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To ear-shattering cheers, Minnesota House passes gay marriage law, 75-59. Senate to consider Mon. http://t.co/...
@dabeard via web

NY Times:
The level of the most important heat-trapping gas in the atmosphere, carbon dioxide, has passed a long-feared milestone, scientists reported on Friday, reaching a concentration not seen on the earth for millions of years.
Now there's a story more important than Benghazi. Then again, most stories are.

National Journal:

The Coming GOP Civil War Over Climate Change

The meetings didn’t take. “[Newt] Gingrich and [Mitt] Romney understood, … and I think they even believed the evidence and understood the risk,” [MIT scientist Kerry] Emanuel says. “But they were so terrified by the extremists in their party that in the primaries they felt compelled to deny it. Which is not good leadership, good integrity. I got a low impression of them as leaders.” Throughout the Republican presidential primaries, every candidate but one—former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, who was knocked out of the race at the start—questioned, denied, or outright mocked the science of climate change.

Soon after his experience in South Carolina, Emanuel changed his lifelong Republican Party registration to independent. “The idea that you could look a huge amount of evidence straight in the face and, for purely ideological reasons, deny it, is anathema to me,” he says.

Francis X Clines:
When Mark Barden considers Adam Lanza, the young man who murdered Barden’s 7-year-old son, Daniel, and 25 others in the Sandy Hook school massacre, he is struck by what he calls “a sad parallel.” In his short life, Daniel made a habit of seeking out and befriending youngsters he spotted sitting alone, a virtue that his teachers praised at Sandy Hook Elementary.

“The young man who killed my son was the little boy that sat alone,” says Mr. Barden with rueful certainty. “Maybe if there was a little Daniel Barden that came along in his growing up, perhaps things could be different.

Newtown changed everything, and people in Newtown will continue to work for change.

John Cassidy:

If this list of organizations sounds a bit confusing, it can’t be helped, gun-control advocates say, and it doesn’t preclude effective action. “It’s not about creating a single, monolithic organization” like the N.R.A., Gross insisted. “It’s about expressing the voice of the American public—from moms to mayors to people who live in impacted communities.” Arkadi Gerney, a former head of Mayors Against Illegal Guns, who is now a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, agreed. “There is no ‘silver bullet’ organization on our side of the debate,” he wrote to me in an e-mail. “It’s going to take a bunch of actors and a lot of voices—mayors and moms, cops and faith leaders, victims and responsible gun owners—to engage. This will be less unified, less command-and-control. But it is coming together—and when it does it will represent a much broader swath of the American public than the NRA’s lobbyists could ever hope to engage.”
More politics and policy below the fold.

Politico:

The Senate voted down a gun control measure last month, but the fight is just beginning.

The National Rifle Association and new pro-gun control groups headed by former Rep. Gabby Giffords and Michael Bloomberg are in an arms race since a background check bill narrowly failed in the Senate last month – ramping up their fundraising, airing attack ads and revving up their grassroots machines.

Greg Sargent on the IRS scandal:
Mitch McConnell is calling for an investigation. In purely political terms, this is right in the conservative sweet spot — the IRS, bullying, intimidation, political thuggery, etc. We hear that stuff regularly from the conservative media, of course, and the thundering about this one will be epic. But this time, it seems entirely justified. There should be an investigation – a real one – and we should all want to follow it wherever it goes.
Completely agreed. If someone at IRS is investigating you for political reasons, fire their ass and find out what happened. Doesn't matter who occupies the WH, this is wrong.

David Quamman:

You may have seen the news about H7N9, a new strain of avian flu claiming victims in Shanghai and other Chinese locales. Influenzas always draw notice, and always deserve it, because of their great potential to catch hold, spread fast, circle the world and kill lots of people. But even if you’ve been tracking that bird-flu story, you may not have noticed the little items about a “novel coronavirus” on the Arabian Peninsula. ...

One authority at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an expert on nasty viruses, told me that the SARS outbreak was the scariest such episode he’d ever seen. That cautionary experience is one reason this novel coronavirus in the Middle East has attracted such concern.

Well, if you read Daily Kos, you already know about the little buggers.

As for H7N9, it's going to take a while for a vaccine:

Major Challenges in Providing an Effective and Timely Pandemic Vaccine for Influenza A(H7N9)
More homage to the human spirit:
The World Trade Center's rebirth has long revolved around creating a centerpiece of unsparing symbolism: a skyscraper 1,776 feet tall, its height an homage and a bold statement about looking forward.

The new 1 World Trade Center reached that height with the lowering of a silvery spire from a crane on Friday, officially taking its place as a signature of the city's skyline and, with some argument, the nation's tallest tower.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Sat May 11, 2013 at 04:30 AM PDT.

Also republished by Repeal or Amend the Second Amendment (RASA) and Shut Down the NRA.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Republicans and integrity. (19+ / 0-)

    Scientists kill me with their reality-basedness.

    “But they were so terrified by the extremists in their party that in the primaries they felt compelled to deny it. Which is not good leadership, good integrity. I got a low impression of them as leaders.”
    •  Two words that don't belong together. nt (4+ / 0-)

      Then they came for me - and by that time there was nobody left to speak up.

      by DefendOurConstitution on Sat May 11, 2013 at 04:50:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  patriotism (4+ / 0-)

      Are they exhibiting a lack of patriotism, or a are they treasonous?  That "NO" continues unabated is an indictment of the media--there are not 2 sides to this story.  Same goes for economics--the professors who warned of a debt threshold made a mathematical error--yet their hypothesis is still being trumpeted.  It is not possible that 2+2=3--but the media doesn't refute this idea whenever it arises.
      The future is bleak--if/when the Koch brothers take over the Chicago Tribune--and thus the L A Times also-- the media gets even worse.  The country no longer has an overwhelming advantage over other industrial nations, and stupid decisions have consequences.
      Back to my original question--the Republicans are either treasonous--or stupid.  Since many went to accredited universities, I gotta think they are traitors.  

