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Mike Lofgren is a former Capitol Hill Republican staffer who quit in 2011 and wrote The Party Is Over: How Republicans Went Crazy, Democrats Became Useless and the Middle Class Got Shafted. At Moyers & Company, he writes Anatomy of the Deep State. An excerpt:

There is the visible government situated around the Mall in Washington, and then there is another, more shadowy, more indefinable government that is not explained in Civics 101 or observable to tourists at the White House or the Capitol. The former is traditional Washington partisan politics: the tip of the iceberg that a public watching C-SPAN sees daily and which is theoretically controllable via elections. The subsurface part of the iceberg I shall call the Deep State, which operates according to its own compass heading regardless of who is formally in power. […]

Yes, there is another government concealed behind the one that is visible at either end of Pennsylvania Avenue, a hybrid entity of public and private institutions ruling the country according to consistent patterns in season and out, connected to, but only intermittently controlled by, the visible state whose leaders we choose. My analysis of this phenomenon is not an exposé of a secret, conspiratorial cabal; the state within a state is hiding mostly in plain sight, and its operators mainly act in the light of day. Nor can this other government be accurately termed an “establishment.” All complex societies have an establishment, a social network committed to its own enrichment and perpetuation. In terms of its scope, financial resources and sheer global reach, the American hybrid state, the Deep State, is in a class by itself. That said, it is neither omniscient nor invincible. The institution is not so much sinister (although it has highly sinister aspects) as it is relentlessly well entrenched. Far from being invincible, its failures, such as those in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya, are routine enough that it is only the Deep State’s protectiveness towards its higher-ranking personnel that allows them to escape the consequences of their frequent ineptitude.

Mike Lofgren
Mike Lofgren
How did I come to write an analysis of the Deep State, and why am I equipped to write it? As a congressional staff member for 28 years specializing in national security and possessing a top secret security clearance, I was at least on the fringes of the world I am describing, if neither totally in it by virtue of full membership nor of it by psychological disposition. But, like virtually every employed person, I became, to some extent, assimilated into the culture of the institution I worked for, and only by slow degrees, starting before the invasion of Iraq, did I begin fundamentally to question the reasons of state that motivate the people who are, to quote George W. Bush, “the deciders.” […]

The Deep State does not consist of the entire government. It is a hybrid of national security and law enforcement agencies: the Department of Defense, the Department of State, the Department of Homeland Security, the Central Intelligence Agency and the Justice Department. I also include the Department of the Treasury because of its jurisdiction over financial flows, its enforcement of international sanctions and its organic symbiosis with Wall Street. All these agencies are coordinated by the Executive Office of the President via the National Security Council. Certain key areas of the judiciary belong to the Deep State, such as the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, whose actions are mysterious even to most members of Congress. Also included are a handful of vital federal trial courts, such as the Eastern District of Virginia and the Southern District of Manhattan, where sensitive proceedings in national security cases are conducted. The final government component (and possibly last in precedence among the formal branches of government established by the Constitution) is a kind of rump Congress consisting of the congressional leadership and some (but not all) of the members of the defense and intelligence committees. The rest of Congress, normally so fractious and partisan, is mostly only intermittently aware of the Deep State and when required usually submits to a few well-chosen words from the State’s emissaries. […]

[T]he Deep State does not consist only of government agencies. What is euphemistically called “private enterprise” is an integral part of its operations. In a special series in The Washington Post called “Top Secret America,” Dana Priest and William K. Arkin described the scope of the privatized Deep State and the degree to which it has metastasized after the September 11 attacks. There are now 854,000 contract personnel with top-secret clearances—a number greater than that of top-secret-cleared civilian employees of the government. While they work throughout the country and the world, their heavy concentration in and around the Washington suburbs is unmistakable: Since 9/11, 33 facilities for top-secret intelligence have been built or are under construction. Combined, they occupy the floor space of almost three Pentagons—about 17 million square feet. Seventy percent of the intelligence community’s budget goes to paying contracts. And the membrane between government and industry is highly permeable: The Director of National Intelligence, James R. Clapper, is a former executive of Booz Allen Hamilton, one of the government’s largest intelligence contractors. His predecessor as director, Admiral Mike McConnell, is the current vice chairman of the same company; Booz Allen is 99 percent dependent on government business. These contractors now set the political and social tone of Washington, just as they are increasingly setting the direction of the country, but they are doing it quietly, their doings unrecorded in the Congressional Record or the Federal Register, and are rarely subject to congressional hearings. […]


Blast from the Past. At Daily Kos on this date in 2009You and UBS:

Swiss bank accounts. Just the term brings with it a mysterious, dangerous air. A place for shadowy assassins to pick up their pay. International agents collecting on acts of extortion. Dusty hordes of Nazi treasure.
However, Swiss giant UBS has admitted to something just as illegal, and a good deal more tawdry. They have been using their operations in the US to lure wealthy Americans into plopping their millions into UBS accounts, where they can evade taxes.

