Skip to main content

Half a century. That's how long I've been knocking about this mortal coil as of today. Fifty years old may seem young to some and old to others, but to me it seems just right. Maybe it's the Greek in me, but I've never had a problem with the idea of growing older. In the Greek culture, it's considered an honor to give young people council as the older, wiser family member. Now, no one's asked me for any advice lately, but if they should, I'd be happy to settle down in my chair, worry beads in hand, and dispense the following observations about life which I've accumulated during my fifty trips around the sun. Please feel free to add your own life lessons in the comments. Yasou!

1. There are billions of different people in the world, but there are only a few different types of people.

2. Belief in gods is a testament to the spectacular limitations of the human imagination.

3. Women hoping to have a meaningful relationship with a man must hold off having sex until they get to know their partner. It doesn't matter how liberated or modern women are--men don't respect women who sleep with them too soon. Unfortunately, no amount of legislation or protesting will change this.

4. Teenagers act menacing and secretive, but inside they are scared and unsure of themselves.

5. You can never go wrong treating people with respect, whether you like them or not.

6. Crazy people are often sexy, charming, vivacious, creative, funny, and attractive. They are to be avoided at all costs.

7. In the global scheme of national maturity, America is a toddler among adults.

8. Many Christians are smart and many are stupid. However, most atheists are smart.

9. Before physical abuse comes psychological and emotional abuse. We must learn to label and respond to abuse before it gets physical.

10. Animals are inherently innocent and beautiful. It's the influence of people that makes them evil and ugly.

11. Extraterrestrials mean us no harm. If they did, they would have wiped us out by now.

12. The U.S. public education system is and always has been broken for a reason. An uneducated population is a compliant population--easier to manipulate and control. This is why early training in critical thinking is so lacking, and so necessary.

13. The tendency toward addiction is independent of substance or activity. Once addictive desire is ignited in the brain, whether in response to alcohol, gambling, shopping, relationships, or anything else, a lifelong battle has begun.

14. There is much the government is not telling us, but not as much as conspiracy theorists believe there is.

15. We are taught as we grow up that the only way we will succeed is by doing our best. Then, as adults, we are surrounded by mediocrity that is rewarded handsomely.

16. Great art is produced by great artists who are not necessarily great people.

17. There is nothing sexier than a man who can dance well.

18. There is a fine line between antique and junk.

19. Wanton cursing is a hallmark of the inarticulate. But selective cursing can be a potent tool of the shrewd.

20. Make love as though it's the last time you will ever see your partner. It may well be.

21. The purpose of a college education is not to teach you how to do something--it's to teach you how to think.

21. For proof that the United States is not the greatest country on the planet, just visit any other country.

22. You can change the world, and the course of human events, just by channelling positive energy out into the universe.

23. Those who declare, "Just give me a week with that kid and I'll straighten him out," say so secure in the knowledge that they will never have to make good on their threat.

24. Marriage is the only endeavour in which people are considered more expert the fewer times they do it.

25. No matter how bad things get, they could always get worse. Sometimes just being able to close your eyes in sleep at the end of the day is a sign of triumph.

UPDATE: The rec list. I'm honored. Thanks, one and all. Best birthday present ever!

Originally posted to Greek Goddess on Wed May 15, 2013 at 10:53 AM PDT.

Also republished by Community Spotlight.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (135+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sfbob, cassandracarolina, Hohenzollern, Louisiana 1976, Glen The Plumber, asterkitty, commonmass, Syoho, etbnc, Calvino Partigiani, Sun Tzu, kevinpdx, Radiowalla, buddabelly, wader, karmsy, Youffraita, Kevskos, gizmo59, ColoTim, Lying eyes, mcgee85, one of 8, NonnyO, Gardener in PA, timethief, suspiciousmind, Diana in NoVa, Publius2008, DianeinWA, peglyn, salmo, California06, Aaa T Tudeattack, Patience is Not a Virtue, mygreekamphora, Troubadour, SteelerGrrl, The grouch, profundo, Nimbus, akmk, Habitat Vic, Fe Bongolan, artisan, MarkInSanFran, CroneWit, Dark UltraValia, Thinking Fella, scotslass, doingbusinessas, IndyinDelaware, chantedor, boudi08, TheDuckManCometh, slowbutsure, Chitown Charlie, catilinus, WI Deadhead, rodentrancher, OLinda, riverlover, Fe, tomhodukavich, Joy of Fishes, Fairlithe, ridemybike, nolagrl, fiddler crabby, BusyinCA, Lefty Ladig, roonie, hulibow, ItsaMathJoke, Larsstephens, shesaid, ladybug53, lovespiral, flumptytail, Cobbler, Themistoclea, dewtx, jguzman17, YellerDog, Ray Pensador, chmood, ERTBen, blueoasis, This old man, radarlady, Superskepticalman, daveygodigaditch, penguins4peace, pundit, stlsophos, lulusbackintown, envwq, GoGoGoEverton, ipaman, Anthony Page aka SecondComing, Julia Grey, rubyclaire, JayC, LibChicAZ, kerplunk, Skennet Boch, Hirodog, Regina in a Sears Kit House, LucyTooners, JBL55, mzinformed, Ed in Montana, cececville, zooecium, alicia, LnGrrrR, nancat357, johanus, LamontCranston, jamess, SharonColeman, K S LaVida, psyched, sujigu, radical simplicity, wild hair, Frankenoid, kj in missouri, bewild, foresterbob, SuWho, Cronesense, melo, Debby, jerrypw

    Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

    by Greek Goddess on Wed May 15, 2013 at 10:53:29 AM PDT

  •  Happy birthday... (51+ / 0-)

    kid.

    I was 50 once. The next thing you'll be learning, I suspect, is that time doesn't pass at a uniform rate. After 50 it picks up speed. After 55 it picks up speed faster. And after 60, you'll need a seat belt.

    One upside of the above is that there is absolutely NO opportunity to become bored.

  •  I'm almost as old as you, (16+ / 0-)

    and while I agree with many of your observations, I call THIS sexist framing:

    It doesn't matter how liberated or modern women are--men don't respect women who sleep with them too soon.
    It promotes the antiquated and misogynist notion that a woman's "respectability" is somehow linked to her personal sexual conduct.

    It's baggage the culture needs to shake ASAP.

    It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

    by karmsy on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:01:37 AM PDT

    •  Agreed--the culture should shake it. (8+ / 0-)

      However, sadly, it hasn't. What is and what should be are, unfortunately, still very far apart. I don't believe that society, as a whole, continues to see women's "respectability" as linked to her personal sexual conduct. But I do believe that many individual men do, much to my, and every other thinking person's, frustration.

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:05:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You say "too many" men still subscribe (9+ / 0-)

        to these antiquated and misogynistic views on sexuality. So?

        Is "bagging" such a sexist and stunted man, any kind of prize? Is it something we should want, or strive for?  

        The original point in your diary, and your defense of it, still trouble me.

        It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

        by karmsy on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:16:24 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Not at all. Far from it. (9+ / 0-)

          All my life I've heard men of all ages talking about women, and the overwhelming attitude they have for a woman who "puts out" (not my term, by the way) too soon (again, a subjective measure) is contempt. Not all men feel this way, I hasten to add. But enough do that I feel I can say, from my own observation, that it is a prevalent attitude.

          Do I agree with it? Of course not. Do I like it? Hell, no! Does my disagreeing with it and not liking it make it not so? Sadly, no. I offer my observations only, not my endorsements.

