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Maria Sutton, a Global Policy Analyst at the Electronic Foundation of The Huffington Post warns us of the dangers to our freedoms lurking in the secret trade agreement being negotiated between 12 pacific nations, known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership, in her important article, What the Top-Secret TPP Talks Mean for the Future of the Internet and Democracy.

Sutton's theory is that TPP, seems like an international version of the ALEC organization which gives powerful corporate lobbyist a secret process, out of sight, and beyond the influence of the public, so they can "capture the democratic process from the public."  

Maria Sutton complains that secrecy is so tight we only have an occasional glimpse of the topics being discuss, from occasional leaks. Only after the agreement has been reached it is presented to the public. Sutton warns us that unless there is plenty of time for public participation and revisions, which do not seem to be planned in this process, we are vulnerable to have major multinational corporations "capture the democratic process from the public."  

Sutton warns that one of the "most alarming" leaks about the TPP has to do with "extreme copyright enforcement provisions that could lead to users getting censored, fined, and even jailed over completely reasonable activities such as remixing and sharing content for non-commercial purposes." Sutton uses the Canadia's more progressive "notice and notice" copyright law as an example of how a nation would have to replace their domestic law with the more draconian "notice and take down," system corporate lobbyists have passed in other countries.


It included copyright lengths that would last over 140 years, increasingly locking up our culture and making it illegal to access and remix. It revealed some countries' proposals on digital rights management (DRM), which are restrictions on devices and content so manufacturers can control what users can do even after they've bought them. It also had laws that would force Internet service providers and online services to spy on and police their users for copyright infringement. Under such policies, users can have their content removed or blocked, or even have their accounts suspended without so much a judge determining whether what they've done was illegal.
If this trade agreement is reached, passed, and signed, it overrides any nation's local laws and requires signatory countries to revise our domestic laws to be consistent with the international treaty. "While the public is completely denied access to the draft agreement, copyright lobbyists can influence its text and even see the draft language by participating in special advisory committees."
In 2012, Canada passed its latest copyright reform bill, the Copyright Modernization Act (Bill C-11). While it had some glaring issues, some aspects of this bill were very fair and balanced to Internet users. Notably, it contained a law to ensure that Canadians would not have their creative works taken down or their identity disclosed to copyright holders without a judge overseeing the process. It's a system called notice-and-notice. It means that a copyright holder sends a notice to an Internet service provider or website that a certain user is engaged in infringing activity, and then the ISP or the online service sends along a notice on to the user. Studies have shown that it is a very effective system to discourage copyright infringement online. Unfortunately, this system is still a legal anomaly in the world.

In other countries, if ISPs and websites get a notice from a copyright holder, they are obligated to remove users' works or shut down their accounts to ensure that they won't be held legally liable for their users' activities. This is called notice-and-takedown, and this system has continued to force millions of URLs, videos, photos, and other creative works to be censored from the Internet, whether or not it was actually illegal. The United States, along with other countries that already have it, are pushing for the more restrictive notice-and-takedown system in TPP. Based upon the leak of the draft last year, we found that Canada, along with other nations, is instead pushing for language that would allow them to continue with the notice-and-notice system.

Since by the "traditions" of negotiating international law" all negotiations are kept secret our only hope of maintain our democratic rights of public participation is to keep alert, and be prepared to demand transparent processes to allow the public plenty of time and opportunity to learn what this trade agreement contains, with public hearing that allow us the opportunity to make changes.

Sutton has convinced me this is an important issue and to the extent her descriptions of this process, with corporate lobbyists having access to the drafts and the ability to propose the exact language they prefer by being on special advisory committees, this does not sound like the best democratic process by which to negotiate these kinds of treaties.

My only criticism of this article is that is leaves feeling alarmed and unsettled without a sense of any action steps I could take except for perhaps writing my congresspeople not to pass this treaty too quickly. She's convinced me that the benefit of the doubt goes to opposing it until convinced it is good. But writing congress to oppose a treaty before we know for sure what it contains would be an awkward position to be in.

