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Cathey Park of Cambridge, Massachusetts shows her cast signed by U.S. President Barack Obama after he spoke about health insurance at Faneuil Hall in Boston October 30, 2013. The writing on the cast reads, "I Love Obamacare." REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
A new study shows that the Affordable Care Act has enabled ten million previously uninsured Americans to get health insurance. Ten million people.
Using Gallup polling and HHS data, Harvard researchers estimate that the uninsured rate declined by 5.2 percentage points in the second quarter of this year, corresponding to 10.3 million adults gaining coverage — although that could range from 7.3 to 17.2 million depending on how the data are interpreted. [...]

There was a major difference between the states that expanded Medicaid under the health law — where it caused the uninsured rate to dip by an estimated 5.1 percent — and those that didn’t, where there wasn’t any statistical change associated with Medicaid enrollment.

Compare ten million newly insured Americans with this:
[A]n astonishing 72 percent of Republicans, and 64 percent of conservatives, say the law hasn’t helped anyone.
... and marvel at the continuing ability of conservatives to simply construct their own version of reality where they're right and the events of the actual world simply don't happen. And note that with that success in lowering uninsured rates from expanding Medicaid, the denial of expanded Medicaid coverage in conservative states should be considered very nearly a crime. And note that if Obama had somehow blocked those states' expanded coverage, they'd be impeaching him right now.

Originally posted to Hunter on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 09:59 AM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  There's an old quip that goes (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gentle Giant, david78209, MarkW53, MartyM, hbk

    "Drugs are for people who can't handle reality"

    Which means the entire Republican party is high as a kite 24/7.

    GOP 2014 strategy -- Hire clowns, elephants, and a ringmaster and say "a media circus" has emerged and blame Democrats for lack of progress. Have pundits agree that "both sides are to blame" and hope the public will stay home on election day.

    by ontheleftcoast on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 10:08:05 AM PDT

  •  You've probably read the story of the Scorpion (5+ / 0-)

    and the Frog.
    I thing it's their nature and we've known that all along, but we constantly believe in the hope for change.
    I don't see anything wrong with hoping for change, but I do wonder about expressing surprise when change doesn't happen.

    "If you tell the truth, you won't have to remember anything", Mark Twain

    by Cruzankenny on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 10:09:48 AM PDT

  •  10 million people who will hopefully go to the (16+ / 0-)

    polls and vote their own self-interest for once.

    This is not some theoretical pie-in-the-sky self-interest, either. This is meds in your cupboard, doctor appointments, life saving self-interest.

    If this doesn't get people to the polls, literally nothing will. If you can't save their lives and save their wallets and get them to vote for you, then I frankly give up.

    “Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough.” FDR

    by Phoebe Loosinhouse on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 10:18:28 AM PDT

  •  Perhaps (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gentle Giant, True North

    But the recent CNN poll say that only 18% of Americans think they are "better off" under the ACA. That's less than one in five Americans. 35% say "worse off".  This is actually quite contradictory to what I've been reading here lately.

    I've always thought that the way people vote in November, to the extent that they vote based on the ACA, will not be how much good or bad they think the law is doing to the country, but how it's really impacting them in their real lives (and those of their neighbours and family).  

    Dammit Jim, I'm a lawyer, not a grammarian. So sue me.

    by Pi Li on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 11:20:45 AM PDT

    •  The ACA has only directly impacted about 24-29 mil (8+ / 0-)

      ...million people via QHPs, Medicaid expansion, sub26ers etc.

      That's less than 10% of the country.

      For 18% to say it's helped them is actually AMAZINGLY good.

      •  And 34% saying they are "worse off" is...what? (0+ / 0-)

        Amazingly bad?

        Dammit Jim, I'm a lawyer, not a grammarian. So sue me.

        by Pi Li on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 11:25:56 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Republicans will claim they're "worse off" until (11+ / 0-)

          ...a Republican is in the White House again, period.

          By an amazing coincidence, roughly 34% of the country identifies themselves as Republican, give or take.

          •  Very true (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            lgmcp

            But I think you'd also have to say that part of the 18% of the people saying they are "better off" might be doing so for partisan reasons as well.

            You be the judge of how all these numbers will translate to votes in November.

            Dammit Jim, I'm a lawyer, not a grammarian. So sue me.

            by Pi Li on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 11:29:47 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  it's teabaggers bashing the ACA (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          askew, poleshifter

          whether true or not, they're gonna say it sucks regardless of reality.  Baggers/Repubs, pretty much the same thing at this point.
          Are you really mystified by this?

          you can shit on my face but that doesn't mean I have to lick my lips

          by red rabbit on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 12:01:25 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  I don't think you're characterizing the CNN poll (0+ / 0-)

          accurately.  