The U.S. government has been probing UBS with help from sources such as a former UBS banker, Bradley Birkenfeld, who last year pleaded guilty to helping a California real estate mogul evade millions of dollars of taxes. Birkenfeld told investigators that UBS personnel went to elaborate lengths to help U.S. clients stash money in secret Swiss accounts.
UBS is complaining that, shortly after the Bush administration came to town in 2001, they signed a get out of jail free card with the IRS; a contract that authorized UBS to hide their clients' identities as long as UBS promised they would follow the rules. Now UBS is holding to the principled position of no-takey-backseys.

Tweet of the Day:

Arizona pizzeria (@tucsonpizza) reserves the right to kick out lawmakers who voted for LGBT discrimination bill: http://t.co/...
@nickmartin



On today's encore Kagro in the Morning show, it's our Feb. 21, 2013 how. Greg Dworkin had new polls showing the President up, Republicans down, and Rs on the losing end of the sequester, immigration and more. What's in store under the sequester? We reviewed a NYT editorial running down the impact. Also: a mini #GunFAIL roundup; GideonAB on the interesting development of "pre-registration" of scientific studies; Senate paralysis and the endgame on Hagel; and new CA polling  that appears to say bouncing Rs from government has got the state back on the right track.


High Impact Posts. Top Comments. Overnight News Digest.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Have a great weekend everyone! (27+ / 0-)

    “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 08:36:59 PM PST

  •  Kansas (R)s say: Protect Gays from KKK weddings (6+ / 0-)

    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    That's not a misquote.   Have a laugh or two on my state's expense.  

    Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

    by Chris Reeves on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 08:40:47 PM PST

  •  Is this the best they've got? (7+ / 0-)

    I expect more from the Bagger Republicans. I expect them to be carrying misspelled signs that have an incoherent message ("keep your government hands off my Medicare!").

    Slackers!

    Charlie Crist was reportedly accosted yesterday at a book-signing by tea partiers who said he looked "like an AIDS victim" and called him a "commie whore." That, said a local reporter, was "the most printable comment."

    http://www.shark-tank.com/...

    https://twitter.com/...

    “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 08:50:00 PM PST

  •  Americans for th Prosperous pulls out of Alaska (19+ / 0-)

    after Koch Industries lays off a bunch of Alaskans.

    Americans for Prosperity pulls political ads after Koch brothers' Alaska refinery shuts down

    "I guess it took two weeks for the billionaire Koch brothers to finally realize Alaskans don't appreciate them firing 80 Alaska workers and closing a refinery while at the same time funneling over $100,000 to Outside political attack groups for misleading ads against Senator Begich,” said Max Croes, spokesman for the Begich campaign. “Alaskans just aren't going to buy what they're selling."

    "If Wall Street paid a tax on every “game” they run, we would get enough revenue to run the government on." ~ Will Rogers

    by Lefty Coaster on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 09:10:24 PM PST

    •  Don't mess with Mark! (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lefty Coaster, WakeUpNeo, JeffW

      I've known him since he was just getting started.  Told him he was doing good when he was the ONLY candidate that showed up for a left leaning NPO meet and greet.  I think he was 23?  Running for City Assembly then.  Ah how time flies.

      ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

      by Arianna Editrix on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 10:23:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  So does Tucson Pizza deliver to SF? (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, Jeff Y, jan4insight, navajo, JeffW

    Lead your life - don't let your life lead you.

    by lineatus on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 09:20:48 PM PST

  •  We're in deep Kafka now. (8+ / 0-)

    You can't make this stuff up.

    by David54 on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 09:31:07 PM PST

  •  Lofgren Deep State article: required reading for (24+ / 0-)

    anybody wanting to understand and explain US politics, although its least persuasive part is the following bolded lines in its conclusion:

    there is now a deep but as yet inchoate hunger for change. What America lacks is a figure with the serene self-confidence to tell us that the twin idols of national security and corporate power are outworn dogmas that have nothing more to offer us. Thus disenthralled, the people themselves will unravel the Deep State with surprising speed.
    Additional focused diaries are deserved by Lofgren's article, and probably by each of its related articles also posted on Moyers' website:
    •    Full Show: The Deep State Hiding in Plain Sight
    •    Juan Cole on the Vulnerability of the Network
    •    Heidi Boghosian on Mass Surveillance
    •    Danielle Brian on Legalized Corruption
    •    Andrew Bacevich on Washington’s Tacit Consensus
    •    Henry Giroux on Resisting the Neoliberal Revolution
    •    Reactions to Mike Lofgren’s Essay on the Deep State
    •    Tim Wu on the Partisan Sideshow and Silicon Valley
    •  I agree, emorej a Hong Kong (16+ / 0-)

      I agree that Lofgren's article could (and should!) supply the basis for a number of dKos diaries.  And I found myself surprised that Lofgren's suggestion of 'what should happen next' was so weak, compared with the reasoning shown in his article.  

      What America lacks is a figure with the serene self-confidence to tell us that the twin idols of national security and corporate power are outworn dogmas that have nothing more to offer us.
      Lofgren seems to suggest that 'we lack' (and therefore 'we need') some kind of savior-figure to arise spontaneously, without attachment to the power structures of the status quo, and that this spontaneously-arising Thus-Come-One will have the stature and gravitas to communicate to, and generate agreement among, enough people to bring about change.  (Which seems to be the plot of 'The Day the Earth Stood Still' -- the 1950s version, anyway.)