Apparently, the U.S. already has the draconian "notice and take down law." What happens if we write articles describing the insidious dealing of the Koch brothers passed on their brochures and their aggressive lawyers send letters to Google, or internet providers, and Daily Kos that we are copyright violators and demanding our accounts be shut down?

Could the NSA use the same tactic to shut down an investigative journalist like Marcy Wheeler, or our own Bobswern.  Or really nearly any "inconvenient blogger" here. How would you even fight back if your internet account is shut down, with our "notice and take down law.?  Wouldn't this be a violation of due process? Is that section of our constitution even have any meaning any more, or have we inadvertently overridden it?

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Comment Preferences

  •  Ownership Has Been Building One World Government (29+ / 0-)

    almost exactly as long as their party has been warning that the liberals were doing so.

    Yeah seems all the reports about TPP point out that it essentially ends national sovereignty and democracy in any number of very fundamental ways.

    I don't do internet publishing but I'm not exactly sure what the real meaning of "take down" law is. There is no public square on the Internet, as far as I can tell it's all private property, and its owners are free to censor the living shit out of us all, make us take down anything they want, all the time. I see content disappearing all the time from Youtube for example.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 07:23:08 PM PDT

    •  Yes, I'm getting a bad feeling about this. (24+ / 0-)

      How could you even get by without an internet account, to prove you were innocent. Which is basically what the notify and take down law is - guilty until proven innocent.

      There appears to be no burden of credibility accept having a lawyer notify the ISP that the complainer considers the alleged offender to be guilty. To avoid liability the ISP has to take down the material and freeze the account.

      Humor Alert! No statement from this UID is intended to be true, including this one. Intended for recreational purposes only. Unauthorized interpretations may lead to unexpected results. This waiver void where prohibited. Artistic License - 420420

      by HoundDog on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 07:29:48 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I read "None Dare Call It a Conspiracy" a few (10+ / 0-)

      years ago.

      A gift from a friend, it's a Bircher book from the late 50s, I think.

      Anyway, the "Communism" was such a naked projection of corporate power that it freaked me out. It read like history of the corporate power and personhood movement that has played out over the entirety of my lifetime - I got my start in 1973 also.

      Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

      by k9disc on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 09:22:36 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I do not think it is CT to say; (4+ / 0-)

        That the world looks increasingly more like the one most feared by the CTers.

        No, there is not a 12 man panel of Jewish bankers, but there are little small clubs that yield unworldly power and they are totally secret and anonymous - and answers to no one.

        And, I don't think it's all that complex. All we are seeing is runaway capitalism, now into corporate protectionism. Even Adam Smith and the boys knew that capitalism needed strong regulations, anti-trust, anti-collusion, price-fixing, unions, wage regulations. OSHA, all that.

        And each one is being chipped into the history pile. The anti-trust division of DOJ couldn't do anything to Microsoft, pretty much enough said.

        Blessed are the peacemakers, the poor, the meek and the sick: The "party of Jesus" wouldn't invite him to their convention - fearing his "platform."

        by 4CasandChlo on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 11:39:43 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I do believe that there are bankers behind (3+ / 0-)

          What is going on. Especially the Rotheschilds, the Chase heirs and others.
          Plus the CFR, TLC, Bilderberg group to name a few.  Plus the EU and IMF have been pushing austerity on many countries.
          And NATO has been blowing up a lot of countries and destroying their infrastructure. Is population control still CT?  
          When does all the facts coming together make it not CT?  
          IMO, this has been in the works for over 100 years.
          Look at thethrivemovement website and see the info there coming true.
          Plus Bush Sr. did say the NWO in his SOFU address.
          Either eat, if the TPP passes, we are screwed unless we find a way to push back at what they are doing to us and the rest of the world.