          Of the 35% that said "worse off" and 46% who said "about the same" and the 1% who had "no opinion" they were further asked the question "if it was better off for other families or whether it had not helped anyone in the country?"

          On the second question, 35% said that it was "better off for other families" and 44% said it had "not helped anyone" while 3% had "no opinion."  

          That is better understood as 18% say they are "better off" while 35% said that it was "better for other families" and 44% said it had "not helped anyone."  I'd say it is fairly obvious who the 44% are.

        •  Depends (0+ / 0-)

          If those 34% are all Republicans (or independents who always vote Republican), Fox News/talk radio audience, etc, then I'd say that the 34% are irrelevant.

          On the other hand, if a substantial number of those 34% are political moderates, then it should be cause for concern.

          We don't have enough information to know whether that 34% is meaningful or not.

          If Democrats proclaim the the Earth is round and Republicans insist it is flat, we will shortly see a column in the Washington Post claiming the the earth is really a semi-circle.

          by TexasTom on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 04:36:07 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  The question as to whether the family is (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lgmcp, ivorybill, True North, smartdemmg

      "Better off":  it's a loaded question. For example, I think the law is generally good and America is better off for it. But on a personal level? Doesn't affect my family at all. All six of us either have corporate insurance or Medicare.
      But without considering what the question really means, it could seem like an overall opinion of the Act.
      On the other hand, I feel the Act is a big INDIRECT benefit to my children and their spouses: they NEVER again have t worry that they won't have health insurance, even if they lose their jobs. Or that preexisting conditions will prevent being insured.

      •  Hmmmm (0+ / 0-)
        On the other hand, I feel the Act is a big INDIRECT benefit to my children and their spouses: they NEVER again have t worry that they won't have health insurance, even if they lose their jobs.
        I'm not sure this is true. It would certainly be true if the US would have gone with a single payer model, but their access to insurance is still going to be at least partially predicated on their ability to pay and where they live.

        Dammit Jim, I'm a lawyer, not a grammarian. So sue me.

        by Pi Li on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 11:38:31 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Well in states that have expanded Medicaid (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          True North

          It is hands  down true. And that includes all the states my family lives in. So , with all due respect, my answer stands. And the larger point us, the question you referred to is framed very narrowly.

          •  Well, again (0+ / 0-)

            My point was that, IMO, to the extent that people vote based on the ACA, it will be informed by how the law impacts them, their family, and the people around them...not whatever they read about how it's impacting the rest of the county.

            Your comments bear that out.

            Dammit Jim, I'm a lawyer, not a grammarian. So sue me.

            by Pi Li on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 11:43:28 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  Hmmmmmmm (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          askew, madronagal

          you're really looking for any angle to bash a law that is helping millions.  Better they had nothing and had to pay everyting out of pocket and go bankrupt rather than have anything less than single payer.  

          you can shit on my face but that doesn't mean I have to lick my lips

          by red rabbit on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 12:03:39 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I'm sorry? (0+ / 0-)

            I don't think I "bashed the law" at all. I didn't even say anything about the law, just commented on what the polling data was saying.

            I'd prefer something that removed employers from the health care equation altogether, but that ship has sailed.

            And I disagree with this...

            Better they had nothing and had to pay everyting out of pocket and go bankrupt rather than have anything less than single payer.  
            That's pretty cold-hearted of you. No one should have to go bankrupt over medical expenses.

            Dammit Jim, I'm a lawyer, not a grammarian. So sue me.

            by Pi Li on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 01:16:37 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Ship hasn't necessarily sailed (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Pi Li, JBraden

              We can still push forward for single payer universal health care. While Obamacare has helped, it still includes the insurance company leeches, the religious control of healthcare choices, and employer interference. We deserve better and should not stop fighting until we get it.

      •  But you did benefit directly (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        madronagal

        - No more pre-existing conditions
        - No more annual or lifetime caps on benefits
        - No more gender discrimination in setting premiums
        - No charge for annual preventative visits with your doctor
        - Insurance companies must spend 80% of premiums on benefits (85% for large groups) or refund you the difference.

        There were plenty of benefits for average consumers who get their insurance through work - it wasn't just a matter of their employers being generous.