      Apres Bush, le deluge.

      by melvynny on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:39:12 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Republicans are neither treasonous nor stupid. (16+ / 0-)

        They have an agenda - a long-term agenda they've been working on for 40 years, but which has become pointedly evident since 2000.  That is turning over every responsibility of the government - federal, state and local - to the private sector.  Privatization of profit and socialization of risk and loss is their Holy Grail.  Everything they espouse, every proposal they put forward, every way they approve spending government money is directed toward the private sector.  "The Commons" is anathema to these people, and the "common good" and the "general welfare" of the people is secondary to private ownership.  Their Utopia is one in which the government collects tax money and spends it through the private sector for the benefit of the private sector; whatever public good comes of the spending is only incidental to enrichment of private ownership.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:33:05 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  We have GOT to get a handle on greenhouse (11+ / 0-)

    gasses. As a matter of national security--which is about the only language people are going to understand at this point. These people who deny climate change are going to be all "whoops, sorry!" when Manhattan is under water and I promise you, when that happens the deniers are not going to be in any position to apologize or do anything. They will be punished with extreme prejudice by a panicking mob. Mark my words.

    I resent that. I demand snark, and overly so -- Markos Moulitsas.

    by commonmass on Sat May 11, 2013 at 04:38:25 AM PDT

  •  Climate Change....Immgration Reform.....Tax (10+ / 0-)

    Reform....Jobs.....DCWash's cup runneth over.

    I'll take Benghazi for $200 Alex.

    •  why (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet

      Why haven't Republicans left their party?  Are they all blind to what's happening--or are we exaggerating?  Something is very wrong with their values--this is not about politics, this is science.  This is also a replay of the church's blind eye to Copernicus and Galileo.

      Apres Bush, le deluge.

      by melvynny on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:48:18 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  What makes you think Republicans haven't (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Greg Dworkin, glitterscale

        left their party?

        Only about a quarter of the electorate identifies as Republican.
        About a third identifies as Democrat.

        The major parties have become damned hard to love.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:01:06 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  see the actual story for confirmation (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dinotrac, glitterscale, skohayes

          the MIT scientist was once a republican, now an independent. Not the only one.

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:04:03 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  sorry (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dinotrac

          I should have said --elected Republicans.  Why does Portman remain a Republican?  What about some lowly health official with a political appointment?  Hannity has enough money--why doesn't he abandon the stinking cruise liner?

          Apres Bush, le deluge.

          by melvynny on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:17:32 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  That part is easy: It's hard to get elected in the (0+ / 0-)

            United States as an independent.

            Here in Illinois, you see all manner of Democrats because that's what you have to be around here to get elected, to get the good contracts, etc.

            A Massachusetts Republican is likely to be more left-leaning than a Texas Democrat.

            Etc.

            Democrats are just as bad, but with different issues.

            How many elected Democrats, for example, would dare to mention the word unemployment when discussing anything related to immigration?

            When was the last time an elected Democrat (including Al Gore) was honest about the difficulty,cost, and impact of combating global warming?

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:22:31 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  except (0+ / 0-)

              If what you say is true--and I pretty much think it is--why haven't retired R pols come out with revelations?

              Apres Bush, le deluge.

              by melvynny on Sat May 11, 2013 at 08:43:27 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I think they have. (0+ / 0-)

                But let's be honest here ---

                The problem with being a partisan is that you can tell the truth and be utterly unconvincing. When the signal to noise ratio is too low,  filters knock out good with bad.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Sat May 11, 2013 at 10:25:38 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  Yes, but how much more of Harry Reid can you take? (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              dinotrac

              Independent looks good to some of us. Please don't HR me, Jeebus.

              What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. King Henry, scene ii

              by TerryDarc on Sat May 11, 2013 at 09:23:04 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I've been an independent for years. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                TerryDarc

                Sometime after 1980, not sure when, I stopped calling myself a Democrat.  Ronald Reagan was President, so I couldn't call myself a Republican.  (Note:  I've come to have a much higher opinion of Reagan in retrospect, just as I've come to have a higher opinion of Bill Clinton than I did at the time)

                For what it's worth, there is some very illustrious support for any American who wants to disdain political parties. From George Washington's farewell address:

                The disorders and miseries which result gradually incline the minds of men to seek security and repose in the absolute power of an individual; and sooner or later the chief of some prevailing faction, more able or more fortunate than his competitors, turns this disposition to the purposes of his own elevation, on the ruins of public liberty.

                Without looking forward to an extremity of this kind (which nevertheless ought not to be entirely out of sight), the common and continual mischiefs of the spirit of party are sufficient to make it the interest and duty of a wise people to discourage and restrain it.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Sat May 11, 2013 at 10:39:09 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  I doubt that George W saw this one coming (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  dinotrac

                  But he certainly was aware of the abuse of the many by the few. I became a democrat when Obama was running - indie before.

                  I am not now, nor was then, a fan of Reagan's but I have an increasingly high regard for Carter, e.g.  Unlike politicians, we can at least change our minds when necessary. I am quite content to revert to indie status although my state does not have open primaries.

                  Apt quote, btw.

                  What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. King Henry, scene ii

                  by TerryDarc on Sat May 11, 2013 at 01:10:33 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

      •  Blinded by partisan rage fueled by... (0+ / 0-)

        ...the continuous hammering on Fox and radio that they are personally being screwed by the government for the profit of immigrants and unworthy lazy blacks.

        Brainwashing is the word!