      Lofgren does us a great service in his thoroughness in 'naming the game' of the Deep State's structure and operations, and in pointing out how the machinery of the Deep State is collapsing under its own weight.  And, as I see it (and as they used to say in the 1970s 'Human Potential' schools of psychology), 'in the breakdown lies the breakthrough'.  

      Here's an example, based on Lofgren's article:

      Lofgren mentions last summer's near-miss of the Amash/Conyers bill in which 'civil liberties Democrats' (like Conyers) and Tea Party (and Libertarian-like) Republicans (like Amash) came within seven votes of overturning the Deep-State NSA's violations of the First, Fourth, and Fifth Amendments -- with full-throated support from Jim Sensenbrenner, who acted as a Deep-State 'player' in writing the original bill.  (And you may recall the full-court press waged against the Amash/Conyers bill by the Deep State players (including GOP & Dem leaders) who only managed to defeat the bill by promising that later bills would make the desired correction.)

      This event was seen as a 'breakdown' by the Deep State players, as they scrambled to regain control.  But -- to my eyes, and to others' -- this event was seen as a breakthrough.

      In ancient China, it was commonplace knowledge that the Way of Heaven decreed that a government lost the Mandate of Heaven when it failed to keep the little people content in their daily lot.  And when a government lost the Mandate of Heaven, radical change would soon occur, whether from within or without.  The very fact that Lofgren could write such a lucid 'Name the Game' article about the current conditions of America's Deep State is, imo, and clear indication that the Deep State is already failing.

      •  I fully believe the day of 'great leader' is dead. (9+ / 0-)

        And anytime you get someone in public life for, oh, I'd say a bit more than 50 years now, who actually takes steps to end war and focus on real human rights (not just words) well, they get dead somehow.

        It's an evolutionary movement required of humanity where sufficient numbers volunteer to live according to their conscience. Most of humanity are 'bit players' (in the original Russian sense of 'bit' -- the shopkeeper, farmer, teacher, people just living their daily lives and who keep ordinary life running) and so just follow along with 'conventional wisdom.' Their temperament makes them inherently adverse to rocking the boats, unless pressed by starvation or constant outrages.

        Once 'conventional wisdom' is set by people who aren't going to do bullshit everything decent will follow. The option is: well we're on the route to hell on earth right now, and no leader who can be trusted is going to arise anymore.


        Actual Democrats: the surest, quickest, route to More Democrats. And actually addressing our various emergencies.

        by Jim P on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 11:38:04 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Well, they might arise. But what will happen then (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          GreenMother, CroneWit, Jim P, unfangus

          is: first, an attempt will be made to buy them. Second, if that fails, an attempt will be made to intimidate them. Third, if that fails, an attempt will be made to discredit them. Fourth, if that fails, an attempt will be made to remove them via executive fiat or election. (Sometimes steps 3 and 4 are combined). And fifth, if all those fail, yes, they will get dead somehow.

          These days it rarely requires all five steps to get rid of someone. Why do you think the media was so frustrated that Occupy Wall St had no leaders?

          I tried to go online to find a similar bear head...but when I searched “Big Bear Head” it gave me a San Diego craigslist ad entitled “Big Bear needs some quick head now” and then I just decided to never go on the internet again.--Jenny Lawson

          by SouthernLiberalinMD on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 04:26:07 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  But that was in part, because OWs was an example (4+ / 0-)

            of Leaderless Resistance. They had a decentralized organization, and they knew going in, that any one leader sticking out would be hammered back in with a night stick or in one young Marine's care--A tear gas canister.

            The group had to appear amorphous for that reason, because the powers they were up against were so vast  that it required them to shift like a foundation of sand.

            Sometimes the enemy is so big and powerful that meeting it head on is tactically stupid.

            Watching OWs unfold as it did was like watching a Kraken trying to swallow all the plankton at once.

            "It were a thousand times better for the land if all Witches, but especially the blessing Witch, might suffer death." qtd by Ehrenreich & English. For Her Own Good, Two Centuries of Expert's Advice to Women pp 40

            by GreenMother on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 05:19:49 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I totally agree. That's kind of what I meant. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              GreenMother

              I tried to go online to find a similar bear head...but when I searched “Big Bear Head” it gave me a San Diego craigslist ad entitled “Big Bear needs some quick head now” and then I just decided to never go on the internet again.--Jenny Lawson

              by SouthernLiberalinMD on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 09:54:57 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  In general I agree, but I also disagree a bit (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        CroneWit, unfangus

        with both you and Jim, below; I think what Lofgren is looking for may be more Edward Snowden types. Snowden is not precisely a leader in the traditional MLK style of the word; certainly not in the Winston Churchill style of the word. But he's a clear voice that rises above the muddle of messaging and counters it. There needs to be more of that. That's why the parts of the State we can see are so obsessed with messaging and controlling the story.

        I tried to go online to find a similar bear head...but when I searched “Big Bear Head” it gave me a San Diego craigslist ad entitled “Big Bear needs some quick head now” and then I just decided to never go on the internet again.--Jenny Lawson

        by SouthernLiberalinMD on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 04:30:16 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  I do agree, the least persuasive, and kind of a.. (8+ / 0-)

      ..let down on that last bit after turning things inside out with spot on observations and analysis. You can tell he's seen a lot go down and knows he stuff

       Just before that final conclusion is this paragraph where he points out some important steps of what needs doing so well..