          What have your observations been? Not your preferences for how things should be, but your observations of how things actually are?

          Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

          by Greek Goddess on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:24:10 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  in fact quite the reverse (11+ / 0-)
            Not all men feel this way,
            I am happy to be faithful to my long time sweetie who has never been shy about intimacy from the very start.  There are many things that have drawn us to together and a refreshing lack of gameplaying around intimacy is one of them.
          •  Again, I'm wondering, who cares if (11+ / 0-)

            "most men" really want women who are virgins, or whatever? Is it the "present reality"? If you're content with what "they" tell you about reality, then I guess it is. OK, listen to the traditional-gender-role propagandists: besides a general aversion to "slutty" women, men don't like "old" women, either. Indeed, many men absolutely swear they'd never look seriously at a woman past 40 as dating material. So the gender-role propagandists spin this as "everybody" supposedly wanting a hot young trophy, and not just for childbearing. This ubiquitous (and culturally amplified) propaganda has it that a woman who's "old" has supposedly seen her sexual and romantic prospects "dry up." But, scratch the surface a bit: women in midlife attract plenty of sexual interest. Based on my experience, and on long observation, mature women who are interested in doing so, have zero problem finding men to date. Being "old" is no bar in the area of relationships. I'm arguing that being "slutty" is no bar, either. No matter what "they" say.

            Yes, a lot of the culture is very sexist. I am not so thick-skinned that I haven't registered the dripping misogyny in advertising, movies, the corporate media, and the conversation of men in my earshot. But I know there are very different realities than the "official" one available to women (and anyone) willing to scratch the surface. The "surface," in regard to these particular issues, isn't so interesting. Not to me.

            Why give it air time?

            BTW, an excellent book, one that has really expanded my sexual thinking, is "The Ethical Slut," by Dossie Easton. Dossie, admittedly, is pretty wild. You may not go as far as she does in her sexual expression. But the book is guaranteed to make you think.

            It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

            by karmsy on Wed May 15, 2013 at 12:27:17 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Thanks for the book recommendation. (9+ / 0-)

              I'm always up for things that make me think. Like this discussion--thank you for making it so spirited. I'm inspired to do a longer diary on the state of gender relations in the infancy of the twenty-first century.

              Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

              by Greek Goddess on Wed May 15, 2013 at 12:34:22 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  Heartily disagree (7+ / 0-)
              Indeed, many men absolutely swear they'd never look seriously at a woman past 40 as dating material.
              Most healthy men past 40 view women over 40 as very sexy and desirable.  Sure, about 15% or so of us are unhealthy assholes, but most men I know tend to find women their own age the most attractive.

              Scissors cut paper/Paper covers rock/Rock crushes lizard/Lizard poisons Spock/Spock smashes scissors/Scissors decapitate lizard/Lizard eats paper/Paper disproves Spock/Rock breaks scissors/Spock vaporizes rock

              by jgkojak on Wed May 15, 2013 at 01:40:56 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Like I said above (4+ / 0-)

                the personal views/behavior of many men regarding the sexual desirability of women, are totally at odds with what men are "supposed" to want, per the (well-amplified) "traditional-gender-role propagandists."

                You've scratched the surface of the mystique. That's all any feminist would ever ask.

                It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

                by karmsy on Wed May 15, 2013 at 02:01:15 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Oh, and BTW: (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  socindemsclothing, Greek Goddess

                  By your own estimation, 15% of men over 40 shun women their own age. This is still quite a high number of men :) and can seem higher still if men in this 15% are constantly catered-to in advertising and entertainment, and all other areas of the culture.

                  We have to knock the legs out from under the lie.

                  It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

                  by karmsy on Wed May 15, 2013 at 02:06:16 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

              •  Well here's some data from okcupid- (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                karmsy, Greek Goddess

                http://blog.okcupid.com/...

                Seems that men on that site do prefer women significantly younger than themselves- not sure how typical their attitude is. Maybe there are better polls out there, this is just what came up on google.

                •  Haven't checked out the link. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Greek Goddess

                  Don't know whether the gathering of the data, represents a "sampling bias," which would serve to cast doubt on the finding, itself.

                  Whether the finding is flawed, or represents the preferences of "average" men well (and I wonder about that), there's a problem.

                  There's no denying the results are troubling.

                  It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

                  by karmsy on Wed May 15, 2013 at 05:10:59 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                •  Maybe the appropriate interpretation of the data (5+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Greek Goddess, ladybug53, karmsy, Chi, zooecium

                  is that the majority of men who utilize OKCupid are assholes...?

                  Bipartisan usually means that a larger-than-usual deception is being carried out. -George Carlin

                  -7.88, -7.64

                  by socindemsclothing on Wed May 15, 2013 at 06:23:01 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  No idea- I did check their wiki page- (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    karmsy, Greek Goddess

                    seems like basically an online dating and social networking site. Maybe more open emphasis on physical attractiveness- but let's face it, that's usually a factor whether or not people state it openly.

                    •  I know a few people who have been very happy (3+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      Greek Goddess, karmsy, gramofsam1

                      with the outcome of their time spent on OkCupid, so there are at least a few gems strewn among the a-holes.  

                      I've never had great success there...it's a free site, and free sites have a tendency to attract people who are only partially, if at all, invested in the pursuit of a long-term, monogamous relationship.  A lot of the guys there, at least IME, are dipping their toe in the dating pool while trolling for casual sex.  I wouldn't recommend it to anyone who's serious about dating.

                      Bipartisan usually means that a larger-than-usual deception is being carried out. -George Carlin

                      -7.88, -7.64

                      by socindemsclothing on Wed May 15, 2013 at 06:57:33 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Well I'm a fan of match.com- (1+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        Greek Goddess

                        not for myself, online dating was way in the future when I was single. But my daughter met her husband there 8 years ago, and he's a pretty terrific guy. The other guys she'd met there were, in her opinion, pretty nice guys too. She was very honest about being interested in a serious relationship, and she'd already adopted two kids, so maybe that screened out a lot of players.

                      •  Two comments... (2+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        Greek Goddess, zooecium

                        1. I may be an outlier- I met my wife on OKCupid when I was in my high 30's.  I tried match.com, and you don't get what you pay more for.  I used OKCupid. I can argue that I stopped dating after that (got married) b/c OKCupid had a better matching algorithm. Am I representative? Who knows?

                        2. As far as the statistics of older men who are dating, it's a self-selected pool, not random. This group excludes all of the men who are not dating at 40 or 50 or 60  b/c they're married or in a stable relationship. Of course there are bound to be more men in that group not interested in or maybe not capable of or for whatever reason just not yet ready for a serious relationship. There are also more women in that category as well. More, but not all. Some move on to being ready for a stable relationship, and some do not. It's probably not the website so much as the situation.

                        •  For the record, (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          socindemsclothing

                          I met my husband on Plenty of Fish, another free dating site. Well be married two years in July, and I couldn't be happier that I took a chance on love online!

                          Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

                          by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 01:25:27 PM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

                        •  Outlier, maybe...but it proves the point that you (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          Greek Goddess

                          can always find a gem if you dig through enough muck.  I'm sure there are plenty of great people on OkCupid, etc., and it's always nice to read about another success story.  