          "Americans don't understand that terrorists cannot take away habeas corpus, the Bill of Rights, or the Constitution. Terrorists are not anything like the threat that we face from our own government in the name of fighting terrorism."

          by snoopydawg on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 12:29:53 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  The TPP is shaping up to be NAFTA on steroids (31+ / 0-)

    Obama and Hillary both support it;

    Why almost everyone hates the trade deal Obama’s negotiating in Japan

    In October 2011, she wrote an essay in Foreign Policy titled, "America's Pacific Century." It provided an in-depth walkthrough of the Obama administration's planned pivot. On the Trans-Pacific Partnership, she wrote:

    We believe trade agreements need to include strong protections for workers, the environment, intellectual property, and innovation. They should also promote the free flow of information technology and the spread of green technology, as well as the coherence of our regulatory system and the efficiency of supply chains. Ultimately, our progress will be measured by the quality of people's lives -- whether men and women can work in dignity, earn a decent wage, raise healthy families, educate their children, and take hold of the opportunities to improve their own and the next generation's fortunes. Our hope is that a TPP agreement with high standards can serve as a benchmark for future agreements -- and grow to serve as a platform for broader regional interaction and eventually a free trade area of the Asia-Pacific.

    The Repugs support it too;

    Trans-Pacific Partnership: The biggest trade deal you’ve never heard of

    President Barack Obama has pledged to double U.S. exports as a core policy goal, and the Democratic platform lists the TPP as a “historic high-standard agreement” that will help accomplish this. The GOP platform pledges that “a Republican President will complete negotiations for a Trans-Pacific Partnership to open rapidly developing Asian markets to U.S. products.” Both party leaders argue that exports are one key to creating high-quality American jobs.
    Certainly the copyright issue is huge and thank you for bringing it up.  Unfortunately the TPP will happen unless...other countries oppose it.

    I guess we should trust the "powers to be".

    Daily Kos an oasis of truth. Truth that leads to action.

    by Shockwave on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 07:39:00 PM PDT

    •  How about a "Democratic Sovereignty Agreement" (18+ / 0-)

      to preempt TPP's preemption of the world's sovereign nation-states?
      Perhaps Elizabeth Warren might sponsor one?

      Some dramatic re-affirmation of the right of the USA (and all other nations)  to democratically decide, and change if needed, a whole slew of issues (tax regulations, copyright laws, zoning laws, etc. ... ) that should absolutely never be handed over to be decided by a secret corporate cabal!

      We need more open treaties, openly arrived at.
      We do not need to make justice even more remote and pro-corporate, less transparent and more open to corruption.

      Ironically, those who have been loudest in their fear of a UN one-world-government  have not yet made a huge public outcry over the TPP (Total Plutocratic Power?) which far more realistically threatens to take away our rights to choose how we wish to structure our society. Perhaps this can be an issue where Left and Right can join in opposition to a common enemy ... unless we wish our democracy to become only a puppet show with international plutocrats holding all the strings in the dark, back-stage.

    •  Ask the HOW question: (15+ / 0-)

      Quoting HRC:

      "...strong protections for workers, the environment, intellectual property, and innovation," and, "promote the free flow of information technology and the spread of green technology, as well as the coherence of our regulatory system and the efficiency of supply chains."

      How, exactly?

      For example, how exactly is TPP supposed to protect workers?

      How is it supposed to protect the environment?

      Etc. all the way down the list.

      Spell out the mechanisms, the causal relationships, and let's see if they stand up to scrutiny.

      We got the future back. Uh-oh.

      by G2geek on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 08:46:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  How (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        G2geek, snoopydawg

        Most of it's spelled out to some degree in this USTR document.

        Cynicism is what passes for insight among the mediocre.

        by Sky Net on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 09:24:08 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I think it is very safe to assume: (6+ / 0-)

        When documents or legislation/treaties etc are drafted in absolute secrecy for all but the peak interests, I think it is a very safe assumption that the proposal does nearly nothing for those shut out interests and nearly everything for those in the middle of the negotiations.

        BTW - maybe I'm wrong on this, but I was under the impression that the governments were only playing a minor role in the drafting and content, their only real role being ratification. I thought the real decisions were being made by the multi-nationals?