    •  Rand Paul makes it official: all about Hillary (9+ / 0-)

      At first the Benghazi din was all about trying to defeat Obama. Having failed at that, now it's so clearly a preemptive strike against Clinton 2016, probably to create footage they can use in wall-to-wall 24/7 ads.

      •  If Hillary runs in 2016, every ad (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        One Opinion, Egalitare

        sponsored by a Republican group will include the clip of her comment in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee, "At this point, what possible difference could it make?", with an outraged introduction to the ad and an equally outraged concluding remark.  

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:12:56 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Separating from the context... (5+ / 0-)

          ...is what transformed the "Dean Scream" from understandable (and for me endearing) celebration to "evidence" that Dean was...something "negative". Really didn't matter what that "negative" was, as long as hammering it home reinforced the negativity.

          When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

          by Egalitare on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:07:52 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Yes, my point exactly. (0+ / 0-)

            There will be no context given to the statement.  Only the words themselves and the exasperation she exhibits will be used, and no mention of the litany of stupid questions and accusations she had had to endure from the committee members before that.   It's already being used to smear her, and if she runs it will become ubiquitous.

            "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

            by SueDe on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:41:23 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  Well, Issa may now move on to IRS "scandal" to (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      aaraujo, Pinto Pony, a2nite, Laconic Lib

      look for some more political points with his rabid base.  I would certainly welcome an investigation of the IRS in relation to non-profits, especially if it means that we will review organizations that have no legitimate reason for being tax exempt like the Westboro Baptist Church.

      I think that it's not likely that Issa will let go of Benghazi in exchange for IRS investigation as Benghazi has no political risk for Republicans and looking into the IRS could open up a real can of worms that they could not control.

      Then they came for me - and by that time there was nobody left to speak up.

      by DefendOurConstitution on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:06:33 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I seem to remember reports (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DefendOurConstitution, orlbucfan

        during the Bush years of IRS investigations on liberal/progressive groups because of affiliation.  Can't recall exactly but don't remember a single Reublican crowing about it.

        Everyone! Arms akimbo!

        by tobendaro on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:14:31 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I don't remember seeing any reports along those (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          DefendOurConstitution, jds1978

          lines, but why would a Republican crow if the IRS were exercising its power to abuse political groups on the left?

          What does around comes around, and you don't want the IRS doing that kind of thing.

          LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

          by dinotrac on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:05:03 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  he should - this one has bigger appeal to more (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DefendOurConstitution

        voters.  This is a real political problem for the Democrats unless a complete investigation - and people getting fired or going to jail - well before the 2014 elections is fully transparent.

        Benghazi is nothing compared to what the IRS has done under the Obama Administration.

        •  The IRS Commissioner in charge while (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          skohayes

          this practice was in effect was a George W. Bush appointee, but apparently none of the higher-ups at the agency were aware of the practice and it was confined to bureaucrats in a special section set up to inspect 504(c)(4) applications.  But the investigation better be thorough and completely transparent.  Not that the GOP will accept the outcome of an investigation regardless of how comprehensive and public it turns out to be.

          "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

          by SueDe on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:51:42 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  No, Ezra Klein is right, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          barkingcat

          this may have been politically motivated, but it seems pretty obvious that an investigation of all these 502(c)4s need to be widened, not shut down:

          Let’s be very clear: because the Internal Revenue Service holds so much private data, and because it can make people’s lives absolutely miserable, it is of paramount importance in our political system that it both is, and is perceived as, an apolitical entity. If it discriminated against tea party groups that attempted to register as 501(c)4 social welfare organizations, then that’s a grave offense, and it needs to be investigated thoroughly and dealt with severely.
          But the particular bias people are angry about is the opposite of the bias they should be angry about. The problem wasn’t that the IRS was skeptical of tea party groups registering as 501(c)4s. It’s that it hasn’t been skeptical of Organizing for America, Crossroads GPS, Priorities USA and Heritage Action Fund registering as 501(c)4s. The IRS should be treating all these groups equally and appropriately — which would mean much more harshly.
          Instead, the IRS has permitted 501(c)4s to grow into something monstrous. And if they cower in the aftermath of this embarrassment, it might make matters even worse.
          http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

          “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

          by skohayes on Sat May 11, 2013 at 07:41:21 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  That's a much better scandal (no quotes) than (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DefendOurConstitution

        Benghazi.  It's one that should concern any ethical American who cares about the Constitution.

        Interesting that Kossacks are split on the question.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:02:58 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I Think It's Seeing All The Bush BS... (0+ / 0-)

          ...that screamed out for investigations: impeachment then and now bringing his ass to the Hague - and that didn't happen b/c the feckless Dems simply let him off the hook.

          But, no excuses in my book. Being pissed is understandable if only Dems are held responsible by the party of supposed responsibility.

          What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. King Henry, scene ii

          by TerryDarc on Sat May 11, 2013 at 09:43:58 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I seem to remember Richard Nixon running into (0+ / 0-)

            a little bit of trouble.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sat May 11, 2013 at 10:40:24 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Yeah, hijacking the electoral process will do that (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              dinotrac, Laconic Lib

              for you. I remember Reagan getting off Scot free. Cuts both ways. Clinton's (Bill) persecution by Starr and the R's is a shining example of the kind of crap that gets pulled in DC.

              That MAY have been a real turning point in the R's playbook - when they saw they no longer had to be honest in any way, shape or form and the dems just rolled over.

              What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. King Henry, scene ii

              by TerryDarc on Sat May 11, 2013 at 01:13:06 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  If he does, we'll remind him of a REAL scandal (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DefendOurConstitution

        That is the FIRING by the Bushies at the DoJ of US attorneys BECAUSE not deemed conservative enough.

        That sure beats being asked for too much additional information by the IRS...

