it to the media after games, to keep up the illusion of college athletics as some kind of innocent, wholesome endeavor. This dynamic, as much as anything, speaks to the utter powerlessness of so-called student-athletes.
                                    *****
          One person tweeted to me that Jackie Robinson would never have gone into the stands when called a racial slur. This “Jackie Robinson: model minority” nonsense needs to be unpacked. First of all, that was 1947. Times have changed. Second, Jackie Robinson, a husband and a father, would have risked organized violence, as in lynch mobs, if he had pursed a physical response against fans. Third, Jackie Robinson was a 26-year-old Army veteran and a college graduate from UCLA. He also carried the hopes and dreams of masses of people with every at-bat. To ask a 19-year-old Marcus Smart to act in accordance with Jackie Robinson [or MLK] is a ridiculous weight to ask Mr. Smart to carry. And lastly Jackie Robinson, if you read his searing memoir, I Never Had It Made, had real regrets about not going into the stands and pummeling racists with what he called “my despised black fists.” Jackie Robinson died way too young at age 53. He and his family always believed that his early death was connected to the stress that he had to carry precisely because he kept it all bottled in on direct orders from the Brooklyn Dodgers organization and on society’s orders, shaped by the pre-civil rights times in which he played.
          http://www.thenation.com/...

          It's *Gandhi*, not Ghandi

          by poco on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 04:14:06 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Advice was asked for , advice was given . (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Be Skeptical

            If you dislike it , so be it .

            Yeah, every 19-year old needs to be
            exactly like MLK!
            Is that what I said ? Every 19 year old ? Exactly like MLK jr ?

            "please love deeply...openly and genuinely." A. M. H.

            by indycam on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 04:25:33 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  From what I've read of Jackie Robinson's (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            poco

            personality, he was a combative guy and not inclined to put up with sh*t.  (Note: the qualities that when practiced by white men make them successful and respected and when practiced by women and people of color make them "pushy.")  I can't imagine being that talented an athlete and that strong both physically and mentally and listening to that dehumanizing garbage day after day and then not being allowed to respond to it and to be told to stuff it down.  I thought I also read that he was a diabetic.  Given how in shape he was physically, it most likely wasn't Type II (which tends to happen to people who are older and heavy).  Type I can be hereditary, but, in many cases, it can be brought on my on-going, extreme stress.  Fighting the urge to clock asshat after asshat, day after day and year after year strikes me as just the kind of intense stress that would bring it on.  What he did was heroic, but he paid a terrible price.

    •  I'd suggest that taking the high road (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Richard Lyon, poco

      might be difficult if you concede the possibility exists this is a variation of verbal abuse he could have experienced  every single day of his life. At some point, not reacting to it would become improbable, if not impossible.

      Live so that when your children think of fairness, caring and integrity, they think of you. H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

      by Ellen Columbo on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 01:58:36 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Would you say MLK jr took the high road ? (0+ / 0-)

        I'm not saying its easy , I was asked what I would advise , I advised the high road , I not be ashamed for the advise I was asked for and gave .

        "please love deeply...openly and genuinely." A. M. H.

        by indycam on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 03:50:43 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  HOW to take the high road (Mrs. Roosevelt's style) (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jes2, Be Skeptical

      I find this polite response to name-calling and hate-speech works wonders:

      "I'm sorry--I don't understand."

      Makes the other person feel like a total fool, blush, and backtrack or go away.

      Incomprehension is such a good tool.

      If "I'm sorry--I don't understand." isn't enough, then follow up with "Please explain......." because, really, if someone calls me a name I do want to know more precisely what they mean by it. And if I have offended anyone I want the opportunity to apologize.

      Reminds me of Obama's "Do go on. . . . "

      Eleanor Roosevelt gave great advice.

      Once I observed a black nurse being called "N*gger" etc. by an elderly patient she was helping prepare for bed. The nurse replied, "Yes, that's what you called me yesterday, too....Now give me your [false]  teeth. . . . "

      I think it was Jonathan Swift who used to practice his rhetoric by trading insults with the women selling fish in the market place and that he reduced one of them to tears by calling her "An isosceles triangle"

      P.S. What does the 'n-word' MEAN nowadays? IMHO it means that the name-caller is prejudiced and irritable and rude.

    •  Here's my WHITE DAD explanation (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Richard Lyon, poco

      So, I tell my kids who are half-Asian:

      If anybody calls you a racially-charged anything => PUNCH THEM.