        I do know that less than one third of the chapters/clauses have to do with actual trade. So, kind of the definition of a Trojan horse, right there.

        Blessed are the peacemakers, the poor, the meek and the sick: The "party of Jesus" wouldn't invite him to their convention - fearing his "platform."

        by 4CasandChlo on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 12:01:07 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  At the very least the TPP is an attempt (18+ / 0-)

    to further monetize "intellectual property" to include virtually all forms of expression.    The powers-that-be see culture as a vast field that can be divided up and sold, a new continent to be exploited.  Access to every idea, every musical phrase, will have a cost.  Those not in the upper class will be marginalized from participation in the world - even worse than now.

     

    An illusion can never be destroyed directly... SK.

    by Thomas Twinnings on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 07:59:36 PM PDT

    •  What I want to know (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      stitchingasfastasIcan

      is how much the US government's black budget spooks and spies (busily vacuuming up ALL our data and content as we speak) are going to pay me for the rights to...

      1. Vacuum it all up
      2. Keep it forever
      and
      3. Sell/give it away to anybody who wants it

      ...including, of course, any commercial entities domestic and/or foreign. If the bid comes in high enough, I just might feel better about their theft of my "intellectual property."

      There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. - Will Rogers

      by Joieau on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 08:33:42 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  bypassing all the democratic safeguards that exist (2+ / 0-)
      It included copyright lengths that would last over 140 years, increasingly locking up our culture and making it illegal to access and remix. It revealed some countries' proposals on digital rights management (DRM), which are restrictions on devices and content so manufacturers can control what users can do even after they've bought them. It also had laws that would force Internet service providers and online services to spy on and police their users for copyright infringement. Under such policies, users can have their content removed or blocked, or even have their accounts suspended without so much a judge determining whether what they've done was illegal.

      Major film studios, publishers, music labels, and the rest of the copyright industries have been doing everything they can to expand its control over creative works. Through intense lobbying efforts around the world, they've been able to get laws that expand copyright restrictions. In addition to targeting domestic policies, their lobbyists concentrate on inserting these kinds of industry-friendly provisions into trade agreements.

      But why trade agreements? It's because of existing norms around trade negotiations: officials can get away with keeping trade negotiations extremely secretive, bypassing all the democratic safeguards that exist in most democratic lawmaking systems. While the public is completely denied access to the draft agreement, copyright lobbyists can influence its text and even see the draft language by participating in special advisory committees. If they can get what they want in a trade deal, countries become obligated to enact new draconian copyright laws to comply with it domestically. That means that even if a country already has an existing law that has been transparently and lawfully enacted, the terms of a secretively-negotiated trade deal could trump that law, forcing reform until it becomes compliant with the trade agreement.

      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

      _______________The DOD/ War Department, which consumes 22% of the national budget, is the world's largest employer with 3.2 million employees.

      by allenjo on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 10:32:57 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Copyright (0+ / 0-)

    Since the U.S. already has strong copyright laws, I don't see what the TPP is going to change here at home.  It may make it more difficult for other countries to pirate U.S. movies, music and software, but I don't see why that's something to worry about, especially considering how many Americans are employed in those industries.

    I'm afraid the warnings about remixing are lost on me, I don't even know what that is exactly and pretty sure I never will be involved in remixing.  Your other warnings look pretty farfetched, too.  I don't see how someone could ever use copyright law to stifle dissent.  Dissent isn't a copyright violation unless you're copying other people's work without their consent.  As you say, we already have notice and takedown and nobody's tried to use that in the past that I'm aware of.

    Cynicism is what passes for insight among the mediocre.

    by Sky Net on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 08:13:59 PM PDT

  •  I've been saying for a long time now (22+ / 0-)

    that, if the leaked information about this treaty is accurate, the TPP is nothing short of treasonous.