  •  The modern GOP platform in a sentence. (8+ / 0-)

    “The idea that you could look a huge amount of evidence straight in the face and, for purely ideological reasons, deny it,..."

    It's what they are.

    Just a guy made of dots and lines.

    by BobX on Sat May 11, 2013 at 04:50:24 AM PDT

  •  According to the original AP story (8+ / 0-)

    on the on the IRS targeting of groups with tea party and patriot in their names seeking 501(c)(4) classification, titled IRS Apologizes for Targeting Tea Party Groups, the IRS Inspector General's office has been investigating the practice for the past year, and his report is due out next week.  Out of 3,400 groups applying for this new status, approximately 75 of them were contacted by the IRS requesting more information on their organizations because of their names, and none of them had their applications denied.

    While It is inappropriate that employees used particular words in a group's name to target them for special attention, it is disingenuous for writers covering this story for other news outlets to intimate that there has been no investigation into who inside the IRS is responsible for choosing the groups, who knew that particular catch words had been used to choose which groups to single out and what if any ramifications the practice had on the groups themselves.

    All of this special scrutiny of 503(c)(4) groups happened over a year ago when the agency was headed by a George W. Bush appointee who resigned last November.  I wonder if House Republicans will bother to mention that when they begin scheduling the myriad meetings they will undoubtedly hold.

    "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

    by SueDe on Sat May 11, 2013 at 04:59:35 AM PDT

    •  I suspect folks on both sides will (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SueDe

      make this about Obama- just as "Fast and Furious" was about Holder, until it wasn't.  Amazing how Bush lingers on.

      I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

      by I love OCD on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:10:27 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Seriously? Calling out George Bush? (0+ / 0-)

      The IRS is part of the Obama administration
      It is part of the department of Treasury,
      It's commissioner does serve a five year term, but the President can remove him.

      The former commissioner was confirmed by a Democratic Senate, by the way, so, if you really really want to be strict about it, he was a George Bush-Harry Reid (and friends) appointee.

      LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

      by dinotrac on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:17:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I mentioned that George Bush appointed (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        rja, Laconic Lib, Miggles

        the IRS commissioner in charge when the practice was in effect because it was part of the AP story; nobody was "calling out George Bush."  In fact, Douglas Schulman, reported to congress in 2012:

        IRS Commissioner Douglas Shulman told Congress in March 2012 that the IRS was not targeting groups based on politics.

        "There's absolutely no targeting. This is the kind of back and forth that happens to people" who apply for tax-exempt status, Shulman told a House Ways and Means subcommittee.

        The IRS said senior leaders were not aware that specific groups were being targeted at the time of the hearing.

        So how would the Obama administration be aware of the practice now coming to light, when neither the commissioner himself nor senior leaders of the agency were aware of it?

        By the way, IRS commissioners are appointed for six years, not five, which is why Schulman retired last November; his appointment at the agency had expired.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Sat May 11, 2013 at 07:57:55 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  The Coming GOP Civil War Over Climate Change is (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DefendOurConstitution

    a Deja Vu that started global warming in the first place.  At least in the sense that oil use started on a big wartime footing because of a belief in a coming war (The Battle of Armageddon) which still affects global warming ideology.

  •  Gun control is not monolithic, this is a strength (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    SueDe, Laconic Lib, Miggles

    as well as a weakness. The gun Cult is very monolithic around the singular NRA view, and being a single issue constituency they act very radically (just like the forced birthers, or pro-life people as they prefer to be called) to defend their untenable position (that easier access to more guns is the only acceptable possibility). People that advocate sensible firearms regulations tend to be people that are looking at civil rights, economic justice, better education, etc. and this makes the group much broader, but it dilutes the message that firearms regulations is an absolute necessity.

    My hope is that as the consciousness of how bad the problem is (one person shot every 5 minutes) grows this amalgamation of groups will coalesce around the justice of firearms regulations and eventually prevail over the single issue gun Cult that the NRA created (or at least exploited for their own purpose).  This will be a slow road and we must keep letting our Congress-critters know how important it is.

    Then they came for me - and by that time there was nobody left to speak up.

    by DefendOurConstitution on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:02:04 AM PDT

  •  Even Erick of Erick doesn't like Jennifer Rubin... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes
    •  How dare she criticize anything (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet

      having to do with the right-wing's determination of what's important, and particularly when her criticism is aimed personally at one of their own - although I must admit it does my old heart good to see the GOP chew on its own.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:44:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Only good thing about Jennifer Rubin (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skohayes

      is that she wants immigration reform to succeed.

      President Obama, January 9, 2012: "Change is hard, but it is possible. I've Seen it. I've Lived it."

      by Drdemocrat on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:49:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Gawd, the comments (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet, Laconic Lib
      What I heard was that his thesis was fully approved by the powers to be based upon empirical data and so his conclusion was sound. It was based upon science and not bias.
      So what is the controversy with the conclusion of Mr. Richwine’s research?
      Clearly this Rubin woman has not spent any time around illegal aliens.
       photo picard-facepalm.jpg

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Sat May 11, 2013 at 07:51:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Gun Violance, Climate Change Are Issues? Really! (3+ / 0-)

    Sure doing something about gun violence could save thousands of lives a year, and doing something about climate change could help save the human race from extinction.  But come on these issues pale in comparison to the GOP issues of the alleged Bengazi cover-up and the IRS targeting of Tea Party groups.  Now those are "real" issues that [crazy] Americans care about.

    "Some men see things as they are and ask, 'Why?' I dream of things that never were and ask, 'Why not?"

    by Doctor Who on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:13:16 AM PDT

    •  I assume more WILL care about the IRS (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      koNko

      (apparent) wrong-doing than about gun violence (yawn - been happening for decades as anyone who watches local news on TV or listens to local news radio or reads newspapers knows) or Benghazi (too hard to understand for many - other than (their "take") Obama/Hillary/libruls covered up something to get past the election.