                          I think women just have to brace themselves for the onslaught of undesirables if they're going to go that route.  And be courageous enough to have high standards.  A 40-year-old guy who wants to date women 25-42 is a shallow d-bag no matter if he's the CEO of Philanthropy Inc and rescues abandoned puppies and kittens in his spare time.  I would give anything to go back in time and beat that into the head of my younger self.  

                          Bipartisan usually means that a larger-than-usual deception is being carried out. -George Carlin

                          -7.88, -7.64

                          by socindemsclothing on Thu May 16, 2013 at 07:12:59 PM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

                  •  Tee hee! n/t (3+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    socindemsclothing, karmsy, zooecium

                    Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

                    by Greek Goddess on Wed May 15, 2013 at 07:40:50 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

          •  If you're not part of the solution...... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Greek Goddess

            Joy shared is doubled. Pain shared is halved. Spider Robinson

            by nolagrl on Wed May 15, 2013 at 07:03:25 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  There Is No Such Thing as "The" Culture. (11+ / 0-)

        There are thousands of cultures around the world that are represented here full blown or diluted below the surface. Gender relations and expectations here run the whole gamut of the rest of the planet from the most oppressive to the most liberated.

        There was a huge sea-change in the mid 60's with the Pill, and while older generations and religious reactionaries stayed behind with the disrespect for sexual activity, a big chunk of the population moved forward at that point.

        I've been a wedding and funeral musician since the early 70's constantly dealing with most of the range of European and quite a few non European families. If you weren't an evangelical I'd have to ask if you stepped out of a time machine because I haven't encountered women or men in the mainstream with such harsh views of women's respectability since "Gilligan's Island" was on the air.

        But there are definitely ethnicities and religious affiliations where that's remained true.

        We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

        by Gooserock on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:52:57 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I don't know if it's always or even mainly (10+ / 0-)

      contempt -- but I do know that if you sleep too soon with a man, he is less likely to bond with you and more likely to see it as a one-time escapade.

      When I was in my early 20's and not interested in settling down to one guy, I had my share of one night stands.  They were fine, I enjoyed them in the moment, and forgot about them soon after.  I didn't lose respect for the guys I slept with - but my intention was never anything beyond the moment.  

      The relationships that have been long-lasting were the ones where I took my time in getting to know and trust the man, and vice versa.  So that when we finally did the deed, it had some meaning and it served as a further bonding in the relationship.

      There's nothing wrong with casual sex, as long as you're as careful about it as can be.  But expecting it to lead to a long term relationship will usually result in disappointment.  If I had a daughter, that is most definitely one of life's lessons I'd try to be teaching her.  It's a concept I have discussed with my son on more than one occasion, much to his embarrassment.  

    •  This old woman agrees w GG (5+ / 0-)

      And yeah, I was a second-wave feminist, even putting lots of hours over many years on radical feminist theology which has been oh so extremely helpful to me in later life (snark).  But the skills in deconstruction have been useful.

      I don't think GG is 'promoting' a 'notion'.  Not do I think she's saying anything about 'a woman respectability'.

      I think what she's talking about is the most basic levels of one-to-one relationships -- or of attempted relationships.  And she's right.

      •  Regarding this: (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        socindemsclothing
        I don't think GG is 'promoting' a 'notion'.  Not do I think she's saying anything about 'a woman respectability'.
        I politely differ.

        It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

        by karmsy on Wed May 15, 2013 at 05:04:33 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I didn't either (11+ / 0-)

          until I reached my 50s.  And I didn't want to accept it as the thought began to develop.  I was very resistant letting go of the ideological 'how it ought to be' that I had based decisions on in my 20s-30s and, say to say, even into my early forties.

          One thing that begins to happens after age, say, age 45 (plus or minus) is that you begin to do what they call 'life review'.  You find yourself looking back over your life and evaluating how you did, if your choices made sense, where you were right and where you were wrong, if you had to make that decision today, instead of 30 years ago, would your decision be the same?  Were your criteria valid?  Had you learned enough by then to be capable of making a good, sound, informed decision?

          And, of course, as you look back, you find many instances to which your older self  can only say things like: ' What was I thinking?'  or 'Geez, thought I knew so much and I didn't even have a clue!'.  And you come to forgive yourself and can only say 'Well, how could I have known any better.  I was just a pup!'

          I remember thinking that way about my 19-23 year-old self when I was around 35.  Now I look back at that 35-year-old self realized how much I still hadn't learned since then.

          In regard to the particular issue in question, I have not only my own choices/experiences to look back on, but on my memories of many other women -- friends, co-workers and such -- and how we all just talked our experiences to death.  So the body of evidence I'm basing my statement on was provided by quite a tribe of women, over the years.

          And so eventually there came a day, after the thoughts about the ideology/experience conflict had been showing up in my brains & emotions pretty frequently for several months, one day I just stopped and said:  'Stop.  Look at these two ideas.  Only one can be true.  Which is it?"

          I looked at them both for a moment.  I could only accept one of those ideas while remaining true to the body of five decades of experience.  For me, experience will win that kind of conflict every time.  So, with a sigh, I said, 'Well, that's that.'  And let the ideology go in favor of lived reality.

          Then I finished sweeping up and watched a movie that afternoon.

          •  I seem to understand both sides, but tend to (5+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Greek Goddess, Chi, JerryNA, CroneWit, karmsy

            think that the lack of respect, such as it exists, would be from the kind of guys (misogynists) that I would not want to date anyway, were I not happily paired now. I tend to agree with karmsy on this, and think women should make their own standards and let the guys adjust.

            My ex-husband and I had just seen each other around a couple of times when we ran into each other in a bar, sat and had a chat and went straight home. It was atypical, as I was pretty shy, but there was no lack of respect because he was really crazy about me.

            So, it is more complicated than that. I would say "don't sleep with people who aren't crazy about you unless you just want it to be a one night stand and that's fine with you."  

            Lots of people, males and females, like to know someone well first.  And lots like to date more and see more people and get involved. And lots have no idea what they want. That last group can be dicey.

            Happy birthday Greek Goddess! I'm just a few years behind you, close enough to feel my advice giving days coming on!

            •  Thanks, LT--I look forward to your mountaintop (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Lonely Texan, CroneWit

              wisdom when it's your turn! Though you seem to have a pretty good handle on things right now. ;0)

              Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

              by Greek Goddess on Wed May 15, 2013 at 07:44:48 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  Thanks, LT. (0+ / 0-)

              Though I didn't say so clearly at the time, the crux of my objection to the diarist's remark was that her "wisdom" completely discounted women's wants, which are discounted in society, anyway.

              I love this remark:

              I tend to agree with karmsy on this, and think women should make their own standards and let the guys adjust.

              It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

              by karmsy on Thu May 16, 2013 at 09:55:15 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  OK, I've had a bit of time to reflect (3+ / 0-)

            on remarks I made yesterday.

            I've realized it's actually more personal than I let on.

            I have spent now almost 5 decades being bombarded with misogynist CULTURAL propaganda of "how things ought to be," i.e., women should be young, slim, pretty, light-skinned, do as they're told, and never ask questions. THEN men will want them.

            Hey, wait a minute. What about what WOMEN want? Is that important, at all?

            I have wasted more time being completely out-of-touch my wants, because "what I wanted" didn't matter--per my early experience in my family, the church I attended, and whatever. All that mattered was "what I was good for," and this was reckoned in authoritarian and patriarchal terms.

            It's hurt me. The time I spent completely discounting my personal wants, in decisions about schooling, employment, and intimate relationships, is time I'll never make up. I'll always be behind. So, when the diarist started propounding her wisdom about "what men wanted," as if this should factor so highly in women's lives, I guess I got sore.