      And, you know something, I FEEL TOTALLY GOOD ABOUT TELLING THEM THAT.

      From one white guy to another white guy, I would suggest you fuck off.

      From one white guy to another white guy, this is what I tell my kids:

      "If YOU call someone a racially-charged anything, if the person who is the object of that shoves you, GOOD, if the person who is the object of that does NOT shove you, I WILL.'

      Now, you might say 'well, that's just teaching violence.'

      HELL. NO.  A shove is an attention-getter and that's precisely what Smart did.

      Here's the deal: I LOVE THIS.  You know why?

      Because if Smart takes the 'HIGH ROAD'.  Guess what?

      ORR KEEPS DOING IT AND - consistent with white privilege - can keep doing it.  

      Since Smart shoves Orr, good ol' Orr has to get tried in the court of public opinion.

      And, if Smart takes the high road, Texas Tech doesn't do squat.

      If Smart escalated it, fine.  Let's be honest here: I know several Texas Tech faculty and they are THRILLED with Orr getting the boot and Smart 'only' getting a three game suspension.  They hate the fact that Orr's name and actions are associated with their University.

      I am thrilled with this outcome.

      •  Your kids might get a bloody nose (0+ / 0-)

        here and there, but they will grow up with a lot more self respect than if they had spent their lives cowering in fear. The people giving all this high minded advice have likely never come close to having to actually deal with such a problem.

      •  Orr and Smart (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        poco
        Let's be honest here: I know several Texas Tech faculty and they are THRILLED with Orr getting the boot and Smart 'only' getting a three game suspension.  They hate the fact that Orr's name and actions are associated with their University.
        I don't recall Orr "getting the boot." He (on his own accord) has decided to not attend anymore Texas Tech basketball games the rest of the year.

        Plus, I have not seen any reaction from the Texas Tech administration suggesting any penalties on Orr. They have said they will investigate, but have not done so.

        This is not the first time that Orr has had an issue with a black basketball player. He gave an obscene gesture on national TV to a Texas A+M player awhile back, too.

        Orr flipping off a player

  •  If a black man does anything to express his (15+ / 0-)

    anger, even if it is limited to entirely verbal behavior, he will be immediately be convicted of the crime of invading the comfort zones of polite white Americans.

  •  I think when we say that some words... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Victor Ward, Dr Swig Mcjigger

    ...are so bad that it's OK to use physical force in return, we're likely going down a bad path. What's often forgotten in these cases ("these cases" in the broadest sense of "X provokes Y") is that there's a big middle ground between saying something's wrong and should be punished, and that it's right and should be praised.  That middle ground is "eh, it happened, nothing to do about it now."  That's how I feel about this.  I think as a side matter the conference was right to suspend Smart for 3 games because there's an overriding imperative, which you can call a business or liability imperative if you want, that players can't hit fans.  

    It's not the side effects of the cocaine/I'm thinking that it must be love

    by Rich in PA on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:47:10 PM PST

    •  and fans can hurl racial invective at will (5+ / 0-)

      at players and not expect a response? talk about white privilege in action.

      •  Fans shouldn't be hurling any invective (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Victor Ward

        But that doesn't change the fact that you have no proof Orr's insults were racial in nature.

      •  They do get a response. (6+ / 0-)

        They're kicked out of the building, especially in basketball where the referees are right there.  The question is whether there should be some physical consequence beyond that.  Clearly you're right about racial invective as an expression of white privilege, but this is one of the venues where there are effective sanctions against it short of popping the racist in the face.

        As to what Smart should have done in a turn-back-time way (and like I said, I'm totally meh about what he did do), ideally he'd go to the ref and say the guy over there called me xxx and either he goes or I go.  That's how you leverage college basketball's business imperative in your favor.

        It's not the side effects of the cocaine/I'm thinking that it must be love

        by Rich in PA on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:56:44 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  And that NEVER. HAPPENS. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          poco

          Please, this is a straw man at its very finest.

          White guys yelling racially-charged words:

          'Thug' => NO, NOT EXACTLY the 'n' word;

          'Piece of crap' => No, not exactly the 'n' word;

          'Crackhead' => no NOT EXACTLY the 'n' word;

          And, let's not forget Orr has used the middle finger salute, as well as the 'up yours'.