      The idea of the IRS targeting groups for special scrutiny based on their political views scares the sh*t out of most taxpayers on all points of the political spectrum.  That's what tyrannical governments do (among other things) - use the vast power and resources of the government to punish its opponents and enemies.

      This is what Nixon did - misused the IRS against his enemies.  

      We absolutely need to investigate the hell out of this and get the facts and fire / prosecute people if they broke the law.

      •  This might surprise you. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Laconic Lib

        http://www.dailykos.com/...

        Because the Commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service during the period in question was Douglas Shulman, a political appointee of President George W. Bush.

        In fact, not only was Commissioner Shulman a Bush appointee, he would certainly have had no motivation to do the political bidding of a Democrat president considering that Mr. Shulman had already announced prior to the election that he would be stepping down from his post in November.

        "The human eye is a wonderful device. With a little effort, it can fail to see even the most glaring injustice." Richard K. Morgan

        by sceptical observer on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:03:40 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Then he's a mole (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          sceptical observer

          probably did it to smear the Obama administration on his way out.  It's not beneath these GOP rat fucks to try something like that.

          This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

          by DisNoir36 on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:18:50 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  The IRS is independent and has nothing to (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            skohayes, sceptical observer

            do with the Obama administration.

            Any hearings will clearly show that the Obama administration had nothing to do with some idiots in Cincinatti who flagged the wrong thing when they were trying to work on nonprofits.

            President Obama, January 9, 2012: "Change is hard, but it is possible. I've Seen it. I've Lived it."

            by Drdemocrat on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:51:04 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  He had nothing to do with it (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            sceptical observer

            It was started by some low level employees in Cincinnati.

            Lerner said the practice was initiated by low-level workers in Cincinnati and was not motivated by political bias. After her talk, she told The AP that no high level IRS officials knew about the practice.
            http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

            “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

            by skohayes on Sat May 11, 2013 at 07:54:18 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Are you kidding me? Read the AP report. (0+ / 0-)

            The IRS Inspector General has been investigating the practice of targeting specific groups for the past year.  Don't assume things that make you look like an ass.

            "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

            by SueDe on Sat May 11, 2013 at 08:01:00 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  Pleasantly Surprised (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          sceptical observer

          Since he obviously wouldn't have gone along with someone in the Obama administration telling him to target these groups, it sounds like it is either an innocent screening tool that IRS staff applies to a number of groups (besides the Tea Party), or a group of over-zealous IRS staff members of a Dem. persuasion (possibly some of our fellow Kossacks) trying to help out.

          "Some men see things as they are and ask, 'Why?' I dream of things that never were and ask, 'Why not?"

          by Doctor Who on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:23:38 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  During a conversation with a teabagging wingnut (7+ / 0-)

    arguing about background checks:

    Me: "Do you believe that every law abiding American citizen should be allowed to purchase and carry a firearm?"

    Teabagger: "Of course I do!  It's their right under the second amendment of the Constitution."

    Me: "How do you know who is a law abiding American citizen?"

    Teabagger: "Obama has no right to take our guns away!"

    I thought I'd share this...just because I never did get an answer to my question, even though I asked it several times.

    "With all due respect, that's a bunch of malarky". - V.P. Joe Biden

    by Taxmancometh on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:15:35 AM PDT

    •  Here is something quieting down teabaggers (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      a2nite, Laconic Lib, Miggles

      I got this about the 2nd Amendment from a past diary, and every time I have used it in a reply to a gun nut, I have NEVER heard ANYTHING back.

      From the Tennessee Supreme Court (1840): "A man in pursuit of deer, elk and buffaloes might carry his rifle every day for forty years, and yet it would never be said of him that he had borne arms."

      From the Texas Supreme Court (1872):
      "The word 'arms' in the connection we find it in the Constitution of the United States refers to the arms of a militiaman or soldier, and the word is used in its military sense."

      The people of 1840 and 1872 had a language much closer to the Founders than the 2008 Roberts Court... And from the fact that it comes from TN and TX...

  •  I'm tired of the death threats..... (10+ / 0-)

        A gun nut at my work likes to ape Limbaugh, Malikin, O'Reilly, et. al.    He likes to blather about "killing all the liberals".   He has others carry these threats to me.  (His wife is a lawyer.   Did she advise him to do it indirectly, so he can deny it?)

        I work for the Air Force.  At our annual  "Please don't commit suicide" meeting last year, he cheerfully contributed:

      "I'm never going to commit suicide!  I'm going to get my guns and kill a lot of people!"    

         Apparently he does not realize that all paths forward from that are basically.. suicide.

          My supervisor took quick, public action.   He shit his pants.

          Personally, I don't care if someone owns a tank.   Its the psychos that like to flaunt their 'power' .. that we have no way of dealing with as a society.  

          Other than keeping mass murder weapons out of their hands.

  •  Effective vaccines (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DefendOurConstitution, koNko
    Major Challenges in Providing an Effective and Timely Pandemic Vaccine for Influenza A(H7N9)
    Yes, effective vaccines do seem to be a problem these days, such as in regards to the pertussis vaccination (a part of DTaP):
    Washington state has one of the highest exemption rates in the nation. But the CDC said that does not appear to be a major factor in the outbreak, since most of the youngsters who got sick had been vaccinated.

    It is especially hitting a higher number of vaccinated 13 to 14 year olds, which was not the case in past years. This is after five rounds of shots up to age 12.

    •  no doubt the new vaccine (acellular) (3+ / 0-)

      does not appear to be as effective as the older one, which was associated with more side effects. Boosters are needed.