            It's drivel we have to listen to all the damn time, anyway.

            It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

            by karmsy on Thu May 16, 2013 at 09:50:52 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Karmsy, you got guts. (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              karmsy, radical simplicity

              Thanks so much for all your comments and reflections. I never meant to propound the notion that what men want should set the agenda for how women behave. Rather, I was trying to offer my observation that in American culture, regardless of era, women have their work cut out for them if they are trying to achieve certain relationship goals. If anything, I intended to highlight--bemoan, even--the fact that women continue to struggle against the same obstacles that the feminist movement has worked so hard to overcome.

              I, too, spent years of my life shoving my wants and needs aside to live up to the image that others--parents, husbands (and there have been several), society--had of me. I, too, regret opportunities lost, decisions made and not made, time lost trying to please others. I think many women feel this way. When I embraced the person I am, I felt free, and I also found myself attracting the kind of people (men and women) who appreciate me for who I am.

              Your statement that you will always be behind makes me wish for you the chance to embrace your own "timeline" of life in which you are not behind, but right on schedule--that every day will bring a new opportunity to kick the drivel to the curb and set your own agenda.

              {{{karmsy}}}

              Hugs to you!

              Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

              by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 01:58:51 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  Agreed. (7+ / 0-)

        Sleeping with someone too soon doesn't prove either party likes or respects the other one. Waiting to sleep together is much more telling.

        And the diarist didn't say anything about sex with men you have no respect for...soooo!!!!

        IIRC, young men willingly trade in respect for sex, never questioning a "gift horse," should the possibility of sex on the first date come up. For young women, this is STILL a question, according to my daughters. My advice has always been "If you think you might want the guy for something other than sex, then waiting a bit is never a mistake." Different phrasing but same lesson as the diarist conveys.

        •  Wow. You said that so well. (4+ / 0-)

          I wanted to write about that, but couldn't come up with a way of saying it that wasn't crass.

          'never questioning a "gift horse' -- great phrase!

          [insert big-eyed lolkittie pic here]
          'Tuna?  You have TUUUUUNA?  Of course I'll still respect you in the morning!'

        •  You disregard the assumption that (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Greek Goddess, JerryNA

          women initiate sex without guilt.

          I'm sure the youngsters think we're old-fashioned even thinking about it.  They know how to Google 'sex.'

          I was a foot soldier in the sexual revolution. I was young, and strong and was determined to not look back and regret not doing.  :)   I don't.  Vague feelings of guilt my 40s, but now it's memories of a youth well spent. (pun.)

          We can always blame it on raging hormones.  We are designed to crave sex right after puberty, just like any other creature.

          Besides, if sex was normalized and accepted, how would advertisers sell everything using it?  Sex might still create desire, but so do Taco Bell commercials.

          Joy shared is doubled. Pain shared is halved. Spider Robinson

          by nolagrl on Wed May 15, 2013 at 07:22:19 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Thanks, CroneWit. I'm merely reporting my (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        zooecium

        observations, like if I'd said African Americans continue to fight workplace prejudice on a daily basis. It's not right, but it is true.  

        Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

        by Greek Goddess on Wed May 15, 2013 at 07:47:48 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  It's not about "respect" from the guy AFAIK (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      zooecium, Greek Goddess

      It's about making sure we're both on the same page about a whole lot of other things, sexuality being only one aspect.

      "War is not the answer, for only love can conquer hate." ~ Al Cleveland & Marvin Gaye (1970)

      by JBL55 on Thu May 16, 2013 at 11:18:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Happy Birthday (8+ / 0-)

    You left out one important one:

    "It's what you learn after you know everything that's important."

    I contest #3, only because there are men who want sex and the serious relationship.  Unfortunately, they are rare.

    Enjoy the next fifty. :)

    "People should not be afraid of their government; governments should be afraid of their people." --V

    by MikeTheLiberal on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:02:35 AM PDT

  •  I can vouch for #4 from personal experience. (9+ / 0-)

    None of the walking appetites off Hollywood Boulevard who regularly cleaned out my refrigerator ever gave me any real trouble.  Some of them apparently belonged to one of the most dangerous gangs in Los Angeles.

    The only ones I got grief from were living at home with at least one parent.

    For that matter, I can vouch for #5 as well.

    Strength and dignity are her clothing, she rejoices at the days to come; She opens her mouth with wisdom, and the law of kindness is on her tongue.

    by loggersbrat on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:03:25 AM PDT

  •  I can agree with your observations from the (14+ / 0-)

    vantage point of 60 years but would add an addendum to your 25th point, sometimes just opening your eyes the next morning is a triumph

  •  Welcome to the club. And happy birthday!! nt (4+ / 0-)

    God be with you, Occupiers. God IS with you.

    by Hohenzollern on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:07:43 AM PDT

    •  Thanks! Got my AARP card and everything! n/t (5+ / 0-)

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:13:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  OMG! You're on a permanent.... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Hohenzollern, Chi, Greek Goddess

        ... junk mail list if AARP has your snail mail address.  They will sell your name and address, and you will never be off of any snail mail spam lists for ever and ever and ever.  Or email spam lists if you gave them your email addy.

        For an old woman, I have quite a good set of arm muscles from carrying dead-tree junk mail in, putting it in the junk mail bag, and carrying it out to the recyclable bin.  Ugh.

        The original purpose for AARP was good..., but the organization has gone horribly awry by becoming a corporate insurance monopoly for Medicare supplemental insurance (being a corporation seeking profits now is why they supported that piece of shite corporate giveaway medical insurance bill).

        When I turned 50 [mumble years ago] I was getting their magazine for a year or so.  It was too full of ads (a condition that can only have worsened through the years).  I never renewed the subscription or the membership in AARP.  I loathe ads more than I have the ability to express, and I never, ever forgive those organizations that sell my name and address.  [I put my name different ways on things.  I know who sells my name and address by the formatting used....]

        I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

        by NonnyO on Wed May 15, 2013 at 02:16:58 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  try opting out of the DMMA (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Greek Goddess

          Direct Mail Marketing Association, i.e. the pro junk mailers.
          I did- it cut my junk mail by more than half.  Then I wrote to the big 3 credit reporting agencies TransUnion, Experian, and Equifax (there's also Innovis and some others) telling them not to sell my name. That cut out the "pre-approved" credit card offers without having to write them one by one. Now I just get the local "any customer" junk mail you can't opt out of, and my regular mail. Some days I get no mail at all (sheer bliss). It's a lot easier to find the mail that's important to me when there is so little.

  •  two years per lesson (7+ / 0-)

    thats a decent rate! I am now about 49.7 years at it and cant make sense of it yet. You´re definitely out in front!

    Happy Birthday :)

    no. 13 is true, sadly.

    •  Thanks, marsanges! (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      commonmass, marsanges, NonnyO, Lefty Ladig

      I'm truly concerned for this generation of young people who are absorbed in their electronic devices. Their behaviour seems nothing less than addictive. I worry that they are making themselves vulnerable to other addictive preoccupations later in life.

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:17:28 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Happy big Greek birthday! (7+ / 0-)

    I have run towards every "crazy" person I have ever met and have never regretted doing so. When I have insomnia, I call up one of my "normal" friends at bedtime.

    Some Christians are smart and some are stupid. Many atheists are bitter and angry. But so are many Christians.