          CLASSIC. WHITE. PRIVILEGE.

          Well, I just think you should walk away.

          Hey, pal, be a black guy for 5 months AND THEN, get back to me about 'I just think you SHOULD walk away.'

          Oh....and how often does a NON-DRUNK fan - ESPECIALLY IN EXPENSIVE SEATS - ever get thrown out of the arena?

          Please, please, stop with the white mans-plaining of your interpretation.

          And 'the business imperative.'  Uh, yeah, OK, considering that close over 50% of D-1 basketball programs are NOT in a BCS conference, the 'business angle' is a JOKE of an argument.

          In other words, in the classic WHITE GUY interpretation 'well, we can hurt them in the pocketbook'....because that's HOW WHITE PEOPLE think.

          Not only is that the wrong angle/white mans-plaining, it is also FACTUALLY incorrect for ALL of D-II college BB (as if ANY D-II college BB program runs a profit!) and over 50% of D-1 basketball programs.

          •  In other words.... (0+ / 0-)

            Either you are only a BCS-conference follower of D-1 basketball or you are clueless about the 50% of college programs that are D-1 and RUN A DEFICIT for teams in the Patriot Conference, Horizon League and the host of '1-bid' leagues out there.

            The 'hurt them in the pocketbook' is just classic dumbshit white guy 'that'll teach 'em' white privilege crap.

            White GUYS just DON'T. GET. IT.  THERE IS NOTHING in their lives equivalent to being called the 'n' word or being subject to the racial discrimination of a black male.

            And, the funny thing is, I just KNOW you are CHOMPING at the bit to say what your EQUIVALENT experience is in terms of being called the 'n' word.

            And, I am a white guy.

            •  Not sure what your answer is... (0+ / 0-)

              Are you suggesting that Marcus was correct in pushing Orr, based on his verbal assault, simply because he is black and Orr is white, and the world is not fair?

              1) Let's assume that Orr falls backwards and injures himself.

              2) Let's assume that Orr pushes back and a melee with other players and fans occur.

              Do either of those outcomes help Marcus Smart or any black person try to overcome "white privilege" in America?

              I also find it a bit strange that you feel you can speak for black people (and how they should respond) even though you are a white person.

              •  No, I do not speak for black people (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                poco, Richard Lyon

                It works like this:

                If a black guy gets mad about a RACIALLY-charged incidence, guess what, I give the OFFENDED PARTY the 'dreaded benefit of the doubt' in terms of how to act.

                I don't feel like it's might duty/position/call to tell a black guy how to react to racially-charged comments.  What I AM qualified to opine on is that what Orr said was wrong and what Orr has done in the past is wrong.  I also think Smart actually showed restraint of all things and if half of the white people I know of weren't so afraid of black people, a little shove would be laughed off.  

                And, let's walk this back in terms of logic:

                1.  Orr has a history of very confrontational, rude and disgusting displays AND THERE IS VIDEO PROOF OF THAT.

                2.  Orr has ADMITTED - rather like a guilty plea, if you will - of the LESSER offense of calling Smart 'a piece of crap.'

                3.  Smart shoved Orr.

                4.  How many times has Smart EVER shoved a fan before this?  None.

                5.  How many times does one see a college player shove a fan?  Extremely rarely.

                So, based upon FACTS and there is NO white guy interpretation to the above facts, I am going to give Smart the benefit of the doubt and let HIM decide what he should do.  

                And, finally, in terms of logic let's put it this way:

                How come Orr has volunteered NOT to go to Texas Tech BB games this season?  If he was TOTALLY innocent why would he do such a thing?  Is it because of the dreaded 'political correctness'?  Moreover, Smart gets a 'wrist slap' of a suspension of 3 games....which is pretty telling in and of itself.

                Last, but not least: let's say a white player shoved a white guy to the extent that Smart shoved Orr.  Would ANYONE be talking about it?  No.

                •  A couple of comments (0+ / 0-)
                  If a black guy gets mad about a RACIALLY-charged incidence, guess what, I give the OFFENDED PARTY the 'dreaded benefit of the doubt' in terms of how to act.
                  I'm sure that both Ida Wells and W.E.B. DuBois would shake their heads at your statement over a young black man being called a simple name in a college basketball game, with the assumption that it be "fair game" to retaliate physically.

                  Marcus, who attended OSU for free, will soon be making millions of dollars in the NBA and be allowed to live anywhere he wants in this country, and will be idolized by millions of young fans.