      As the United States confronts its future after experiencing two failed wars, a precarious economy and $17 trillion in accumulated debt, the national punditry has split into two camps. The first, the declinists, sees a broken, dysfunctional political system incapable of reform and an economy soon to be overtaken by China. The second, the reformers, offers a profusion of nostrums to turn the nation around: public financing of elections to sever the artery of money between the corporate components of the Deep State and financially dependent elected officials, government “insourcing” to reverse the tide of outsourcing of government functions and the conflicts of interest that it creates, a tax policy that values human labor over financial manipulation and a trade policy that favors exporting manufactured goods over exporting investment capital.
      ..which Lofgren follows with:
      All of that is necessary, but not sufficient. The Snowden revelations (the impact of which have been surprisingly strong), the derailed drive for military intervention in Syria and a fractious Congress, whose dysfunction has begun to be a serious inconvenience to the Deep State, show that there is now a deep but as yet inchoate hunger for change. What America lacks is a figure with the serene self-confidence to tell us that the twin idols of national security and corporate power are outworn dogmas that have nothing more to offer us. Thus disenthralled, the people themselves will unravel the Deep State with surprising speed.
      Yes Snowden with the reporting by Glen Greenwald did expose a menace we all needed to learn.

      But imo a single figure won't cut it

      We should start with what Lofgren said in the second to last paragraph; not the 'declinists - which in my opinion describe the austerity minded republicans (deficit obsession, taxcuts for the rich and slashing for the working folketc.), but the reformers ideas of change which are the Dems who are for this kind of change:

      The second, the reformers, offers a profusion of nostrums to turn the nation around: public financing of elections to sever the artery of money between the corporate components of the Deep State and financially dependent elected officials, government “insourcing” to reverse the tide of outsourcing of government functions and the conflicts of interest that it creates, a tax policy that values human labor over financial manipulation and a trade policy that favors exporting manufactured goods over exporting investment capital
      We need us good Dems holding it in solidarity - together - all of us

       - imo

      Thx MB

    •  Need to add more insider actors to insider namers (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ChemBob, GreenMother, unfangus, phillies

      For the dot-connections to be explained and named by insiders like Lofgren is an important step, because outsiders' explaining and naming them have existed for many decades, but are not believed by enough people.

      Another important step is to elect into insider roles more people able and willing to act.  Nobody has the ability to do everything, but single-issue experts can be very useful.  For example, in the Senate:

      Liz Warren does not need to be an expert on the surveillance state in order to highlight and start pressuring the bankster impunity that is a key element of the present system.

      Ron Wyden and Mark Udall, even if not leaders in confronting banksters, can confront surveillance state overreaching if we elect more Senators able and willing to support them, like civil liberties expert Senate candidate Shenna Bellows in Maine.

  •  Thanks for 'Anatomy of the Deep State' link (13+ / 0-)

    What an excellent analysis!  Thank you for bringing it to my attention.

  •  God, if I was in Tucson I'd order more pizzas from (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jeff Y, JeffW, roadbear, RiveroftheWest

    that bunch than they could handle.

    And my wife would love it.

    "The soil under the grass is dreaming of a young forest, and under the pavement the soil is dreaming of grass."--Wendell Berry

    by Wildthumb on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 09:57:38 PM PST

  •  Something more to mull over... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RiveroftheWest, Eric Nelson

    Poverty is not an accident. Like slavery and apartheid, it is man-made and can be removed by the actions of human beings. —Nelson Mandela

    by kaliope on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 09:59:05 PM PST

  •  Must-read essay by Mr. Lofgren (7+ / 0-)

    Thanks, MB.




    Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

    by DeadHead on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 10:09:25 PM PST

  •  Democrats need to pay attention and fight back (8+ / 0-)

    hard against this crap every time it pops up. If we ignore it, Republicans will disenfranchise every Democratic voting block that they can find.

    Republicans in Ohio are once again trying to pass hideous voter suppression laws.

    Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

    “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 10:16:01 PM PST

  •  Privatize It said RR in 1980 (7+ / 0-)

    And he did.  Talk to any military person and they can fill your ears with all sorts of stuff about B-A and Haliburton.  Not fit for anyone under 30 though....too ugly.

    ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

    by Arianna Editrix on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 10:25:08 PM PST

  •  Help Needed Please! (0+ / 0-)

    I'm a newbie here and I realize I may not understand all the ins and outs but I'm no stranger to the rough and tumble of word fights.  However, I can't HR, don't want the ability actually, though I feel we have a troll in our midst.  Who do I talk to please?

    ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

    by Arianna Editrix on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 10:26:47 PM PST

    •  Why not just post a comment outing the troll? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DeadHead

      And is the troll really doing that much damage that steps need to be taken?

    •  You can contact General Inquiries (0+ / 0-)

      and click on Community Issues. Or f you're pretty positive, just out them. Most trolls don't last very long.

      "If Wall Street paid a tax on every “game” they run, we would get enough revenue to run the government on." ~ Will Rogers

      by Lefty Coaster on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 10:59:55 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I did it with panache I hope (0+ / 0-)

        Or at least perplexed the crap out of them! lol  It's just it's on a diary about a hugely hot button issue (racism) and the person posting has "been a member since 2013" but has only posted 5 times and has no diaries?