    You are SO right on swearing. My grandmother used to say that using curse words frequently was a "sign of an underdeveloped vocabulary".

    I'm very serious about the "crazy" part. My late husband's bipolarity was precisely what made him so fucking special, even though it was well under control.

    I resent that. I demand snark, and overly so -- Markos Moulitsas.

    by commonmass on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:22:31 AM PDT

    •  {{{commonmass}}} (5+ / 0-)

      A big hug to you for valuing the "specials." They indeed make life more interesting. However, not everyone is as well equipped or motivated as you to make life with them work. Your husband must have been one fabulous person, and he was lucky to have you. My condolences on his loss.

      You're right: a lot of atheists are bitter and angry. But I lean toward the notion that a true atheist is neither. What is there to be angry about? Yet I have met many angry people who claim they are atheists who I would say are actually angry believers. Once you make peace with your beliefs, whatever they are, how can there be anger?

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:35:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well, I think a lot of that anger is misdirected (8+ / 0-)

        A lot of it belongs directed towards specific individuals who abused religion and in so doing so, abused the person who is now angry and resentful.

        I am lucky that my involvement in organized religion was my choice (and in my case, it's a career choice as well--I'm "pious for pay" I like to joke but it's ONLY a joke) and that I was never oppressed by it as a kid or young adult. But people DO get oppressed by it and when you've been harmed by religion, it's easy to call every single theist a perpetrator. I get it.

        So I think you're very right, GG. Once you make peace, well, you should have peace. Some people aren't satisfied with peace, though. You're lucky. So am I.

        I resent that. I demand snark, and overly so -- Markos Moulitsas.

        by commonmass on Wed May 15, 2013 at 11:45:04 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I think - wonder - if ... (7+ / 0-)

        ... the "angry atheists" are actually more disappointed than angry.

        I was angry @ age 14/15 when the minister lied to me about dancing in confirmation class.  What drove me was an "I'll show him!" attitude since the movie The Ten Commandments had come out not long before and I'd heard/read it was based on the Bible and there was dancing in the movie..., so....  I then read the Bible a chapter a night until I got to "then Miriam, sister of Aaron, with her ladies took up their timbrels and danced..." right after they crossed the Red Sea.  I showed that to the minister at the next class and if looks could kill I wouldn't be writing this.  I showed him for a liar in front of the whole class.

        I finished reading the whole Bible..., and read it cover-to-cover a second time in my early 20s (altho, given my life-long genealogy hobby that I've had longer than you've been alive, it may be surprising that I skipped most of Numbers the second time; the begats wore me down).  Then I went on to read a whole bunch of other books over a series of many years, lots of history, added anthropology, archaeology as side interests.  Then I got to When God Was A Woman by Merlin Stone, read the works she cited in her bibliography, went on to do more reading like that (checking bib sources and reading their books, etc.).

        So, my atheism was a process that took over two decades.  I didn't become an atheist on a whim.  I really wanted to believe, tried to believe.

        But I'm still disappointed that I can't believe in all the good parts of the cotton-candy fantasies of a heavenly afterlife and such.  I get why unquestioning belief is attractive and so easy, but I'm not a child and don't believe in the fairy tales either.  I also don't understand why the modern religicos who beat us over the head with their brand of bigoted beliefs think they can claim their prejudices as the only 'true religious belief.'  It makes no sense and doesn't fit into my wish for a pretty fairy tale cotton-candy religion that's good for/to/with everyone and no innocents are ever harmed by evil people in the process of adopting a religious belief.  [In my wishful thinking religion, no one died in a cruel manner on a cross for the sake of religious belief because no one should suffer for any reason in my dreamy version of religion.  No one would be tortured, burned at the stake, etc., in the name of religion.]

        I've said before that "I'm a wishful atheist."  I suppose that's true.  Sad endings and certain realities make me disappointed which leads me to be angry, especially when I know even some realities could have happy endings "if only...."  I want happy endings for everyone.  I love, love, love stories with happy endings.  Chalk it up to my being a dreamy Pisces who loves fairy tales and happy endings....

        I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

        by NonnyO on Wed May 15, 2013 at 02:53:27 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I'm an atheist, & I couldn't disagree more with #2 (4+ / 0-)
          Belief in gods is a testament to the spectacular limitations of the human imagination.
          That ancient humans had the capacity to conjur up things that did no exist in order to explain things that did...is exactly a testament to the spectacular lack of limitations of human imagination.

          Now if the diarist meant "current" as in

          Current-

          Belief in gods is a testament to the spectacular limitations of the human imagination.
          That I would agree with. However, the original formulations (long before the Greeks) were testaments to human intellectual capabilities...representing a much greater intellectual leap than from that to atheism.

          Comparing different religions & concluding none make sense, is a much easier intellectual task than the one undertaken by our unknown ancestors who first posited the existence of the supernatural.

          The Americas greatest political dynasty...the Kaan

          by catilinus on Wed May 15, 2013 at 04:53:49 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Interesting point, cat. (0+ / 0-)
            That ancient humans had the capacity to conjur up things that did no exist in order to explain things that did...is exactly a testament to the spectacular lack of limitations of human imagination.
            No reason science wouldn't fit into this concept--much of what explains the natural world is unseen, after all. One could argue that early humans used the tools they had at the time to formulate their explanations, much as later humans used later tools (microscope, telescope) to formulate theirs.

            Of course, no discussion of the spiritual experience of early humans is complete without a debate about the concept of the bicameral mind, but suffice it to say that your argument is provocative, and I'd love to continue it in an atheist-oriented diary.

            Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

            by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 02:14:12 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  The Bible, I firmly believe, is a dangerous (4+ / 0-)

          document. It should never be "read", only studied.

          I resent that. I demand snark, and overly so -- Markos Moulitsas.

          by commonmass on Wed May 15, 2013 at 07:17:34 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Good points, NonnyO. (0+ / 0-)

          I remember feeling sad when I realised I was an atheist because the myths are so beautiful: someone loved you enough before you were born to die for you; someone is constantly watching out for your safety and wellbeing; all you have to do is ask and whatever you want will be provided for you. It's not easy grasping that the universe is amoral, that suffering and violence and death can be random and merciless, that when life ends we cease to exist. But once I understood these things, the peace I felt truly passed understanding, ironically.

          Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

          by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 02:39:18 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  O Athena, you are wise (8+ / 0-)

    However, I am older than you, and must comment on a couple of points:

    3. Women hoping to have a meaningful relationship with a man must hold off having sex until they get to know their partner. It doesn't matter how liberated or modern women are--men don't respect women who sleep with them too soon. Unfortunately, no amount of legislation or protesting will change this.
    Actually, there are a lot of men to whom this does not apply.  Regardless of when it happens, as soon as a woman lets them sleep with her, they are slain. However, they are not the kind of men that women are in a hurry to go to bed with.
    10. Animals are inherently innocent and beautiful. It's the influence of people that makes them evil and ugly.
    And that even includes insects:

    “Do you hear the grasshopper?”

    Crunch!

    “Yes.”

    11. Extraterrestrials mean us no harm. If they did, they would have wiped us out by now.
    And they will rue the day they didn’t.
    20. Make love as though it's the last time you will ever see your partner. It may well be.
    I guess I might as well make this one a quickie.
  •  I enjoyed this diary! (6+ / 0-)

    You are an object from which to extract profit.

    by Syoho on Wed May 15, 2013 at 12:17:20 PM PDT

  •  Ha, your (2) is marvelous (5+ / 0-)

    I enjoy straight talk that borders on poetry, creating sublime sarcasm.