      However, the benefit of vaccine in this particular illness, different than others, is to keep babies from getting it. Parents of newborns NEED to be vaccinated. Children NEED to be vaccinated to protect their younger siblings.

      The drop in pertussis rates since the vax was originally introduced is unquestioned. tetanus is rare. We don't see diphtheria (the DPT for babies). But a more effective pertussis vax would be welcome news.

      PS natural infection doesn't make you pertussis proof either.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:28:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Boosters (0+ / 0-)

        Or, we might be creating a vaccine-resistant strain that researchers are calling P3, which actually produces more pertussis toxin.

        This might explain why a higher percentage of vaccinated children are getting whooping cough than the non-vaccinated children. In Washington, there was enough of a sample size of non-vaccinated children to make a statistical comparison between the two groups.

        And, getting whooping cough does not make you immune to getting it again, but natural-acquired immunity is stronger and does last longer.

        The drop is pertussis is not unquestioned. 40,000 cases were reported in 1959. That was the high water mark for the last 50 years. We are already up over 18,000 and it is forecasted to reach more than 40,000 cases by the end of the year. This is with a population in which the vaccinated children (ranging from 80% to 88% of the population depending on how many vaccines you count) are getting whooping cough at a higher rate than non-vaccinated children.

        Based on the trends, pertussis is cyclical in nature, so we should expect it to drop into a dormant period. But, only time will tell if we have created a bigger problem with this new strain.

        •  ... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          tb mare

          document those claims with links.

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:21:42 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Which claim? (0+ / 0-)

            So many undocumented claims. Where does one start?

            Boosters are needed.
            Parents of newborns NEED to be vaccinated.
            Children NEED to be vaccinated to protect their younger siblings.
            The drop in pertussis rates since the vax was originally introduced is unquestioned.
            But a more effective pertussis vax would be welcome news.
            natural infection doesn't make you pertussis proof either.
            My research came from the CDC, Frontline, Wall Street Journal, and Huffington Post. I've played that game with you before:  Whatever my source, impeach the credentials. The data is out there and is not difficult to locate.
        •  the data i am aware of finds (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          tb mare

          that there are some reported cases of vaccine resistance, but nothing about cause and effect, or the idea that "we created" a "bigger problem".

          here's a good link for our readers:

          http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/...

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:28:51 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  At least five Pennsylvania state-owned (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes, a2nite, Laconic Lib, Miggles

    universities are now allowing guns on campus after thestate’s lawyers concluded that an outright ban on weapons was likely unconstitutional.

    Way to go PA, terrorize the non-gun wielders and the students who attend college to learn.  We know the students with guns are the "good guys with a gun".


    The religious fanatics didn't buy the republican party because it was virtuous, they bought it because it was for sale

    by nupstateny on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:43:41 AM PDT

  •  Political parties are terrible for data driven (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, skohayes

    people.

    They like science when it fits.
    Hate it when it doesn't.

    As the Republican war on science is well-handled here, let me add this:

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/...

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:56:02 AM PDT

    •  Hello Soviet Communist Party...Goodbye Soviet (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dinotrac

      Communist Party.

    •  I'm with ya (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dinotrac, skohayes, a2nite

      see anti-vax discussions.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:06:50 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  however, note Rs have a party bias, often (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dinotrac, skohayes, a2nite

      written into their platform  and enshrined in their primaries (raise your hand if you believe in global warming) but D's  don't do that. And it's not a conservative bias, it's a Republican bias.

      IOW, all Republicans are Republicans but not all leftists are Democrats. Thinking that all leftists are Democrats is something Republicans do.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:15:25 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's been so long since I've read a party platform (0+ / 0-)

        You could well be right about that.

        I think it was  1992, at Bill Clinton's Chicago headquarters.  I was thinking about volunteering.

        Ended up volunteering for Perot instead.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:25:18 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  to put it more bluntly (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dinotrac, koNko, skohayes, a2nite

      in this case the criticism is directed at Republicans not conservatives, and the criticism is (some) leftists not Democrats.

      You,. my friend, need to be as careful of separating out the leftists and D's as you are about conservatives and R's.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:17:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I understand the difference perfectly well... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Greg Dworkin

        And, ahem, I will take you on your word for understanding the difference between conservatives and Republicans, but that makes you a very small minority on this site.

        I will admit that Republicans have been whacked over the head by the whole Tea Party thing.  I have no good empirical way to be sure, but I can believe that they are more crazed and unprincipled than Democrats at present.

        Living in Illinois, however, doesn't make it very easy to believe that.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:29:48 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  There are creationists among (0+ / 0-)

      Democrats, for sure. There is an anti-science faction among Democratic voters (anti-vaxxers, animal rights groups, ignorance about agriculture, etc.), but you don't see that carry over into our politicians like you do on the right.
      For example, our legislature here in Kansas passed an anti-Sharia law last year. Not because we have a large population of Muslims, or any other reason connected to reality, mind you.
      What they don't realize is that Sharia is remarkably close to the laws found in Leviticus and the 610 Commandments God handed down to Moses.
      They're merely religious laws to guide things like marriage and divorce, diet, punishment for transgressions, etc.
      Similar to what Huckabee would like to see in place of the Constitution, actually.

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Sat May 11, 2013 at 08:12:40 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You don't? (0+ / 0-)

        Interesting.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sat May 11, 2013 at 10:49:39 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Science? (0+ / 0-)

        I guess I am an anti-vaxxer, if you are defining it as someone who believes we should consider the data rather than just take the word of the pharmaceutical companies that everything is safe.

        Let me ask you a question, how is trusting the safety of a drug like Vioxx any different than trusting the safety of the MMR vaccine? They both have side effects including causing death.

        Should we trust vaccines because a guy like Greg Dworkin gets on this website and promotes vaccines, even though he has a financially-vested interest in them?