        I guess if someone starts to get upset by the troll 'splaining, then I'll get out the XXS coconuts and imitate hoofbeats. ;)

        ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

        by Arianna Editrix on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 11:11:12 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  You mean... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          marsanges

          This comment, correct?

          If so, it's probably a good thing you can't HR right now, because if you had used one on that comment, it wouldn't have been justified, I don't think.

          HRs aren't for disagreement. Calling "troll," while applicable sometimes, should be done with caution, and not simply because the view is unpopular.

          None of what I just said should be taken as a defense or endorsement of the above-linked comment, by the way.

          Also, the number of diaries written by a person isn't always a reliable measure of a person's participation here. A lot of people just aren't comfortable writing them for whatever reason.




          Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

          by DeadHead on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 11:43:40 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Not everyone writes diaries (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            DeadHead

            I get that part.  But to sit at a site for a year and say almost (5 comments shown in profile) nothing?  Looks like a lurker to me is all.  Thanks for your advice and counsel.

            ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

            by Arianna Editrix on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 01:47:22 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  No, that's a valid observation, for sure... (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              viral

              There's been instances of what are sometimes referred to as "sleeper trolls," people who registered YEARS ago, who finally come out of lurk mode and start doing strange things.

              Still, like diary-writing, there are people who shy away from even commenting, doing so only very rarely.

              So while those characteristics are indeed things to look at when evaluating questionable behavior, they should be part of the assessment, not the entire basis for it, is all I'm saying.




              Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

              by DeadHead on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 03:40:04 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

    •  If the person made a comment that... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      viral

      violates site rules and should be hidden, but has yet to be, you should post a link to it so that others who are able to HR can evaluate it and HR, if necessary.




      Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

      by DeadHead on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 11:25:28 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I think this is the one in question (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DeadHead

        "Go well through life"-Me (As far as I know)
        This message will self-destruct upon arrival in the NSA archives in Utah.

        by MTmofo on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 11:37:08 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yep, that was my guess... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MTmofo

          Which I offered above to her as well, this comment of yours unbeknownst to me at the time.

          I'm a lazy page refresher, what can I say? ;)




          Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

          by DeadHead on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 12:43:14 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  It's 45 minutes later. Join the club. :) n/t (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            DeadHead

            "Go well through life"-Me (As far as I know)
            This message will self-destruct upon arrival in the NSA archives in Utah.

            by MTmofo on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 01:26:03 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Sorry, lazier page refresher here (0+ / 0-)

              I didn't see it as a disagreement, more an argument for the "status quo" and continuing the types of actions represented by the medical investigator.  Also, it seemed to cast aspersions on the person making the complaint to the MI in that it intimated he was only after $$ not really complaining about the lack of medical care provided to his mother.  I came to this conclusion because the State of TN fired the MI for his remarks citing racism.

              ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

              by Arianna Editrix on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 01:45:52 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

  •  Seems the French Revolution (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Floande, Superpole

    was largely a failure.

    For decades it has been commonly accepted in Turkish politics of the constant meddling in the affairs of state by a deep state. With the Snowden revelations normalizing shining lights where lights have been far too few, maybe we can finally drag these roaches kicking and screaming into the light.

    But will the American people care enough to break their comfortable, predictable, safe status quo? Always a difficult question to answer. I just hope that they are exposed enough that not being able to safeguard their autonomy with public ignorance and apathy any more will have a significantly positive impact.

    •  NOPE (0+ / 0-)
      But will the American people care enough to break their comfortable, predictable, safe status quo? Always a difficult question to answer.
      this is totally not difficult to answer, it's NO.

      just look at what is happening in the Ukraine right now-- the people are being shot at and killed by the pigs working for the corrupt state.

      Change is hard and it comes with costs. as long as the state here provides just enough of a safety net, i.e. SNAP, etc. that keep the people from being totally ravaged by our dog-eat-dog capitalist system, we're not going to see the potential for people getting into the streets en masse like the Ukraine.

      with the "battle" regarding min wage- even raising it to a feeble $10.10 an hour going nowhere in an election year-- we'll see how pissed off the people are going to get.

      "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

      by Superpole on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 03:20:03 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The Deep State and Trade Agreements (7+ / 0-)

    As Matt Stoller documents, it was 47 years ago that George Ball (part of the 'liberal' establishment, which included the Rockefellers, and one of those permanent fixtures in DC politics, later to head Lehman Bros.) said to a gathering of Senators and Representatives [sic]:

    "For the widespread development of the multinational corporation is one of our major accomplishments in the years since the war [WWII, gosh we've had so many--jp], ...

    ...But to fulfill its full potential the multinational corporation must be able to operate with little regard for national boundaries - or, in other words, for restrictions imposed by individual national governments.

    To achieve such a free trading environment we must do far more than merely reduce or eliminate tariffs. We must move in the direction of common fiscal concepts, a common monetary policy, and common ideas of commercial responsibility. Already the economically advanced nations have made some progress in all of these areas through such agencies as the OECD and the committees it has sponsored, the Group of Ten, and the IMF, but we still have a long way to go. In my view, we could steer a faster and more direct course… by agreeing that what we seek at the end of the voyage is the full realization of the benefits of a world economy.