    "So, please stay where you are. Don't move and don't panic. Don't take off your shoes! Jobs is on the way."

    by wader on Wed May 15, 2013 at 12:40:45 PM PDT

  •  Happy Birthday!! Fun diary. But... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess, NonnyO

    I do have to disagree with number 18. There is a actually a huge, deep gulf between most antiques and junk. I grew up with 18th-century French antiques in our apartment. They are works of art. The craftsmanship, the finely-detailed marquetry work, the detailed bronzes: the sheer beauty of these pieces is breathtaking. And the history!! My father knew the provenance of each piece.

    I will certainly concede that SOME antiques can look like junk. I have a table--a very, very old drop-leaf table with screw-on legs--that I bought for $7 at a MaxFund thrift store. A friend swears it is Federal. I used to know Leslie and Leigh Keno, when I lived in NY, but now they're famous and I'm too embarrassed to email them for a $7 table. The table does look like junk, but the wood is good, if blackened in spots, and the screws are clearly not machine-made.

    It was my dinner table when I was single and broke. It's in the basement now. Someday, maybe I'll find somebody to look at it. I didn't refinish it because that would destroy any value that it might have.

    "...Males are biologically driven to go out and hunt giraffes.” —Newt Gingrich in 1995

    by BadKitties on Wed May 15, 2013 at 12:46:03 PM PDT

    •  Respectfully disagree. n/t It's your birthday! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Greek Goddess, NonnyO

      "...Males are biologically driven to go out and hunt giraffes.” —Newt Gingrich in 1995

      by BadKitties on Wed May 15, 2013 at 12:52:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  LOL! That's wonderful, and so true: (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BadKitties, NonnyO, Lefty Ladig, blueoasis

        Antiques that are rare and beautiful are unmistakable and priceless. I should have stipulated that my observation was formed by years of cruising "antique" stores in the West Village in NYC, as well as "antique malls" throughout the south and midwest, which are little more than flea markets. My attraction to them is that rare "real" antique that someone has put out for sale without appreciating its true value. When I see such treasures, I snatch them up. But to hear these vendors talk,  every old chair and table is an antique. Your experience growing up is the real deal--nothing comes close to the real things!

        Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

        by Greek Goddess on Wed May 15, 2013 at 01:17:35 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes!! That is the BEST part!! I have some (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          NonnyO, Greek Goddess

          sterling coasters--real, solid sterling, not plate--that I bought for $2 each at a Goodwill =) I love treasure hunting.

          Also, just BTW, I celebrated my 45th birthday by getting my navel pierced. It still makes me giggle. And my mother had a fit and demanded that my father DO something. Teehee =) I did have to promise that I would never get a tattoo =)

          "...Males are biologically driven to go out and hunt giraffes.” —Newt Gingrich in 1995

          by BadKitties on Wed May 15, 2013 at 03:19:04 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Additions: (8+ / 0-)

    Never put off for tomorrow what you can put off for the day after.

    Achieve inner peace through lowered expectations.

    "I'm not writing to make conservatives happy. I want them to hate my opinions. I'm not interested in debating them. I want to stop them." - Steve Gilliard

    by grog on Wed May 15, 2013 at 01:00:33 PM PDT

  •  I'll be joining that club this summer. (8+ / 0-)

    I find my attitudes are changing as I get older.  While I still don't think of myself as nearly 50, I find it hard to think I'm even in my 40's.  Late 30's seems about right.  Time does seem to go by quicker these days, though I read somewhere that it's likely a result of having fewer new experiences, so the brain doesn't grow as many new nerve memory pathways.  Anyway, my thoughts on how I am and how I will be remembered are changing as I grow closer to retirement and that will be the next major change (hopefully when I decide to, and not for some cutback at my company) in my life.  No kids to mark time by, but I do have woozles and a pootie, along with my wife (who was a grandmother when I married her, but she's estranged from her kids so I've never met them).  I feel fortunate I have a nice place to spend the rest of my life in - my "forever" home.  Hopefully I don't wind up having to leave it for some managed care location some day.  I can see myself on my back deck at some point, just sitting out there until someone walking by notices the old man has a sparrow's nest in his hair and has lost an awful lot of weight.  Then they can come, find my will, and dispose of me and my possessions as specified.

    •  That's quite a picture, ColoTim! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ColoTim

      I join you in hoping your retirement is a result of your own will and not external factors. This economy has kicked my ass so hard, I can't see myself ever being able to retire. Your life seems comfortably stable, something I've always wanted but never quite managed to achieve. Although since marrying my husband, I've had the most stability I've ever had.

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 02:21:20 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Happy birthday, Greek Goddess! (3+ / 0-)

    Like your name--are you Athena, the Wise One, or Aphrodite?

    This is really interesting:

    Once addictive desire is ignited in the brain, whether in response to alcohol, gambling, shopping, relationships, or anything else, a lifelong battle has begun.
    I've battled addictions to tobacco, alcohol, and relationships. I seem to be OK now, although when it comes to chocolate...

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Wed May 15, 2013 at 01:48:28 PM PDT

    •  {{{Diana}}} (0+ / 0-)

      I see you are also a goddess! ;0)

      I relate to different goddesses at different times of my life. I never dreamed I'd have the nerve to imagine myself as Aphrodite, but the older I get, the more possible it seems. Maybe because the eyesight's going, and I've reached the point in life where I really don't give a damn what people think of me.

      Glad all your battling now is the chocolate demon. You're in good company!

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 02:24:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Animals are inherently innocent and beautiful (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    salmo, Greek Goddess

    exception as to first part: cats.

    "To recognize error, to cut losses, to alter course, is the most repugnant option in government." Historian Barbara Tuchman

    by Publius2008 on Wed May 15, 2013 at 01:48:43 PM PDT

  •  For me, "Go travel" is the #1 advice I give out. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    aitchdee, zooecium, Greek Goddess

    It makes such an unbelievable difference in how one understands the world and how one comes to see life at home.

    I say travel as much as possible while you are young and willing to sleep in cheap hostels or in a blanket on the ground.

    And your item #15 is so true. That took me a long time to accept gracefully.

    "She was very young,he thought,...she did not understand that to push an inconvenient person over a cliff solves nothing." -1984

    by aggressiveprogressive on Wed May 15, 2013 at 01:52:22 PM PDT

  •  There is nothing sexier than a man who can.... (9+ / 0-)

    ...dance well and I just spent the last three years learning how to dance Argentine tango. Women who would never have given me a second look are suddenly all over me (both literally and figuratively). I travel for work, and I can go to a dance in any decent-sized city and have a great time. What fun!

  •  Happy B-day! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    Your list is about 95% correct, not a bad score when you're 50. :)

  •  Happy Birthday GG (6+ / 0-)

    LOVE these! here's another one:

    Physical activity is the antidote to many things that make people feel bad.  And it's never too late - people can be in better physical shape in their 40's than in their 30's, and in their 50's than in their 40's.  (Don't know yet about the 60's, but intend to find out.)

    "Patriotism is supporting your country all the time and your government when it deserves it." - Mark Twain

    by Patience is Not a Virtue on Wed May 15, 2013 at 02:48:57 PM PDT

    •  You got THAT right, Patience! (0+ / 0-)

      I'm a professional dancer, and I truly feel in pretty decent shape even at my advanced age. We'll compare notes when we hit our 60's--I'm guessing your theory will still hold up!