                  Even if we assume that it was a "racially charged incident", that still does not give a right to Marcus to push Orr. The good thing is that Marcus realized that once he cooled down. That is why he apologized to Orr later on. There is simply no good to what could come from any type of physical retaliation. Luckily, Marcus is a good kid and understands that he reacted bad due to frustration.

                  There is a lot of racism still occurring in the US, but this is not the situation to overreact. Marcus will probably not ever have to deal with the level of racism or sexism that 99% of the minority populations in this country deal with on a daily basis.

    •  No. (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      HCKAD, TomP, Deep Texan, Nowhere Man

      The n word is not just a word.  It is the continuation and propagation of hate, repression, and pain.  Smarts apology should say something like this,  "I apologize for not keeping my temper in the face of abject racism that was spit into my face.  I will strive to not react physically to slurs in this racist and unfair society. I will try to bring a controlled and dignified manner to every racial slur put towards me and my loved ones."  This would help people realize what racism is and that it exists every day for every African American. Never apologize for reacting to racism.

      Everyone! Arms akimbo! 68351

      by tobendaro on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 01:01:42 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  If I was on a jury .... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mikejay611, tobendaro, poco

    From the legal interwebs:

    fighting words n. words intentionally directed toward another person which are so nasty and full of malice as to cause the hearer to suffer emotional distress or incite him/her to immediately retaliate physically (hit, stab, shoot, etc.) While such words are not an excuse or defense for a retaliatory assault and battery, if they are threatening they can form the basis for a lawsuit for assault.

    IMO fighting words should be an excuse and/or defense for a retaliatory assault.  

    We needn't clog up the court with civil suits. The first couple of punches could be legalized. Let's call it Standing Your Emotional Ground.

    “The answer must be, I think, that beauty and grace are performed whether or not we will or sense them. The least we can do is try to be there.” ― Annie Dillard, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek

    by 6412093 on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:52:47 PM PST

  •  Typical (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jhecht

    Base your entire premise on something that may not have even happened
    Admit that it may not have happened
    Proceed as if it did happen, throwing up a smokescreen of actual events to obscure that your original premise is weak, at best.  
    Throw in the obligatory any-white-people-who-disagree-are-demonstrating-their-racism.

    Rinse and repeat as necessary.

    Cooper did the same thing over at Salon.com.

    So my question is - how (and when) do we address false accusations of racism?   After all, there's no proof that Marcus Smart is telling the truth - as you and Cooper both  admit (begrudgingly) above.  

    ps:  Jeff Orr is just another piece of shit loser "sports fan" who lives his miserable  life vicariously through a bunch of 18-22 year old kids.

    •  all those false accusations of racism (8+ / 0-)

      so many, everywhere. damn! it is hard out there for white folks. how do they manage?

      •  Snark does not equal proof (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Victor Ward

        Please proceed, Chauncey.

        •  The classic 'well, not really' (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          poco

          Get over yourself,

          What EXACTLY does it take?

          Oh, I know: the 'n' word.  That's IT.  That's only it.  Anything else, well that doesn't count.

          Like I said above:

          Thug, piece of crap, 'you're not my type', 'crackhead' are all 'loaded' terms, but NOT EXACTLY the 'n' word.

          And, come on, the false accusations of racism FAR EXCEED the # of real incidents of racism.

          And, THAT'S REALLY WHERE WE OUGHT TO BE TAKING THIS CONVERSATION, right?

          I mean, come one, the poor old white guy got shoved?!?!?!

          OMIGOD!  I mean, what is this world coming to!??!?!

          Give me a break, YOUR BIGGEST CONCERN IN ALL OF THIS is.....let me guess:

          Charges of false racism.

          Well, glad we got that out of the way.

      •  They yell (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Victor Ward

        for Prissy to bring them their smelling salts.

    •  Prediction (0+ / 0-)

      I can already foresee this entire conversation unfolding just like the Dayna Morales diary.   lol

      •  i love talking point racists, the tactic (8+ / 0-)

        of having the standard of proof for racism defined by white people is a classic white supremacist white privileged strategy. i love it! because of course all of black and brown folks make up all these examples because we are deranged, overly sensitive, and/or out to get white folks.

        when in doubt on these matters i side with the person of color who said they were the victim of a racial slur, women who say they were subjected to sexism, and gays and lesbians who were slurred or treated unfairly.

        there is little to be gained and often much to be lost by truth-telling on those matters. white racists usually win as demonstrated by your instinctive behavior of white bigotry and privilege with cries of "evidence!" "convince me!"

        bad comedy really.

