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The U.S. Department of Agriculture(USDA) is reporting that the Manda Packing Company based in Louisiana has expanded a recall of meat products to 468,000 pounds because of possible bacterial contamination. The recall includes roast beef, ham, turkey breast, tasso pork, ham shanks, hog headcheese, corned beef, and pastrami. No illnesses have been reported

The agriculture department said Friday the products were recalled because of possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes.

The products were shipped to retailers in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.

The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service listed eight types of meat sold under 41 different names with various "sell by" dates. Its news release said some of the products may have been sliced at retail delis, and if so will not bear packaging information.

The USDA said eating food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, an uncommon but potentially fatal disease. They also said healthy people do not contact listeriosis; just those with immune deficiencies and I would guess that to include; the young, old and pregnant. Don't you feel better now?

The case against meat keeps building. Not only is eating meat a serious personal health risk but it's also a public health risk due to the amounts of antibiotics and hormones added to animal feed. And most importantly; the meat industry is one of the major contributors to Climate Change and Resource Depletion. Cigarettes were labeled dangerous without nearly so many negative effects.

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Comment Preferences

  •  I Follow You. Read What You Write (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    OleHippieChick, Orinoco, bumbi

    and I am not in the boat you are. I still eat meat.

    With that said I tend to shop 2-3 times a week so I can have fresh fruit and veggies in my house. But about every two months or so I buy in larger amounts. Bulk. Stuff I can freeze or dry store. Outside of some fish I didn't buy any meat last time.  

    When opportunity calls pick up the phone and give it directions to your house.

    by webranding on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 08:08:30 AM PDT

  •  Twitted, bb. (4+ / 0-)

    "He went to Harvard, not Hogwarts." ~Wanda Sykes
    No representation without taxation. Rich and don't pay? Shut up.
    Blessinz of teh Ceiling Cat be apwn yu, srsly.

    by OleHippieChick on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 08:11:02 AM PDT

  •  Oh Just A Story. I Think I Mentioned (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BYw, thomask, RWood, MartyM, sillia

    this to you before. I don't have any kids. One niece. She is 4. She won't eat anything that has a "face" (her words). My Republican brother thought at first I told her this. I was like dude, your kid. Not mine. I won't tell you how to raise her, plus I eat meat.

    Outside of fruit she eats pretty much rice. Grains. I think I said to his wife, a billion folks in Asia can't be wrong can they. Rice gets them by. A wonderful food.

    When opportunity calls pick up the phone and give it directions to your house.

    by webranding on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 08:34:19 AM PDT

  •  Funny , when I suggested things along (0+ / 0-)

    these lines in the past , you shot them down .

    Drop the name-calling MB 2/4/11 + Please try to use ratings properly! Kos 9/9/11

    by indycam on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 08:41:49 AM PDT

  •  The NIH study advocates eating fish and poultry (5+ / 0-)
    The researchers estimated that substituting 1 serving per day of other foods—like fish, poultry, nuts, legumes, low-fat dairy and whole grains—for red meat could lower the risk of mortality by 7% to 19%.
    I'd also like to see a study comparing the health effects of consumption of conventionally-raised beef compared to grass fed beef.  I suspect the negative health effects associated with red meat would be dramatically diminished or even eliminated if consumption of naturally-raised cows was considered.  Of course, it would be very hard to conduct such a study due to the scarcity of such meat in this country.

    Let me say that I LOVE your 'Meatless Mondays' initiative.  However, instead of just saying ZOMG-RED-MEAT-IS-BAD we should try to educate people on how to eat less but higher quality meat for better health.

    "Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it... unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense." -The Buddha

    by Brian A on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 08:48:06 AM PDT

    •  I'd Love To See That Study (0+ / 0-)

      I'd say about 75% of the chicken, beef, or pork I eat is grown locally. I don't mean to be a dick here talking meat in a diary by a person that doesn't eat meat. I really don't.

      But if you have bought locally grown meat and then stuff at Wal-Mart, well you know what I am talking about. Night and day difference.

      When opportunity calls pick up the phone and give it directions to your house.

      by webranding on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 08:52:29 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  there is a reason why there is a scarcity of .... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      True North, pat bunny, SoCaliana

      sustainable raised meat and that is because raising meat is not sustainable.  Sure it could be raised without antibiotics & hormones but it also uses MEGA amounts of land and water. Climate Change and population forecast that meat as we know it will not be in our future

      Macca's Meatless Monday

      by VL Baker on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 09:00:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  That Just Isn't True (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Brian A

        I try to respect you have a different take then I do. What I talk about is me trying to eat less meat. A lot less. It was thought there were 80 million buffalos in the US before the Europeans got here. Ponder that for a few seconds.

        Even free range we can grow a ton of meat.

        The question for me is how much meat we eat.

        This women I used to date. Wonderful lady. A Vegan. She has now gone over to what I'd call the "dark side" that I am the first coming of the devil cause I eat meat. Thinks the same of anybody that eats eats meat.

        When opportunity calls pick up the phone and give it directions to your house.

        by webranding on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 09:28:47 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  FACTS.... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          sillia

          http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/...