        Election Day is Nov 4th, 2014 It's time for the Undo button on the 2010 Election.

        by bear83 on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 12:10:48 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Another polling should be done. I don't trust CNN (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chelonia testudines

      Have someone else do the poll.

  •  Conservatives don't consider us human. (0+ / 0-)

    So . . . yeah.

  •  It would be interesting (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lgmcp, ivorybill, True North

    To see how many of that 10 million were Republicans and then ask them if Obamacare helped anyone.

    It would be a guess the numbers would be the same...

    The blinders are locked in tight and ready to go.....I believe Sgt.  Schultz is their poster child..

    "I know nothing!!!"

    "We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them." -- Albert Einstein

    by lynn47 on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 11:23:19 AM PDT

  •  The fact that conservatives (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lgmcp

    believe that the ACA has been bad for America validates the concept that tribal loyalties (stoked for years by Fox and the conservative media) trump facts; always have, and will continue to.

  •  Is there ANY rational person now.. (0+ / 0-)

    who can look at the antics of the Republican party in recent years (since Bush) and determine it is anything OTHER than a domestic terror organization, whose aims are to subvert Democracy at all costs, and to destroy Democratic governance, regardless of the financial or personal pain inflicted on the citizens of this nation, ON WHOSE BEHALF THEY ARE PAID TO GOVERN!!!

    Morons. all of them

    America's LAST HOPE: vote the GOP OUT in 2014 elections. MAKE them LOSE the House Majority and reduce their numbers in the Senate. Democrats move America forward - Republicans take us backward and are KILLING OUR NATION!

    by dagnome on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 11:27:11 AM PDT

  •  Regarding impeaching the Prez: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    True North

    My B-I-L told me at the reunion last weekend that Obama is going to "change the law and steal the presidency again."

    Yeah. Intelligent enough to have built a thriving company doing business internationally, but still watches FoxNews.

    He is also convinced that "most people's rates went up after Obamacare (was enacted)."

    Fortunately, there were plenty of rels around so that I wasn't the only one doing the debunking.

    I wish he'd allow himself to stop being politically ignorant.

    Lead with Love. Forgive as a reflex.

    by Gentle Giant on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 11:27:52 AM PDT

    •  It's not that he lacks information (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Gentle Giant

      it's that he is eagerly consuming false information and actively rejecting accurate information.  I suppose that is a type of ignorance, but it is the willful kind.  

      "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

      by lgmcp on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 12:00:59 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  How does one (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Gentle Giant

      How does one even debate that type of willful ignorance?

      How many minutes in did he say he was entitled to his opinions (about facts!)?

      Was he in any way open to accepting actual facts, and then revising his opinions and statements based on those facts? Or did he leave the conversation even more determined in his beliefs than when it started?

      •  He didn't answer anything that (0+ / 0-)

        contradicted him. He stopped talking politics all together when I mentioned the 3 independent studies that showed FoxNews watchers were less informed than those that consumed no news at all.

        Lead with Love. Forgive as a reflex.

        by Gentle Giant on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 06:14:48 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Good work (0+ / 0-)

      Gentle Giant, you did some good work there with your B-I-L.

      He sounds like one of those people who trust that something that looks like a news network really is providing news. People around DKos parts are passionately interested in political news--hearing about it, discussing it, analyzing it. But maybe your B-I-L doesn't share that same keen interest.

      So I think you did well when you showed him that what he believed to be true actually isn't. Maybe he will start to have some doubts about his sources, and maybe, some day, he will turn to a more reliable news source. Like the Daily Show.

  •  Helping someone get insurance doesn't HELP them (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ivorybill
    72 percent of Republicans, and 64 percent of conservatives, say the law hasn’t helped anyone
    because having publicly-subsidized medical coverage HURTS you, see.  It hurts your spirit of sturdy self-reliance and saps your moral fiber.  

    Dying of preventable or untreated illnesses, on the other hand, is GREAT for your moral fiber.  So that HELPS you.   All clear now?  

    "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

    by lgmcp on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 11:35:36 AM PDT

  •  #NotAllAmericans (0+ / 0-)

    "HHS Now Exempts Five U.S. Territories from Obamacare"

    The source is sketchy and the only other article I can find is from Guam with few details.

    Anyway, if true then this includes Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

    http://www.chinatopix.com/...

  •  Medical Decisions (0+ / 0-)

    If you Republican Dinks want to practice medicine, go to school. Otherwise STFU.

  •  votes (0+ / 0-)

    let's all cross our fingers that translates into 10 million anti-rightwingnutregressiveteavangelimpuglicant votes in 120 days!