        •  What about YOUR "standard of proof", Chauncey? (3+ / 0-)

          Jeff Orr is already a piece of shit - if he's lying, then add "racist" to his rap sheet.

          If Marcus Smart is lying, then it's because he knows he'll get away with it because of the assumptions of those like you who automatically side with him based on nothing more than the color of his skin.

          We have no proof either way - and yet you still expended much energy proceeding as if we do.

          "when in doubt on these matters i side with the person of color who said they were the victim of a racial slur, women who say they were subjected to sexism, and gays and lesbians who were slurred or treated unfairly."

          I'm glad you finally admitted to your own race-based biases.   It's shit like this that makes people skip over reports like that latest horror out of Jasper TX (slit throat = accidental overdose?)

          •  be careful. your white privilege is showing (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Richard Lyon, poco, Deep Texan, Kevskos

            what good fun! keep us entertained.

            •  You raise an interesting hyper-meta-point (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Be Skeptical

              White privilege is unavoidable--it's inherent and ingrained, assuming of course you're white--so if we're just instantiations of the structure, as we liked to say back in (white) grad school, how are we supposed to renounce it?  One way, I suppose, would be to step aside and let all black voices speak unchallenged on racialized issues.  But everything's a racialized issue in our country and I just don't have the temperament to let things pass unchallenged if I think they're wrong or dangerous.  

              It's not the side effects of the cocaine/I'm thinking that it must be love

              by Rich in PA on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 01:36:23 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  You renounce it by ceasing (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Deep Texan, poco

                to think that white people have an inherent right to make the rules and telling people who disagree with them that their objections are out of order.

                •  OK, I feel like I've done that. (0+ / 0-)

                  But not everyone will agree.

                  It's not the side effects of the cocaine/I'm thinking that it must be love

                  by Rich in PA on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 01:46:41 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                •  Sure (0+ / 0-)

                  But that's what CdV is doing here to Jeff Orr and anyone who points out that there is no evidence supporting Smart's claim.

                  So I ask what I sarcastically referred to in another post - do we start calling that "brown privilege" - where any minority yelling "racist!" is automatically granted Truth Teller status no matter the circumstances?

                  •  It's called statistical probability. (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    poco

                    The chances are that they probably are telling the truth.

                    •  So, can we apply that standard evenly? (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      Be Skeptical

                      If a business owner eyes every minority customer with suspicion based upon statistical probability and/or past experiences with minority customers, are we all cool with that now?

                      Did I miss a memo somewhere - is racial profiling okay again, or just for some people?

                      •  Except the business owner (2+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        poco, Adam AZ

                        would have to show some statistics to prove it. Racial profiling fails the statistical reality test. It is based on fevered white fantasies.

                        •  Let's try this one (0+ / 0-)

                          So, is it fair to consider Smart's reputation as a flopper?

                          Smart seems to have a flair for embellishment - if we're being fair, we should probably consider the possibility that he's not above pointing his finger and screaming "racism" to cover his own behavior.

                          •  ??? that is some inside sports nonsense. Everyone (0+ / 0-)

                            flops, coaches run flopping drills. It got so bad they made changes to how refs call the game this year. Singling out Smart is fan rage, nothing more. There is plenty of evidence (for me anyway) that the fan said something truly terrible, much worse than the supposed "piece of crap" claim. Watch the video, watch the way he whips around. I'm glad Smart was able to limit his reaction to a mild shove, for his own sake. Think of the pearl clutching if he actually became violent.

                          •  In the absence of actual proof... (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            Be Skeptical

                            ...anything is possible.

                            So far on this thread I've seen people who are automatically taking Smart's side because of "statistical probability", because of Orr's white skin, because of Orr's past actions as an annoying "superfan", because they themselves have been called "n****r in the past,  because racism exists in America, etc, etc, etc.    And still nobody has any proof that Orr said it other than Smart's accusation.

                            So, if we're to enter all that other shit into evidence, why do we ignore Smart's reputation as a "flopper"?   That article I linked was written a couple days before the incident with Orr.   Why are all these other things supposedly relevent but Smart's reputation is not?