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 02:45:30 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thank you for the timeless and ageless (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    NonnyO, Greek Goddess

    aphorisms. See, I know a little Greek, too!

    "The press just doesn’t know how to handle flat-out untruths," ~Paul Krugman

    by Nimbus on Wed May 15, 2013 at 02:56:26 PM PDT

  •  So many golden nuggets in here. Thank you. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    NonnyO, Greek Goddess

    And happy birthday.

  •  Some responses to your thoughts: (4+ / 0-)

    7.  America is young in years, but a lot can happen in a short time.  A handful of generations of Athenians created Western civilization in all its facets, while thousands of years of other civilizations went nowhere and did nothing but make some nice pottery.  The most important thing about America is that we are where every other society intersects, collides, fuses, and shatters.  Most of the results are predictable - a few are not; and that few make all the difference.

    8.  Animals are not inherently "innocent" or "beautiful."  They, like us, are products of hard evolution.  They are kind where their nature allows, and hideously cruel where there is advantage in it, much like people.  They eat the children of other animals, mewling out for their mothers, and feel no compassion - and neither do most human beings in animal slaughtering.  In truth, Innocence is an invention of human perception, and thus something of a fallacy to pretend we are somehow corrupted by our knowledge of it.  We are the only known species capable of formulating rules to encapsulate an otherwise fleeting emotion of compassion, however rarely we do so properly.

    11.  Extraterrestrials (if, when, and where they exist) don't know we exist, are too far away to care, or too advanced to in any way be affected by us.  That doesn't mean they're better than us.  We do not want to meet them - it would be the African tribesmen meeting the Englishmen, but way worse.

    14.  A conspiracy is like sex: Increasingly impractical if it involves more than 5 people.

    17.  Well, shit.  I can't, and won't, dance at all.

    21.  The purpose of education is not to teach you anything - it's to surround you with the forms of learning until you figure out that you don't really need to be taught, because every moment in time is rich with revelation.

    Today's trivia becomes tomorrow's sacrament.

    by Troubadour on Wed May 15, 2013 at 03:10:54 PM PDT

    •  Troub, you've got some great points. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Troubadour

      The U.S. certainly has achieved some wondrous things in a short time. But our nation hasn't the benefit of centuries of history upon which to draw as other nations do (Egypt, Great Britain, and Greece, I daresay, to name a fraction). I'm not saying these nations don't make mistakes today just because they're older, but they do have longer resumes to support their choices.

      My definitions of "innocent" and "beautiful" have a lot to do with nature playing itself out without impediments from human influence. A predator eating its prey is no less innocent or beautiful because it is doing what the predator is supposed to do. A monkey dressed in a bellhop's uniform jumping around to make people laugh--that, to me, is neither innocent nor beautiful, but tragic.

      Your definition of conspiracy is priceless!

      As a dance teacher, I wish I could get hold of you. I've turned the most reluctant men into delightful dance partners with very little effort on their part. Mostly it's about breathing.

      Your point about education: Bravo! If only every student could embrace the revelations of life as you can!

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 04:54:45 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  In regards to #6 (5+ / 0-)

    I am widely considered to be sexy, charming, vivacious, creative, funny, and attractive.  Ok, I'm also slightly crazy, but why would you want to avoid me at all costs?

    P.S. I used to be even more sexy, charming, vivacious, creative, funny, and attractive many years ago when  was your age.  At least my wife thinks so.

    If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy. ~James Madison

    by mjshep on Wed May 15, 2013 at 03:13:55 PM PDT

    •  LOL, mjshep--you got me there! (0+ / 0-)

      "Slightly crazy" can apply to most all of us, and we certainly don't want to deprive ourselves of the opportunity to meet each other. "Certifiably insane," as in dangerous, harmful and toxic, is more what I had in mind when I said "crazy." No offense to those whose insanity is under control via meds or therapy. I refer to those untreated souls who are on the loose, wreaking havoc and destruction among the unwary, leaving a trail of broken hearts behind them--and looking fabulous as they do so.

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 02:53:27 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Happy Birthday! (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    NonnyO, ladybug53, Greek Goddess

    Great list, especially #22.

    I'm a babe of 45, but I will add: Being reliable and showing up on time will get you farther in life than an overpriced degree from a fancy college. Do the math on tuition and loan repayment before you declare a major. Student loans follow you forever.

     I can think of no more stirring symbol of man's humanity to man than a fire engine.     -- Kurt Vonnegut

    by SteelerGrrl on Wed May 15, 2013 at 03:22:10 PM PDT

  •  :-) You are still SO young.... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    penguins4peace, Greek Goddess

    ... but you have gained much wisdom.

    Addendum to #3:  If I had known then what I know now, I'd have made my doctor cut that stupid, useless little flap of skin as soon as adolescence started to spite those who make much ado about nothing (now, that's ultimate control over one's own body!).  Virginity is highly overrated..., and WHY must a woman 'get to know' a guy before going to bed with him?  First impressions are probably correct..., and some men one does not want to know because the 'strong silent types' don't necessarily mean 'still waters run deep.'  It usually means they're too stupid to open their mouths but smart enough not to betray their lack of intelligence by speaking.

    "Getting to know a man" means becoming bored senseless because when a woman figures out he's as dumb as the fantasy bimbo who lives in his head that he wants to bed, he ceases to be worth "getting to know."

    WHY is the burden of proof of virginity up to a woman?  Historically it's on a woman so the first-born (presumably a son) can thus be the inheritor of the family's land.  Only a woman's monogamy matters when it comes to insuring paternity; a man can still go sew his wild oats all over the place as long as he has a wet and wild woman with whom to engage in wild adventuresome sex.  History matters in these things.

    We should be taught critical thinking skills from early grade school forward.  Most of the public education system consists in drumming that part of our personalities and thinking abilities out of us before we hit high school age.

    12. The U.S. public education system is and always has been broken for a reason. An uneducated population is a compliant population--easier to manipulate and control. This is why early training in critical thinking is so lacking, and so necessary.

    21. The purpose of a college education is not to teach you how to do something--it's to teach you how to think.

    Damn!  Right on!!!!!
    15. We are taught as we grow up that the only way we will succeed is by doing our best. Then, as adults, we are surrounded by mediocrity that is rewarded handsomely.
    May your birthday be as spectacular as fireworks and FAR from mediocre!!!!!

    I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

    by NonnyO on Wed May 15, 2013 at 03:45:25 PM PDT

    •  NonnyO, many thanks! (0+ / 0-)

      I agree with you wholeheartedly: Virginity is vastly overrated. So is sex, for that matter. Frankly, I had the best sex of my life when I was a virgin.

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 02:56:22 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Rec..! Sorry I missed your comment... (0+ / 0-)

        ... before when I could still Rec it by clicking the dot.  (Finally scrolling down through comments this morning.)

        I was too scared of sex when I was a virgin ("Good girls didn't do it!"  I was a good girl.), so I had zero curiosity about it.  It took lots of reading over years, etc., to get me past the prudishness I once had.  Lots of time wasted.