    Implied in this, of course, is a considerable erosion of the rigid concepts of national sovereignty, but that erosion is taking place every day as national economies grow increasingly interdependent, and I think it desirable that this process be consciously continued. ...

    ...it seems beyond question that modern business - sustained and reinforced by modern technology - has outgrown the constrictive limits of the antiquated political structures in which most of the world is organized, and that itself is a political fact which cannot be ignored. For the explosion of business beyond national borders will tend to create needs and pressures that can help alter political structures to fit the requirements of modern man far more adequately than the present crazy quilt of small national states. And meanwhile, commercial, monetary, and antitrust policies - and even the domiciliary supervision of earth-straddling corporations - will have to be increasingly entrusted to supranational institutions….

    I picked up this link from a WashingtonsBlog post, wherein he adds more detail:
    After their opening statements, Ball and [David, head of Chase] Rockefeller go on on to talk about how European states need to be wedged into a common monetary union with our trade efforts and that Latin America needs to be managed into prosperity by the US and Africa by Europe. Through such efforts, they thought that the US could put together a global economy over the next thirty years. Thirty years later was 1997, which was exactly when NAFTA was being implemented
    They imagined that corporate world governance (although not precisely a One World Government) would be able to allocate the world's resources wisely and avoid war, since the thinking of the day was that nation states are the root of war. [Actually it's collective sleep-walking and widespread suppression of conscience at the root, but that's another post.]

    If you are surprised to see 'Rockefeller' and 'liberal' put together, it is worthwhile to read** about how the Rockefeller's first 'Christianized' the US's Native American population (and incidentally got access to resources on the way to 'saving their souls') and then Nelson lead the way to doing the same thing to Central & South Americans indigenous populations. They earned the title liberal because, unlike the 'fundamentalists' of the 1920s and '30s, who believed that shouting the Bible at these 'primitives' was sufficient to raise them out of savagery and into salvation, the Rockefellers held the 'liberal' view that providing health-care and, of course, industry would be the sure route.

    Basically, you look at what we have now, and you look at the groundwork done by Ball and Rockefeller, prime figures in the "Deep State," and TPP, NAFTA, and the general assault on national sovereignty makes a lot of sense.

    Of course, they didn't realize that people obsessed with concentrating wealth and power either become socio- and psychopaths, or gladly play along for their own advantage.

    ======
    **A review of Thy will be done: the conquest of the Amazon.
    Nelson Rockefeller and evangelism in the age of oil


    Actual Democrats: the surest, quickest, route to More Democrats. And actually addressing our various emergencies.

    by Jim P on Fri Feb 21, 2014 at 11:25:59 PM PST

    •  Helloooooooo? NAFTA (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ChemBob

      NAFTA got rid of some of those "pesky" tariffs. way to go President Clinton!! and Gore lobbied hard for passage of NAFTA.

      "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

      by Superpole on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 03:13:24 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Yeah. That's why you get people like Jay (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jim P

      Rockefeller disgusted with industry. For people like him, finding out that industry is corrupt and corrupting to that extent is probably like me finding out how wrong I was to vote for Bill Clinton twice. Oops!

      I tried to go online to find a similar bear head...but when I searched “Big Bear Head” it gave me a San Diego craigslist ad entitled “Big Bear needs some quick head now” and then I just decided to never go on the internet again.--Jenny Lawson

      by SouthernLiberalinMD on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 04:32:51 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Wow, I had not seen the Ball quotes before. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      northerntier, Jim P

      This really serves to clarify things and I'm fascinated by how this destruction of "antiquated political structures," such as our Constitution has been gradually but successfully kept on track for 50 years, by a procession of different people.

      Why would already successful grown men even want to spend their time doing such a thing? How would one cope psychologically with the immorality of the things that had to be done?

      I wish there were a Hell that they could all rot in.

    •  Liberal but not progressive (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      grollen

      Rockefeller didn't respect the Native American population themselves. He thought he had to change them.

      he might have been willing to trade providing health care for their cooperation with his industrial policies but he didn't give them a lot of options.

      •  The point of the post. The Big Daddy (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        grollen

        Rockefeller (forgot his name at the moment) and his sons considered themselves religious people. They imagined they were doing good all around, and part of good was material wealth. But that's the sort of 'religious' which is ultimately based on vanity and greed.

        It was not just the Rockefellers who looked at life that way. Almost of these people consider themselves, as one banker put it just last year, as 'we're doing god's work.'

        They honestly tell themselves that.


        Actual Democrats: the surest, quickest, route to More Democrats. And actually addressing our various emergencies.

        by Jim P on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 09:53:09 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  He did not respect them as equal humans (0+ / 0-)
          antiquated political structures
          Human beings are obsolete now. It's time for the superior, powerful self-perpetuating being known as the international corporation to reign. They can, and therefore they should.