    "Americans have a strong devotion to afflicting the afflicted and comforting the comfortable. They have a hard time contemplating any meaningful overhaul of the rules of their political system" -- Alec Baldwin

    by Sagebrush Bob on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 08:48:35 PM PDT

    •  I agree! How could it not be? (11+ / 0-)

      Plus if a State has regulations blocking fracking or other activities that ate harmful,  a foreign corporation can sue. It then goes to a panel of 3 judges who aren't really judges, just other corporate sucks.
      And if those judges side with the corporations, then the State has to pay for their loss of profits.
      There goes the EPA, FDA, and many other agencies that are supposed to protect Americans.
      Giving  foreign corporations this type of power in OUR country is treason.
      So much for the oath to protect us from enimies foreign and domestic!  
      And this is being brought to us by the greatest president EVER!  
      Bullshit!

      "Americans don't understand that terrorists cannot take away habeas corpus, the Bill of Rights, or the Constitution. Terrorists are not anything like the threat that we face from our own government in the name of fighting terrorism."

      by snoopydawg on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 09:43:38 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  This administration and Corporate America... (15+ / 0-)

    Along with most of the VSPs from both parties have all decided that democracy is an unnecessary impediment to their progress and profits, and have decided to just cut all us little people out of the process entirely.

    And for every issue in which the Democrats present a clearly better option than the GOP (i.e. reproductive health), we seem to find another where Democrats are hellbent on erasing the distinction as much as possible. Not only is it blatantly harmful to working-Americans, but it's actively hostile to both "small d" democracy, and the best interests of the Democratic Party. There is no way Obama can sell this pile of shit to the American people, but it's going to get done, so to hell with asking for permission.

    Along with the industry-driven efforts to end net neutrality, the TPP is a clear piece of evidence that we're becoming a failed representative democracy. Expect more of this going forward. They have us by the balls and they know it. Until we figure out a way to end this sham, they'll never respect or fear us in the same way they respect and fear corporate America.

  •  One of the most stunning stories I've EVER read... (18+ / 0-)

    ...appeared in the Guardian, today (h/t to Kossack joe shikspack). The excerpt, below, barely scratches the surface of the taxpayer-supported mindf*ck described in it. If you care about living in a reality-based world, you really should make it your business to read the whole thing. Alternatively, you may always choose to hide underneath the covers of your bed...


    US military studied how to influence Twitter users in Darpa-funded research

    • Defense Department spent millions to research social networks
    • Studies focused on Occupy and Middle East protests
    • Projects also analysed memes, celebrities and disinformation

    Ben Quinn and James Ball in London
    theguardian.com
    Tuesday 8 July 2014 12.02 EDT

    The activities of users of Twitter and other social media services were recorded and analysed as part of a major project funded by the US military, in a program that covers ground similar to Facebook’s controversial experiment into how to control emotions by manipulating news feeds.

    Research funded directly or indirectly by the US Department of Defense’s military research department, known as Darpa, has involved users of some of the internet’s largest destinations, including Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Kickstarter, for studies of social connections and how messages spread.

    While some elements of the multi-million dollar project might raise a wry smile – research has included analysis of the tweets of celebrities such as Lady Gaga and Justin Bieber, in an attempt to understand influence on Twitter – others have resulted in the buildup of massive datasets of tweets and additional types social media posts.

    Several of the DoD-funded studies went further than merely monitoring what users were communicating on their own, instead messaging unwitting participants in order to track and study how they responded.

    Shortly before the Facebook controversy erupted, Darpa published a lengthy list of the projects funded under its Social Media in Strategic Communication (SMISC) program, including links to actual papers and abstracts.

    The project list includes a study of how activists with the Occupy movement used Twitter as well as a range of research on tracking internet memes and some about understanding how influence behaviour (liking, following, retweeting) happens on a range of popular social media platforms like Pinterest, Twitter, Kickstarter, Digg and Reddit...
    ...

    ...Unveiled in 2011, the SMISC program was regarded as a bid by the US military to become better at both detecting and conducting propaganda campaigns on social media...

    This isn't even the half of it...read on (the link's up above).