          The global scope of the livestock issue is huge. A 212-page online report published by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization says 26 percent of the earth’s terrestrial surface is used for livestock grazing. One-third of the planet’s arable land is occupied by livestock feed crop cultivation. Seventy percent of Brazil’s deforested land is used as pasture, with feed crop cultivation occupying much of the remainder. And in Botswana, the livestock industry consumes 23 percent of all water used. Globally, 18 percent of greenhouse gas emissions can be attributed to the livestock industry—more than is produced by transportation-related sources. And in the United States, livestock production is responsible for 55 percent of erosion, 37 percent of all applied pesticides and 50 percent of antibiotics consumed, while the animals themselves directly consume 95 percent of our oat production and 80 percent of our corn, according to the Sierra Club.
          From my last MMM:
             Water

              Between watering the crops that farmed animals eat, providing drinking water for billions of animals each year, and cleaning away the filth in factory farms, transport trucks, and slaughterhouses, the farmed animal industry places a serious strain on our water supply. Nearly half of all the water used in the United States goes to raising animals for food. In 2008, John Anthony Allan, a professor at King's College London and the winner of the prestigious Stockholm Water Prize, urged people worldwide to go vegetarian because of the tremendous waste of water involved with eating animals.

              It takes more than 2,400 gallons of water to produce 1 pound of meat, while growing 1 pound of wheat only requires 25 gallons. You save more water by not eating a pound of meat than you do by not showering for six months! A totally vegan diet requires only 300 gallons of water per day, while a typical meat-eating diet requires more than 4,000 gallons of water per day.

          source

          Macca's Meatless Monday

          by VL Baker on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 09:39:18 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  first quote needs update 80% of antibiotics (0+ / 0-)

            used in US are used in animal feed.  wrote a diary about it.
            Stunning.

            Macca's Meatless Monday

            by VL Baker on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 09:43:42 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  You Are Picking A Fight With Somebody (0+ / 0-)

            that agrees with you and you don't even seem to realize it. Not a good advocate.

            Can every citizen of the world have pork for breakfast, lunch, and dinner tomorrow. Nope. Not even close. We got to stop this shit 24/7.

            But then to say we can't have ANY meat, well you go over-the-top. That our world can't handle the raising of a few aminals is just a joke.

            I could put back almost the same argument you used against me, that we plant to many crops. That land should be used to graze animals as it was before.

            When opportunity calls pick up the phone and give it directions to your house.

            by webranding on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 09:55:52 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Exactly. (0+ / 0-)

              'Meat' is not unsustainable.  But the amounts of meat we eat most certainly are.  And it starts with cows, which are terribly wasteful.

              "Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it... unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense." -The Buddha

              by Brian A on Mon Apr 15, 2013 at 05:02:41 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  I see an 'or' in there. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SoCaliana

      In that boxquote, they aren't specifically endorsing fish or poultry, just pointing out that it's less dangerous than red meat.  

  •  spinach too . . . (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    smokeymonkey, OLinda, rb137, allergywoman

    http://www.delish.com/...

    Ain't much left that's safe to eat.

    Fake Left, Drive Right . . . not my idea of a Democrat . . .

    by Deward Hastings on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 08:51:11 AM PDT

    •  spinach because of meat contamination n/t (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      True North, rb137

      Macca's Meatless Monday

      by VL Baker on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 08:54:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  spinach :( (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      beach babe in fl
      The recalled spinach was sold in 5-ounce and 16-ounce trays. Brand names involved include: Central Market Organics, Full Circle Organics, Marketside Organics, Simple Truth Organics, and Taylor Farms Organics. Anyone with spinach sold under these names with a sell by date of February 24th 2013 should discard it immediately.
      I just opened some Simple Truth Organics spinach this morning and had some with an egg. Sell by date of course was way past the 2/24 date.

      I agree there is not much or maybe nothing left that is safe to eat. And, I hadn't even heard about this recall. It would not surprise me if I had some with that sell by date because I usually keep it on hand.

      •  spinach probably sprayed with animal manure nt (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        rb137

        Macca's Meatless Monday

        by VL Baker on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 09:26:47 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Organic farming prohibits (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        beach babe in fl, allergywoman

        using animal fertilizer. For me, it's one of the main reasons I buy organic produce. I eat most of my produce raw.

        Breathe in. Breathe out. Forget this, and attaining enlightenment will be the least of your problems.

        by rb137 on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 10:00:35 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  i buy organic also as i like to avoid... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SoCaliana, rb137

          pesticides sprayed on produce. I do think it's important to wash all produce carefully.

          Macca's Meatless Monday

          by VL Baker on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 10:15:49 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  slight correction (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          skohayes

          organic farming does allow using animal manures, that is one of the cornerstones of organic growing. However in its purest form it would not allow manure from animals that had been treated with chemicals. So, organically-raised livestock could provide manure for an organic farm or garden.

          I don't eat meat, nor do I raise any livestock. However on occasion I have brought in horse manure for my large organic garden.

          In general, even if you buy organic produce, you have to wash it well and you need to pay attention to your sources.