            •  You use the same tactics as rightwingers (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Be Skeptical

              A few hundred words here, a few hundred words there, and eventually it just becomes conventional wisdom that Orr said it - everyone forgets that despite all your flowery enlightened rhetoric there is no proof other than Marcus Smart's words.

        •  I am white and I like to think of myself as not (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Be Skeptical

          racist.  I'm perfectly capable of believing claims of racism by "black and brown folks" because many more times than not the claims are real.

          Each of your examples; Trayvon Martin, Jonathan Ferrell, Renisha McBride, & Jordan Davis all victims of 100% pure unadulterated racism, no doubt about it.

          But here I have to disagree.  Orr seems like a real POS and I like Marcus Smart but I watched that game live and the only person I saw use the "N-word" was Marcus Smart.  Texas Tech asked a bunch of people in the area and no one said that Orr used the "N-word".  There is no proof he used that word.  And you can't claim he did without "evidence."  Calling someone a "piece of crap" is not the same as calling some one the "N-word."

          I would agree with Richard Sherman that calling someone a thug is much the same as using the "N-word."  But in my world "piece of crap" is race neutral.

      •  and I am sure you have NO PROBLEM (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Richard Lyon, poco

        telling WOMEN how they SHOULD act if they are called 'bitch'.  The condescending attitude is hilarious.

        Here's the deal: I am smart enough to know that I DON'T know what it is like to be black in this country. I am also smart enough to know when white people just 'skirt the edges' of racially-charged words (but again, in white mans-plaining 'it MIGHT NOT HAVE BEEN the 'n' word, how do we know?).  And, finally, I am smart enough to know that 'piece of crap' from a guy who has a history (check on the interwebs for 'Jeff Orr behavior' and you'll see) of pretty incendiary language probably FINALLY has it coming.

        A shove for the poor ol' white guy.  Oh my, the horrors!

    •  And likewise (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Vita Brevis, Meteor Blades

      are we to assume because Mr. Orr volunteered that he did NOT use the word 'nigger' without anyone even asking, that he is telling the truth? I mean, where does this unsolicited denial even originate?

      No star is lost once we have seen, We always may be what we might have been. Adelaide Proctor -7.25/-5.64

      by mikejay611 on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:58:29 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  A fair point (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Victor Ward

        We can discuss it in the plethora of "poor Jeff Orr" diaries.

        Agreed?

      •  How do you know nobody asked him that? (0+ / 0-)

        I'll bet he was asked that within a couple of minutes of the incident.  But I don't know.

        What I have read is that there is no recording of his using it during the game and that nobody in the area would specifically say they heard him use that term.

        I would not be surprised if he did or didn't.  He's on camera using "FU" gestures and other things against another player back in 2010 and it's obvious he goes to great lengths to distract the players on the other team from doing their job of playing basketball or football (he goes to as many of those games as he can, home or away).

        This guy is way overdue imo for a separation from being a fan at games, especially courtside within inches at times from players and I should think the school should encourage him to channel his "superfan" status (per previous articles on the school's website) in a way more upstanding than what he's devolved into.  If they don't stand up to him, then they deserve to be ridiculed and lumped in with him.

        All that said, athletes must never interact with a fan the way Smart did.  He has got to control himself and I like the approach of either getting his coach or the refs to take action, preferably the coach.  If the player is out of control, he's not going to be of use to his team and the coach should sit him or send him back to the locker room.  He will otherwise be a distraction and I'm surprised there actually was no way that the referees could not eject Smart just to get him out of the room and away from the action.

        I don't care that Smart is black, or if another player is white, brown or polka-dotted.  Smart has been trained his whole career to not talk back to fans or take action against them.  To ignore insults and to just focus on his game.  A player shoving a fan is beyond acceptable and I don't care what reasons he cares to give.  

        Smart is suffering under incredible pressure, in part because he's potentially costing himself millions of dollars for having returned to school this year.  He was likely to have been one of the top five players selected in last year's draft but he elected to return.  His poor play at times this season, his team's losing games as a result and losing to a team they should have beaten the other night - well it all bubbled to a head.  Having Orr heaping abuse on him - whatever words were used, sent him over the top.  But his reaction was wrong and the three game suspension is his cooling off period.

        Now that people know they can get to him, that they can cause him to lose his cool, it will likely get worse, especially in pro arenas.  Orr would probably be considered an amateur by some people who will be at the pro games, and there are people who take delight in tearing others down.