          Government and laws are the agreement we all make to secure everyone's freedom.

          by Simplify on Sun Feb 23, 2014 at 04:31:23 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  To the pragmatic, lesser-of-two (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ChemBob, northerntier

    -evil incrementalists among us here, I would posit the following for consideration:

    While it most certainly would be naive and foolhardy to bank on a single, individual 'savior' to extricate us all from the morass of the Deep State, it would be even more foolhardy to actively abet the election of an individual whose entire history bespeaks an affinity with, and active support for, that Deep State which Mike Lofgren so insightfully describes.

    We activists have a profound choice to make here: Do we meekly acquiesce to the inevitability meme, or do we marshal all our resources to identify and promote the presidential candidacy of someone who, at the very least, is not deeply tied to the various powerful figures who have so despoiled the nation? Would not that latter individual more successfully inspire the populace to take their fates in their own hands and wrest power back from those who strive to make us powerless?

    In 2006 Obama explicitly ruled out a 2008 run for president and declared he would remain in the senate until his term expired in 2010. Encouraging Elizabeth Warren to run in 2016 is the right thing to do.

    by WisePiper on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 01:14:01 AM PST

    •  Well, that would probably be likely, (0+ / 0-)

      but getting said person elected would be far less likely, unfortunately. I think too many of us thought that Obama would be the person to stand up to the Deep State. When he began appointing corporate financial jackasses to positions of power, I knew we were wrong.

  •  very interesting article (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ChemBob

    I don't think a Messiah-figure will turn up to save us from the Deep State, what might humble it though is the not unlikely prospect of the US$ eventually losing its present status as the world's reserve currency...

    We're shocked by a naked nipple, but not by naked aggression.

    by Lepanto on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 01:28:21 AM PST

  •  So it's as I've Been Pointing Out Here (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ChemBob

    A totally corrupt statist system. a system that more or less has nothing to do with we the people-- and is of zero benefit to us.

    the author, from what I read, says nothing about certain corporations-- particularly those related to "defense" being part of the deep state-- statist system.

    "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

    by Superpole on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 03:07:59 AM PST

  •  a figure with the serene self-confidence (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    FrY10cK, SouthernLiberalinMD

    Unfortunately Walter Cronkite passed away.

    "If you pour some music on whatever's wrong, it'll sure help out." Levon Helm

    by BOHICA on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 03:29:03 AM PST

  •  Naivite (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    starduster

    In his first term Obama complained that trying to change government was much like turning an ocean liner; he was a bit naive about how deep the resistance to change went.

    But to some extent we contribute to the problem. He imprsoves a thousand environmental regulations and we make major press about the ones missed. He avoids wars in Syria and Iran, and we bitch about small details.

    Progressives are perfectionists, and that is good. But at some point we need to attach the real problem of government structure (which I sometimes think of as "rule by the backroom boys") and be grateful for any small progress we make in revealing their nature. Five years ago I didn't carry lists of Koch brothers' products with me. I'd bet they prefer I didn't know them so well, either.

  •  Deep State is a term applied to Turkey, Pakistan (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson

    I'm assuming Lofgren isn't trying to pass off decades of parlance as his coining an original phrase.

    The Turkish reference has its own Wiki

    This piece on Pakistan is but one of MANY  on that country's deep state

    And while I didn't call it such at the time A 2007 diary on the ISI describes its deep state role in Pakistan - a very self-destructive one as far as Pakistan is concerned.

    After one exchange in the comments I tossed out this line:

    Were I to apply the same model to an analysis of American foreign policy it would be swiftly laughed away.

    But that was 2007. And no one is laughing now.

  •  Can someone please embed this video? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson

    http://m.youtube.com/...

    It's a great song. Listen now. Thank me later.

    "Call you home" by Kelvin jones.

    LYRICS
    "You got those eyes (that) stare into my soul
    You get that smile when I'm giving you my all
    You're the brighter side of things
    You're the lighter side of life
    And all the joy that you bring
    Is why I need you in my life..."

    https://www.twitter.com/...

    •  Tech savvy brothers & sisters help me out, please. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Eric Nelson
      •  Here try this, it works (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        We Won

        You have to add http: into the embed code, (the embed code which you grab by right clicking on the video itself and choosing 'embed code')

        For some reason You Tube is leaving it out the necessary http: part of the embed code so you have to add it in

        so
        into this embed code: <iframe width="640" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/immRW4O0ECM?feature=player_detailpage" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> , which is the code that right clicking and selecting will get you

        ..place http: between the src=" and the//www.

         then it should embed

        Also too; On this video embed I cut the size of the video down.

        For comments you can cut down the size from: width="640" height="360" to the size:  width="420" height="260"  

        That way the video that is too large can be reduced to fit into a comment without slicing off the right half.

        good luck..

        Nice music too :)
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        P.S. You can also search the tag embedding You Tube videos or something, I've seen some Kossacks  have wrttien up on it  too

  •  Juan Cole's critique of Lofgren Deep State article (0+ / 0-)

    (posted at this URL).

    Nice sound-bite:

    If absolute power corrupts absolutely, invisible power corrupts invisibly.
    Key takeaway:
    If the Deep State is not monolithic but divided over policy,  and if it is in fact much more responsive to the exercise of public political power than the author admits [both of which Cole illustrates through examples], then it is vulnerable to a vigilant public.
    •  Public political power? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ChemBob

      Haven't gone to the link yet--does Cole mean elections? B/c, if so, color me skeptical.