          •  slight correction (0+ / 0-)

            Organic farmers are prohibited from using raw manure no less than 90 days prior to the harvest of a crop for human consumption.

            They don't process vegetables in the field with fresh manure -- which is what causes the food-borne illness problem.

            Breathe in. Breathe out. Forget this, and attaining enlightenment will be the least of your problems.

            by rb137 on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 11:19:36 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Well, sure (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              skohayes

              that's just a management issue--raw manure has a lot of problems anyway for the grower and typically it's composted first before use. Applying raw manure to a field would be something best done in the off-season or fallow times, not onto growing crops--I mean, for horticultural reasons not only for sanitation reasons. You can actually kill plants with it.

              This guideline (the 90 days rule) is a good one, one which a responsible grower would follow anyway.

              I thought you were saying that organic growers may not use manure at all, which isn't the case, naturally. And if the manure is contaminated 90 days won't guarantee healthy produce. Toxic metals, for instance, don't degrade or leach away that quickly. It's very important that we buy vegetables from growers who use organic inputs only, including manure from organically raised livestock.

              •  Lettuce and baby spinach take less (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                sillia

                than 90 days to mature. Many crops do. But I think we're really on the same page here. I agree with you strongly about everything you're saying.

                Breathe in. Breathe out. Forget this, and attaining enlightenment will be the least of your problems.

                by rb137 on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 12:23:21 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

    •  just subscribed (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      rb137, beach babe in fl

      to Food Safety's email. Maybe I will hear about the next recall that way. Would like to use the RSS feed but this craptastic Chrome browser doesn't know how. I have to get an add on or something.

  •  It's difficult to stop people from eating animals (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    beach babe in fl, pat bunny

    and their secretions. But the more education the better. It might be a necessity in the future.

  •  Since Jan. 1, my diet has been about 90% vegan. (5+ / 0-)

    I've lost about 25 lbs, I have a lot more energy, I breath better, sleep better, etc, etc.
    My reason for the change is simply for better nutrition.
    There's more protein in 50 calories of broccoli than 100 calories of steak. All the good stuff and no heart disease.
    If beef is what's for dinner, then we waste incredible resources for a truly inferior and damaging product.

    -4.38, -7.64 Voyager 1: proof that what goes up never comes down.

    by pat bunny on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 09:28:11 AM PDT

    •  Well, it sounds sensible (0+ / 0-)

      until you figure out that meat is more nutrient dense than vegetables.
      So you'd have to eat about five times more broccoli than steak to get the same amount of protein.
      Basically, if you eat steak with broccoli, you've got it covered.

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 02:25:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Meat is NOT more nutrient dense than green veg.. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SoCaliana

        It IS more calorie dense. This why one can eat a lot of calories and still be starving. Your body is craving nutrition more than calories. Calories are simply a measure of heat energy--like joules or BTU.

        -4.38, -7.64 Voyager 1: proof that what goes up never comes down.

        by pat bunny on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 03:11:28 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Here, (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        beach babe in fl, SoCaliana

        Check this out.
        Cheers, to your health.

        -4.38, -7.64 Voyager 1: proof that what goes up never comes down.

        by pat bunny on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 03:16:06 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Try something from a university (0+ / 0-)

          They do research, something that is unfortunately lacking at Wikipedia.

          Foods that supply generous amounts of one or more nutrients compared to the number of calories they supply are called nutrient dense. Eggs, for example, have a high nutrient density, because they provide protein and many vitamins and minerals in proportion their calories.

          Nutrient density is a way of evaluating the nutritional quality of a food by comparing the amount of nutrients supplied in relation to the amount of calories supplied. Table 1 compares the key nutrients found per 100 calories of certain representative foods.

          http://www.clemson.edu/...

          Let's compare 100 calories of meat to 100 calories of an apple (there is a chart at the link).
          Meat has more protein, more iron, more zinc, more niacin, and more B-vitamins per 100 calories than an apple.

          So yes, it is more nutrient dense, because there are more nutrients.

          “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

          by skohayes on Mon Apr 15, 2013 at 03:41:45 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  There is a source of hormone free, anti biotics (0+ / 0-)

    free, meat that is causing lots of environmental devastation (it's a feral), that is enjoyed widely in Europe, yet we outlaw the use of this meat. I'm talking about feral horse meat, that we are now paying 75 million a year to feed in holding pens and other populations that are destroying the habitat of indigenous flora and fauna.

    Another case of ideology trumping science.

    How big is your personal carbon footprint?

    by ban nock on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 09:54:22 AM PDT

  •  Non-organic vegetables are sometimes (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    beach babe in fl, SoCaliana

    in this boat, too. The fertilizer used on many non-organic crops is tainted with E-coli. Lettuces, spinach, scallions -- all of this stuff is processed in the field, and not necessarily safe to eat raw, even after it's been rinsed at home. People die from this.

    Breathe in. Breathe out. Forget this, and attaining enlightenment will be the least of your problems.

    by rb137 on Sun Apr 14, 2013 at 09:57:52 AM PDT

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