        Do you think that Merck all of the sudden grew a conscience when it came to one product vs. the other?

        Just so you have a background on me, I have two advanced degrees including a PhD in statistics. I also am an atheist. I have participated in setting up experimental design studies on drugs and vaccines.

        Anti-vaxxers have a higher level of education than the parents that let pediatricians treat their kids like a science experiment.

        •  Drugs are foreign substances (0+ / 0-)

          we put into our bodies to treat a disease or a symptom. All drugs have side effects, for  that reason you should always be careful of what drugs you take and for what reason.
          Vaccines on the other hand, have been extensively tested and used for several decades. We know that they work and are effective on a majority of the population without causing a severe reaction.
          I trust vaccines because as a veterinary technician I see them protect animals from all kinds of nasty diseases (like parvo in dogs, or erysipelas in pigs). Millions upon millions of people and animals have been vaccinated for various diseases and only a small percentage have a severe reaction, but it does happen. We take these risks, because the benefits of the vaccine (babies and puppies not dying from preventable diseases) outweigh the risks.
          To call giving your child or dog a vaccine a "science experiment" ignores reality.

          “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

          by skohayes on Sat May 11, 2013 at 01:38:17 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Vaccines are not made up of foreign substances? (0+ / 0-)

            A study in Spain compared vaccinated sheep with unvaccinated ones for bluetongue:

            However, Spanish animal pathology researcher,  Lluís Luján, was concerned with serious health problems in sheep following mass vaccination to combat bluetongue, a viral disease spread by insects. So, a study was done to compare vaccinated versus unvaccinated sheep. The results should concern everyone. Though the percentages of affected sheep varied widely, as many as 100% of some flocks were devastated by the vaccine-induced disease called autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).
            Document those claims!
            Compare bluetongue with the devastating effects of its vaccine, and it doesn’t make much sense to be vaccinating against it. If a sheep has been infected and survives, then that sheep will be fine. However, when a sheep gets ASIA, then that sheep has a death sentence—and the reality is that it doesn’t appear to be any more likely that sheep will be harmfully infected with bluetongue than that they’ll be hit with ASIA from the vaccination.
            The five sheep with advanced ASIA all had over 260 ng/mL of aluminum in their blood. The control animals only had trace amounts of aluminum in their blood.

            And, yes aluminum is a FOREIGN SUBSTANCE.

            So, based on this data, does it make sense to stop vaccinating for bluetongue in sheep?

            •  Yes, the adjuvants are used (0+ / 0-)

              to stimulate the immune system into a response.
              Obviously, there are foreign substances in vaccines.
              No, we should not stop vaccinating against bluetongue in sheep, where the virus exists.
              The animals mentioned on your web site had been repeatedly vaccinated, which is not a normal procedure for vaccines.

              The present report is the first description of a new sheep syndrome (ovine ASIA syndrome) linked to multiple, repetitive vaccination

              “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

              by skohayes on Sun May 12, 2013 at 08:06:09 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  That was because the vaccine was not working (0+ / 0-)
                No, we should not stop vaccinating against bluetongue in sheep, where the virus exists.
                Incredible.

                You want to continue to substitute a terrible death of ASIA syndrome to the sheep rather than accept a benign disease that they recover from.

                You fail to see the insanity in that?

                So, I think we agree that over-vaccinating is a bad thing (dead sheep). Can we agree that having a build up of aluminum in the blood stream is not a good thing either?

                If so, what level is acceptable?
                Under 260 ng/mL? Under 100 ng/mL?

                Sounds like a chemistry experiment to me. And, you still fail to see why I have a problem vaccinating children with over 53 vaccinations before they are six years old?

        •  one of the ways we know you're full of shit (0+ / 0-)

          is that you make wild unsupported accusations. You say I have a financial vested interest?

          Document it.

          Of course, you can't.

          Anti-vaxxers have a higher level of education than the parents that let pediatricians treat their kids like a science experiment.
          I'll let that, and your other comments, speak for themselves.

          But, readers, take note.

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 11, 2013 at 01:56:35 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  What a wonderful bedside manner... (0+ / 0-)

            Here

            As compared with the undervaccinated children, the unvaccinated children were more likely to be male, to be white, to belong to households with higher income, to have a married mother with a college education, and to live with four or more other children
            And here
            More educated parents are less likely to vaccinate, which contradicts the misconceptions of many health professionals who profess that parents don't vaccinate because they are under-educated, poor or misinformed.
            Another finding published in the journal PLoS Medicine, showed that parents with more education were less likely to let their daughters get HPV shots. It also adds to a growing body of evidence that suggests vaccination efforts are being rightfully eroded not by people who are under-educated, but by upper-middle class folks with degrees.
            Run away and hide once again, Greg.
  •  I'm having a hard time with this from the NJ (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    koNko, skohayes, Laconic Lib
    “This is an important issue for the Republican Party,” Roberta Combs says. “At one point in time, this was a Republican issue, but Democrats took it over.”
    At what time did the Republicans champion climate change?  Or is this woman referring broadly to the fact that it was the Nixon administration that created the EPA?

    If that's her tack, then despite her concern about the climate she is still sticking her head in the sand - even though a Republican president had a hand in creating the EPA, the following Republican president (not counting Ford's caretaker stint) started the process of trying to destroy the EPA, right down to blaming air pollution on trees.

    A Republican issue at one time?  WHEN????

    •  My lame attempt to decode this (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skohayes, Laconic Lib

      First, claiming either party has bragging rights to have championed the issue and therefore ownership is ridiculous.

      If founding the EPA under a Republican administration means they birth the baby, I can only reply they were negligent parents that abandoned the child and now trying their best to murder the offspring.