    •  It won't. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      True North

      People have powerful logic-tight compartments that separate their political beliefs from any evidence that would contradict them.  

      For instance, they can believe that THEY deserved to get some government help to get insurance, but that the program as a whole is still bad because it helps mostly UNdeserving individuals and illegal immigrants.  (Yes, I know that undocumented individuals aren't eligible, but I guarantee you that Fox viewers believe they are.)

      "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

      by lgmcp on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 11:46:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  That is, (0+ / 0-)

      some who never voted, or who voted Republican, will cast Democratic votes.  But far, far from all.   A conversion rate of 50% would be stunningly wonderful.

      "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

      by lgmcp on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 11:54:37 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  A lot of people got better insurance (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TheLizardKing, True North

    out of the deal too.

    "Drudge: soundslike sludge, islike sewage."
    (-7.25, -6.72)

    by gougef on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 11:44:43 AM PDT

    •  They don't all realize it (0+ / 0-)

      Most people who have never been dumped by an insurance company, and who don't have a friend or family member who has, don't think that they ever would have been dumped for developing an expensive ailment. They just think you get dumped for being irresponsible and not paying your premiums, or for lying to the insurer.

      People who have never had a child, 18-26, who might have to go without insurance, might never have thought about the situation of 18-26 year old kids.

      Some people have noticed that services that used to cost them a good chunk of change are now free. But not everybody realizes that.

  •  Republicans don't believe it helped anyone (0+ / 0-)

    who matters. Based on every interaction I've had with the anti-Obamacare crowd, they consider anyone who would dare take advantage of the ACA to obtain insurance to be a freeloading, tax-sucking, socialism-enabling sub-human.

    •  Unless it's self or a loved one (0+ / 0-)

      in which case THEY had good reasons for deserving it.

      "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

      by lgmcp on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 12:15:48 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  (raises hand) one in 10 Million (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lgmcp

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "If we appear to seek the unattainable, then let it be known that we do so to avoid the unimaginable." (@eState4Column5)

    by annieli on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 12:13:38 PM PDT

  •  and the CNN "news" on their front page today (0+ / 0-)

    is "CNN Poll: Is Obamacare working?

    I know it's not really new - but when did poll results become bigger news than actual facts?  Why doesn't the CNN article report that ACA actually is working, instead of just parroting the polls of what people think?

    Opinions don't trump facts - unless you only report uninformed opinion as the only news around.

  •  You have to hand it to them: (0+ / 0-)

    Their obstructionism and propaganda worked. Most people don't think they are better off as a result of Obamacare or that OTHERS are better off.

    I understand why -- many of us did not see a drop in premium (I didn't) -- just better coverage for the price (prescription drugs, preventative care).  

    Also, there were disruptions and people hand to make new decisions regarding insurance -- their old insurance was sometimes cancelled because it didn't meet standards, but they weren't told that it was inferior, just that it was being cancelled.

    Obamacare was a victory, but not one that people can easily grasp. It's insurance. And they have to pay for it.

    If you hate government, don't run for office in that government.

    by Bensdad on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 12:29:14 PM PDT

  •  It would appear that (0+ / 0-)

    An astonishing number of Republicans and conservatives did not check their mailboxes for their health insurance rebate check...

    Although actually, I'm sure they all sent it back in protest.

  •  Let's say it one more time...... (0+ / 0-)

    ....concerning the b.s. poll:  EVERYONE who has insurance has benefited from ACA.  EVERYONE.  

    No pre-existing conditions, kids on policies to age 26, 80% of premiums must go to health care, and so much more. And let's not forget that seniors got enormous benefits in Medicare from ACA, and yet they choose to believe GOP scare tactics and won't believe the truth.  

    Infuriating.

  •  10 Million (0+ / 0-)

    WOW! and I thought Obamasurance was not any good. It isn't any good for anyone except the insurance companies. Charge more give less mentality is for profit companies. Take the insurance companies out of the mix and costs go down care actually happens and 330 million people are covered. Now with those numbers I could stand up and shout HALLELUYA!!!

  •  ACA and GOP reality (0+ / 0-)

    Reaction of repubs and conservative eerily similar to Russians interpretations of MH17 shoot down. They are subject to Russian propaganda, here in the land of unequal opportunity they (we) are subjected to Fox news. Good luck America!

  •  Its time to sue Republicans... (0+ / 0-)

    ...for the deaths and lives they've destroyed in the red states for denying Medicare expansion. Anyone going to take a stand?

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