      Going to the link now.

      I tried to go online to find a similar bear head...but when I searched “Big Bear Head” it gave me a San Diego craigslist ad entitled “Big Bear needs some quick head now” and then I just decided to never go on the internet again.--Jenny Lawson

      by SouthernLiberalinMD on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 04:33:53 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  OK, well, his point about overstating power (0+ / 0-)

      is to some extent well taken, but he's awfully vague about what he means by "public political power" and what actions the "vigilant public" are supposed to take.

      I tried to go online to find a similar bear head...but when I searched “Big Bear Head” it gave me a San Diego craigslist ad entitled “Big Bear needs some quick head now” and then I just decided to never go on the internet again.--Jenny Lawson

      by SouthernLiberalinMD on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 04:36:22 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thank God Mike Lofgren is talking about this (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ChemBob, bygorry, northerntier, Just Bob

    When I talk about it people call me a conspiracy theorist, possibly a lunatic, and maybe a racist too.

    I tried to go online to find a similar bear head...but when I searched “Big Bear Head” it gave me a San Diego craigslist ad entitled “Big Bear needs some quick head now” and then I just decided to never go on the internet again.--Jenny Lawson

    by SouthernLiberalinMD on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 04:22:26 AM PST

  •  Heidi Boghosian on Lofgren Deep State article (4+ / 0-)

    (posted at this URL).

    Persuasively concludes:

    Mobilizing resistance, with creativity and persistence, comes next.
    ... although I am not hugely impressed with the political significance of the following (even though its nice and fun to learn):
    “privacy protection” devices and garments (raising over $40,000 in a Kickstarter campaign), including a metallized fabric case to shield cellular phones from monitoring.

    More important, it is difficult to be optimistic based merely on her summary that:

    Countless others are taking bold and courageous stances to challenge the Deep State in the streets, in courts and online.
    For all of the neutering of formal democracy, I think electing more representatives able and willing to explain, name and confront the Deep State is crucial.  The Snowden disclosures have opened a crack in the 'Matrix', and also in the political armor of many senior politicians. This is why I post so many comments urging Kossacks to support ACLU-veteran Shenna Bellows in taking on the popular but surveillance-tarred incumbent Senator Susan Collins in Obama-supporting Maine.
  •  Danielle Brian on Lofgren art: legalize corruption (0+ / 0-)

    (posted at this URL)

    emphasizes the key point that

    a lot of this corruption (the revolving doors, lobbying activities and campaign contributions, for instance) is legal.
  •  Tim Wu critique of Lofgren Deep State article (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Superskepticalman, bygorry

    (posted in this URL)

    Emphasizes, more than Lofgren, the industrial elements of the Deep State:

    national security or law enforcement... are the parts of the government that wield the most terrifying powers, particularly overseas. But anyone who has worked for other parts of government knows that they too operate under the radar screen. And here, in the real business of government, we find that parties are often less relevant than are industry loyalties; instead of really being a Democrat or Republican, one is more accurately loyal to the cable industry, big oil, Hollywood and so on.
    Thinks Lofgren is hasty in concluding Silicon Valley has already become a full player in the Deep State:
    Silicon Valley ... is newer to Washington and has not yet developed ties as strong as, say, the defense industry, Hollywood or the incumbent telecommunications industries ... It is not a business that, at least yet, depends on Washington to guarantee profit or protect it from competition. The harder question is whether it’s only a matter of time.
  •  Henry Giroux critique of Lofgren article and (0+ / 0-)

    of "more and better Democrats"--type strategies.

    (posted at this URL)

    there is the central question, how does the Deep State function to encourage particular types of individualistic, competitive, acquisitive and entrepreneurial behavior in its citizens?
    The biggest problem facing the US may not be its repressive institutions, modes of governance and the militarization of everyday life, but the interiority of neoliberal nihilism, the hatred of democratic relations and the embrace of a culture of cruelty.
    if we are going to change what Lofgren calls the Deep State, it is necessary to think in terms of an alternative that does not mimic its ideologies, institutions, governing structures and power relations...

    Democracy is on life support in the US and working within the system to change it is a dead end, except for gaining short-term reforms. The struggle for a substantive democracy needs more, and the American people expect more.

  •  And this Deep State does not like Edward Snowden (0+ / 0-)

    or Julian Assange.
    or Mike Kiriakou.
    or any dissent whatsoever.

    It certainly couldn't care less about the Bill of Rights.
    "Rights are for schmucks; government has powers."

    My idea of the ideal GOP speech invariably involves negligent intoxication together with breathing helium for that special vocal nuance.

    by Superskepticalman on Sat Feb 22, 2014 at 05:16:28 AM PST

  •  Bacevich on Lofgren Deep State article is (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bygorry

    less tightly reasoned and less clearly articulated than the usual Bacevich article.

    (posted at this URL).

    The most distinctive part of his somewhat meandering article, emphasizing the "climate of opinion", is his assertion that social liberalism has been irreversibly integrated into the "freedoms" that neoliberalism asserts that it is protecting.

  •  The Occupy Movement was a step in the right direct (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson

    ion. They could see how Wall Street controlled our finances for their own sake. No wonder they were a threat to the powers of government. They demanded accountability and transparency. We still need those things.

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