        I feel sorry for Smart, disgusted with Orr and I hope things get worked out during this suspension so that Smart can have a good finish to his year (except when he plays KU).

  •  Wonderful take (7+ / 0-)

    on a very painful subject. Funny how folks with less pigmentation than some of us always expect more control from the darker of us, lest they be made to feel uncomfortable, yet they also require constant forgiveness and understanding when they act a fool... Post racial, color blind society, indeed...

    No star is lost once we have seen, We always may be what we might have been. Adelaide Proctor -7.25/-5.64

    by mikejay611 on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 01:01:26 PM PST

  •  text him sexytime (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    6412093

    and get his wife to kick his ass out, take half his money.

    sign him up for tons of crap on the internet.

    punch him in the neck.

    -You want to change the system, run for office.

    by Deep Texan on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 01:44:55 PM PST

  •  "Alleged" (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Be Skeptical

    Unless there's some witness to what he called Smart, there's no way to know what was said. Calling someone racist over an unsubstantiated allegation is uncalled for. Although he certainly appears to be a jerk.

  •  Did the chair he kicked also call him a n*****? (0+ / 0-)

    You are aware that he has a history of poor behavior during games. That he had to apologize for his behavior in a game only a few weeks earlier. Before you make all these accusations of racism, maybe you should look into who you're defending.

    I'm no philosopher, I am no poet, I'm just trying to help you out - Gomez (from the song Hamoa Beach)

    by jhecht on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 01:55:46 PM PST

    •  high quality white privilege trolls today (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Richard Lyon, poco

      good stuff.

      damn that angry negro kicked a chair. he is so badly behaved and menacing!

      another deflection. the instinctive defense of orr is fascinating, just like with zimmerman.  

      orr can be a jerk and a racist. the overlaps are pretty high.

      create a straw man that someone who is a victim of white racial invective has to be perfect and a saint, if not then no white racism can apply...or maybe, and here is the rub, smart "deserved it" somehow.

      •  I didn't know chairs had a race (3+ / 0-)

        I'm sorry if pointing out his history blows this nonsensical diary out of the water. By the way. I'm not white, so now what do you have?

        I'm no philosopher, I am no poet, I'm just trying to help you out - Gomez (from the song Hamoa Beach)

        by jhecht on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 02:04:48 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  your race is irrelevant (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          poco

          there are many people of color who are deeply invested in white racism and who also defend white privilege and white supremacy. clarence thomas being a great example.

          non-nonsensical? your lack of critical thinking is showing. so are you suggesting that people of color--who you ostensibly claim to be--and African Americans in particular do not have to reason through how to navigate direct racism? Please say no as that would be very entertaining and revealing.

          •  Sorry if reality blows your narrative (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Be Skeptical

            If someone could corroborate his claims, I would be praising him for his restraint. Not a single person or other player has corroborated this claim. You see everything through a racial lens. I tend to "follow the money". Especially when it comes to the NCAA and sports. Losing their best player for 3 games could have a lot of negative financial effects for OSU. Seeding in the tournament helps you go further, and enhances your payout, If his claims could be corroborated I would have to believe that OSU would have fought the suspension, and try to get something more in line with Johnny Manziel's 1/2 game suspension.

            I'm no philosopher, I am no poet, I'm just trying to help you out - Gomez (from the song Hamoa Beach)

            by jhecht on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 02:19:35 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  your lack of critical thinking is showing again (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Richard Lyon, poco

              you are on a roll!

              "You see everything through a racial lens. I tend to "follow the money". "

              Again, you are presumptuous about my understanding of social reality. Two, you are rather simple minded in how you do not understand how material interests and racism often overlap.

              Please continue. Good fun.

              •  Yes, resorting to name calling (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Be Skeptical

                when you can't refute facts really shows deep critical thinking.

                I'm no philosopher, I am no poet, I'm just trying to help you out - Gomez (from the song Hamoa Beach)

                by jhecht on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 03:45:09 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  and your 'facts' are mostly conjecture (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  poco

                  Especially the part about 'follow the money'.

                  God, that one is hilarious.

                  Signed,

                  White guy with a CPA and a Phd in accounting.