      What can be said is:

      - there was a time when moderate Republicans were not rabidly anti-science before caving in to the willfully ignorant far Right wing of their party

      - some (a few) Republicans supported clean energy policies (particularly when it meant tax subsidies, incentives and investment in their states, particularly bio-fuel in the corn belt)

      - there are still a few you can count on one hand that do when they are not walking backward with duct tape covering their mouths

      - a bipartisan energy bill, "McCain-Leiberman" was co-sponsored by a Republican but defeated by majority Nays from Republicans and Blue Dog Dems while a majority of Dems supported it.

      - When McCain ran for President climate change and incentives (not regulations) were part of his platform

      - various Republicans in state offices have supported legislation including some, such as Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger, who actually could claim to have championed this in their states, but they are a small minority

      However, we should differentiate, perhaps, between Republican politicians pandering to the Right with actual Republican voter sentiments.

      On that account, there is actually more (but declining) support, and although it has always been weaker then Dem support, it's significant and something that could be built on.

      Why I suppose she made that claim is the fear, by Republican supporters such as herself, that Dems will use it as a wedge issue with young voters to further fragment the Republican Party (and they should).

      But I think this:

      If claiming bragging rights helps her to convince some of her fellow Republicans to move to the center and support Climate Change legislation, then have at it lady.

      Because I don't really care if people support it because they believe the science or believe Jesus want's them to or think it's a clever political move, as long as they support it.

      It's not a partisan issue, it's a survival issue.

      400ppm : what about my daughter's future?

      by koNko on Sat May 11, 2013 at 07:34:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Court Jester round-up (3+ / 0-)

    If you haven't seen The Daily Show's series John Oliver in Australia, you are missing some great arguments for sensible, sane gun control, particularly those put forth by former PB John Howard and his Conservative Party colleagues.

    Part 1 : Gun Control Whoop-de-doo

    Part 2 : Gun Control & Political Suicide

    Part 3 : Australia & Gun Control's Aftermath

    400ppm : what about my daughter's future?

    by koNko on Sat May 11, 2013 at 06:23:26 AM PDT

  •  This pretty much sums up the entire GOP (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    koNko, a2nite, Miggles

    "Look a huge amount of evidence straight in the face and, for purely ideological reasons, deny it"

  •  There will be NO civil war in the GOP over climate (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    koNko, skohayes

    In order for there to be a civil war, you need to have two factions that have the willingness to die for their beliefs. The Christianist TeaBirchers who control the ideological levers of the GOP are certainly willing to die for their beliefs—that's what refusing to accept reality will eventually do—but there is not a single scintilla of evidence—NONE—that there is any Republican with even the tiniest bit of national influence with the balls to tell the Christianist TeaBirchers that they're all fucking ignorant loons.

    What will happen is what's already happening. Quietly, without any media fanfare, in ones and twos and threes, those few sane or moderate Republicans who are left are abandoning their party. At the same time, as many thousands of young Americans join the voter rolls each month, the number of those who look at the GOP as a party of loons, quacks, lunatics, and backward reactionaries increases.

    In particular, the fastest-growing minority group in America right now are of Asian descent. Like all other groups of people in the world, the many cultures of Asia have a deep reverence for learning and science, and a quick glance at the makeup of graduate programs in the sciences and technology at virtually every major university in the country shows a heavy participation of students from China, South Korea, India, Pakistan, Taiwan, Singapore, and everywhere in between. Many of these students will return to their countries of origin after they graduate, but plenty will remain here and start families as American citizens. The number of these new Americans who will support a political party controlled by people who believe that Adam and Eve had vegetarian dinosaurs for neighbors in the Garden of Eden 5,000 years ago is so small as to be statistically irrelevant. The slow-motion suicide of the Republican Party will continue, and with gradually increasing acceleration over the next two decades. I can't think of a single instance in any western democracy when a major political party has allowed itself to be taken over by religious extremists who are fundamentally hostile to true education and science. It's unique.

    •  Asian Americans (3+ / 0-)

      Are not the largest minority group, but following African Americans, they have the highest percentage of Democrats, followed by Latinos (a numerically larger group, hence the focus).

      Why? In addition to the Confucian value for education and knowledge and respect for science, they also have strong family and community values so are motivated to support the basic foundation of the Dem platform.

      And in states or areas where they have numbers, such as California, they are finally becoming more politically involved and a force to be reckoned with, and I'm proud to say some of the most progressive voices are Asian. People like Tammy Duckworth and Goodwin Liu will be great leaders as they come up because they are principled and motivated.

      It's funny, but when I came to the US in the 1980s, people tended to assume Asians were politically conservative because we tended to be socially conservative, but I always thought that was strange since most of the Asians I knew we actually quite liberal (except then new Vietnamese who were roughly analogous to Cubans, politically).

      But young Asians, who tend to be even better educated than their parents (good work, Tiger Mom) are even more liberal and now finding the voice their immigrant parents were afraid to express.

      So, yeah, I feel hopeful that when millennials begin to mature and raise families (and vote more) they will be majority Dem, and I think that goes for all ethnic groups.

      There is a good reason Republicans that can read numbers are worried about the base, it's withering.

      Keep pushing, people.

      400ppm : what about my daughter's future?

      by koNko on Sat May 11, 2013 at 07:55:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The GOP anti-science, bigots who trash the country (0+ / 0-)

    for their corporate overlords.

  •  global warming and gun control - two issues (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Miggles

    totally polluted by a think tank-fed talk radio monopoly that continues to piggyback and depend on many of the largest universities in the country.

    This is a list of 76 universities for Rush Limbaugh that endorse global warming denial, racism, sexism, and GOP lies by broadcasting sports on over 170 Limbaugh radio stations.

    by certainot on Sat May 11, 2013 at 10:02:11 AM PDT

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