    "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

    by bobswern on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 09:11:53 PM PDT

    •  They seem to have plenty of money (11+ / 0-)

      To do this study, yet there is no money available for the VA, SNAP, WIC, Unemployment benifits, ect.
      Face it, the US has had a corporate coup, and many presidents and congress are and we're complicit.
      Fuck them all!  
      I wish we would all quit paying our taxes. Why not, the corporations get away with it.
      Or move their headquarters to another country to avoid paying their taxes.
      If Walgreens moves off shore, they shouldn't get to be paidby Medicare or Medicaid. People can go to local pharmacies to get their scripts filled.
      Boy, am I pissed at what they are doing to us!  

      "Americans don't understand that terrorists cannot take away habeas corpus, the Bill of Rights, or the Constitution. Terrorists are not anything like the threat that we face from our own government in the name of fighting terrorism."

      by snoopydawg on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 09:55:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Not to mention the death-knell for any hope (11+ / 0-)

    of preventing cataclysmic climate change.

    Or stopping any international corporation from leaving a carcinogenic turd in your drinking water.

    Under TTP/TTIP, corporations will be able to sue governments to overturn laws that they claim impede their potential profits.  They could sue for the full amount of those projected profits.  

    And would the cases be heard in public jury trials?  HA!  Don't be silly, they'd never leave it up to us.  No, the trials would be both brought and adjudicated by corporate lawyers on a rotating basis.

    There would be no appeals.

    Being internet-less would be bad and damaging, but frankly, it scares me a lot less than not being able to decide to do ANYTHING, on a federal, state, county, or municipal level, that threatened a corporations' pipe dream profits.

    © cai Visit 350.org to join the fight against global warming.

    by cai on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 09:52:44 PM PDT

  •  Our one hope is the gact that Harry Reid and (9+ / 0-)

    and Senate Finance Committee chair Ron Wyden are both opposed to giving it fast track authorization, which means that Obama won't be able to pass it in secret, without serious debate.

    Man, I don't understand where BHO is coming from. This could overshadow all the good he has done. It would be a horrible legacy for his presidency.

    It's even more reason to have a progressive alternative to Hillary in order to keep this in front of the American people as much as possible.

    You might very well think that; I couldn't possibly comment.

    by MikePhoenix on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 10:02:23 PM PDT

    •  Harry Reid is against giving it fast track until (5+ / 0-)

      after the election.

      Which is better than the alternative, BUT...

      It's even more reason to have a progressive alternative to Hillary in order to keep this in front of the American people as much as possible.
      And one more reason to have it be Elizabeth Warren -- she's been on point on this for awhile.

      But any Dem who brings it up as a bad thing in the primaries would have my thanks... and any Dem who defends or promotes it frightens me, no matter how much good they have or might do in other realms.

      © cai Visit 350.org to join the fight against global warming.

      by cai on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 10:08:07 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  You really can't see where BHO (7+ / 0-)

      is coming from?  
      I do. From his reneging on filibustering the FISA act, to no mandate, to his awful cabinet picks, to not holding the war and bank criminal tesponsible for their crimes, ect.    
      I know exactly where he is coming from and who he really represents.
      And do you really think Hillary or any GOP president will not do the same things to us?  
      This has been in the works since Reagon, Bush, Clinton, Bush and now Obama.

      "Americans don't understand that terrorists cannot take away habeas corpus, the Bill of Rights, or the Constitution. Terrorists are not anything like the threat that we face from our own government in the name of fighting terrorism."

      by snoopydawg on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 10:35:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Maybe Shutting Down the Government (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    snoopydawg

    wasn't such a bad idea, after all.

  •  If TPP has ANY merit, it CAN withstand (7+ / 0-)

    LOTS of sunshine and time!

    BUT, to let a treaty pass in darkness that inhibits democracy is nothing less than treason.

    Separation of Church and State AND Corporation

    by Einsteinia on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 10:53:42 PM PDT

  •  "May be"? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cybrestrike, martini

    Government and laws are the agreement we all make to secure everyone's freedom.

    by Simplify on Tue Jul 08, 2014 at 11:21:46 PM PDT

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