                  •  This entire diary is based on conjecture (0+ / 0-)

                    The difference is I admit my responses are based on conjecture, the diarist refuses to do the same. The bottom line is, when the diarist was confronted with the fact that Marcus Smart had an incident of losing his composure only a few games prior to this incident, he chose to poo-poo the incident and accuse me of being an Uncle Tom. That's what he calls "critical thinking". What's really hilarious is that you agree with him.

                    I'm no philosopher, I am no poet, I'm just trying to help you out - Gomez (from the song Hamoa Beach)

                    by jhecht on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 07:35:08 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

            •  You are making claims too (0+ / 0-)

              And, I would argue that your claims have little merit.

              There is very little money based on whether OSU makes the NCAA basketball tournament or not. There are no home games for ticket sales and it is not like a BCS football bowl game.

              OSU is likely out of the NCAA tournament at this point. If OSU only cared about advancing their team to the tournament, then they would not have dismissed Stevie Clark two weeks ago for urinating out of an open window. (There is a guy with character problems.)

              Their only chance is to win outright the Big 12 championship and Marcus Smart will be back in plenty of time for that. Even before he was suspended, this team was having plenty of problems due partially to the loss of two starting players and what I perceive to be an ineffective (but overpaid) coach.

              Over the last few years, the AD (Mike Holder) has demonstrated that in all of their sports programs, OSU will do the right thing and accept the consequences if they fall short.

            •  You are clearly no business major (0+ / 0-)

              First,

              OSU's bb program's attendance has been adversely affected by the Oklahoma City Thunder's play;

              The 'follow the money' aspect would entail that somehow, someway that Smart's 3 game suspension would adversely affect home attendance BUT ONLY for the 'walk up' aspect of the home attendance since..

              At this point in the season, virtually all of the attendees have already paid for the season tickets.

              In other words, negligible impact on home attendance and its $$$.

              In terms of the NCAA tourney, um....NO.  Individual teams do NOT get a cut of the NCAA $.  They get 'credits' and the conference shares the credits that is earned.  Thus, UNLESS OSU is going to bolt the Big12 - for which there is virtually no chance of it happening and anybody who understands D1 sports would know - the additional revenue from advancing into say the Sweet 16 is negligible as well.

              Another thing is this: a 3-game suspension BEFORE the tournament and before the Big12 conference tournament is little more than a slap on the wrist, at best.  The NCAA looks at the last 10 games (of which 3/4 will come in the tournament) and only maybe 1 of which will be impacted by the 3 game suspension to Smart.

              If anything the punishment outcomes GROSSLY favor Smart than Orr and suggest that Smart did not do anything really that 'wrong'.  

        •  Ah man, apparently you're not not-white enough (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Be Skeptical

          to understand what's happening in this story. Sorry.

          Look, I tried to be reasonable...

          by campionrules on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 02:24:07 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  What color was the chair? (0+ / 0-)

        That information would be critical in determining whether it deserved to be kicked or not.

        /snark

    •  wait... (0+ / 0-)

      I'm sorry, but I am aware of only one incident before this game. And, that was the chair-kicking out of frustration.

      Kicking the chair and reacting to a fan that shouted he was a "piece of crap" is not a "history."

      As an Oklahoma State alum that follows OSU basketball, Marcus Smart is a good student and has never been in any trouble off the court. He is feeling frustrated due to injuries on his team (they lost their big man), a dismissal of one of their guards, and simply bad play.

  •  depends (0+ / 0-)
  •  please change the title (0+ / 0-)

    the n word in your title triggers filters that prevent some people from being able to access the entire Daily Kos site

    Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
    DEMAND CREATES JOBS!!!
    Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights to talk about grief.

    by TrueBlueMajority on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 03:41:22 PM PST

  •  So, Orr is Guilty of Being White? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Be Skeptical

    Nobody around the incident reported hearing "that word", available video doesn't yield "that word", but because the asshole is white he must be guilty?

    Seems kinda like the reasoning some white juries in the South (and perhaps elsewhere) used in the past...

    Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government.

    by The Baculum King on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 06:39:30 PM PST

  •  I saw it happen, when it happened and the first (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    poco

    thing I said to my wife was, "that guy in the stands asked for it." I don't know what he said, but there are few things that cause that reaction.
    Anyway, Smart didn't do much of anything. This kid is in ideal physical condition and if he wanted to, he could have done serious damage. He didn't. He shoved the guy with not even enough force to knock him over. That is hardly a violent attack, more like a physical warning.

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