        IF - IF (a giant neon sign IF) - one has a good sex partner who knows where everything is on the female body and isn't afraid to find out what can give a woman a pleasurable reaction of some kind, and if he isn't afflicted with premature ejaculation or limp dick, and all those assorted things, then sex can be as much fun as what's in novels and as spectacular as the crashing music at the end of the 1812 Overture, complete with fireworks.  With some it's possible to have the fireworks and the sweet glowing embers of companionship sex that's just fun and comfortable and very satisfying, and all kinds of fun sex in between those different kinds of sex.

        Lots of IFs, but when accomplished, it's pretty sweet.  It really does take emotionally and mentally mature people who have good sex, whether that's a one-night stand or a relationship that lasts several years.

        The other kind of manipulative sex with a man who is essentially an emotional child who has mommy (&/or daddy) issues and uses sex as a psychological weapon to be given or withheld at his whim is just too petty to tolerate.  End the relationship and sublimate the sex drive into doing something useful.  [Gack!  Psychologically immature men who are, for the most part also sexually immature and have sexual and/or emotional hangups that end up being psychological dominance-submissive games, are useless and need to go find their own planet.]

        I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

        by NonnyO on Sat May 18, 2013 at 04:24:52 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Happy Birthday (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    I hope you have a great time!  I agree mostly with 21a.  I am always having to tell that to my children.  Yes, you might not need this in your upcoming career or job, but that is not what it is about.  It is about training your mind.  Learning calculus is like lifting weights.  You train the body, you need to train the mind.

    I am a christian and I mean no offense, but felt a need to respond.  This is what I have learned in my 54 years:

    "If I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but do not have love, I have become a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal.

    If I have the gift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and all knowledge; and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing.

    And if I give all my possessions to feed the poor, and if I surrender my body to be burned, but do not have love, it profits me nothing.

    Love is patient, love is kind and is not jealous; love does not brag and is not arrogant, does not act unbecomingly; it does not seek its own, is not provoked, does not take into account a wrong suffered, does not rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth; bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

    Love never fails; but if there are gifts of prophecy, they will be done away; if there are tongues, they will cease; if there is knowledge, it will be done away.

    For we know in part and we prophesy in part; but when the perfect comes, the partial will be done away.

    When I was a child, I used to speak like a child, think like a child, reason like a child; when I became a man, I did away with childish things.

    For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face; now I know in part, but then I will know fully just as I also have been fully known. But now, faith, hope, love, abide these three; but the greatest of these is love."

    •  This is beautiful, Scylth. (0+ / 0-)

      One of my favorite passages of the Bible. When my husband and I were married, I presented his daughters with silver charm bracelets with the last verse engraved over a series of charms.

      I've read the Bible cover to cover several times, studied it for years, served as a Sunday school teacher and church camp counselor, and accepted Jesus Christ as my lord and saviour. And I deeply appreciate the Bible, and all sacred texts, as literature, history, and anthropology. Lots of good advice and plain common sense can be found there.

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 03:34:49 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes it is beautiful (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Greek Goddess

        But, when I went to read this thread tonight, I can’t understand how I could have possibly dared to post “this is what I have learned.”  I haven’t learned that.  I want to.  Anyway, happy birthday GG, I can see that you are a very kind person.

  •  Happy Birthday! (6+ / 0-)

    You've laid out some good advice here. I'm not sure I agree with all of it--but since I'm 52-1/2 now, I'm losing my will to disagree.  :)

    My only advice for youngins: As you go through life, you can scimp on a lot of things. But never scimp on a mattress or your shoes. If you're not in one, you're in the other. And having a lousy mattress or lousy, uncomfortable shoes will give you a lousy outlook.

    Have a great next 50!

    The better I know people, the more I like my dog.

    by Thinking Fella on Wed May 15, 2013 at 04:00:40 PM PDT

  •  Beautiful... (5+ / 0-)

    Would add two more (for the youngun's)

    1. Enjoy your children. Put down the video recorder.
    2. Enjoy your children. There are no do-overs.

  •  You can never go wrong treating people w/ respect (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    NonnyO, Greek Goddess

    is a very good lesson, among many you listed.

    ---sadly, a man who can't dance well...

    Resist much, obey little. ~~Edward Abbey, via Walt Whitman

    by willyr on Wed May 15, 2013 at 05:16:10 PM PDT

  •  Most atheists are? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    I'm 51, and, in my experience, most atheists think they're smart. In fact, they scream that they're smart.

    The actual proposition of a positive atheism (maintaining that there is not and cannot be any divinity) is not particularly rational or empirical, and the casual atheism (not believing in any person's belief in God) is as often reflexive and emotional as it is based on anything approaching critical thinking.

    "...ere God made us He loved us; which love was never slacked, nor ever shall be." - Juliana of Norwich

    by The Geogre on Wed May 15, 2013 at 05:25:31 PM PDT

  •  At 50 ..you are the pearl in the oyster (4+ / 0-)

    At 60 , you start wondering where the pearl went and you realize then you have become the oyster.  IMO.  Something dramatic happens at 60.   Maybe you realize no one really lives to 120 so middle age talk is out of the question.  

    Happy Birthday.

    We the People have to make a difference and the Change.....Just do it ! Be part of helping us build a veteran community online. United Veterans of America

    by Vetwife on Wed May 15, 2013 at 05:52:04 PM PDT

    •  Wow, Vetwife! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Vetwife

      That's both exciting and ponderous. Strangely, I look forward to it!

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 02:57:33 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Some if not all of the exciting adventures (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Greek Goddess

        in my life started at 50.....Old enough to enjoy and appreciate.   I cannot even begin to tell you how much excitement and rollercoaster ride the 50's were.  From Nashville, to Washinton DC, to adopting, ..just a whirlwind.
        Not one dull moment.  Some heartache, but never dull.

        We the People have to make a difference and the Change.....Just do it ! Be part of helping us build a veteran community online. United Veterans of America

        by Vetwife on Thu May 16, 2013 at 05:17:58 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  You young whippersnappers think... (6+ / 0-)

    ...you're so damned wise.

    Total agreement with 2, 11, 16, 20 and both 21s.

    Nice diary.

    Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

    by Meteor Blades on Wed May 15, 2013 at 06:06:28 PM PDT

  •  happy half-century!!! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess, zooecium

    .... and here's to the second half!

    :-)

    every adult is responsible for every child

    by ridemybike on Wed May 15, 2013 at 06:24:50 PM PDT

    •  Thanks, ride! (0+ / 0-)

      I remember when I was impressed with myself for reaching a whole decade...then a quarter of a century. Now I'm up to a half-century. Next, I guess it'll be three-quarters of a century, if I'm so lucky. Geez, the whole country's only just over two centuries old.

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 04:31:29 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Happy birthday! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    Great list! Wish I knew half of them when I was 20.

    Organizing is what you do before you do something, so that when you do it, it is not all mixed up. A. A. Milne

    by hulibow on Wed May 15, 2013 at 07:43:00 PM PDT

    •  You and me both, hulibow. (0+ / 0-)

      If only I could go back and tell my 20-year-old self some of this stuff...would've saved myself a hell of a lot of trouble.

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 04:28:20 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Happy Birthday (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pundit, Greek Goddess

    I pretty much agree with your list.  In August I will be 67 but there is still plenty to learn.  It is my belief that the drive to learn new things keeps me young.  

    "It's like, duh. Just when you thought there wasn't a dime's worth of difference between the two parties, the Republicans go and prove you're wrong" Molly Ivins

    by Lefty Ladig on Wed May 15, 2013 at 08:18:33 PM PDT

  •  As within most cultures, it seems (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.

    In the Greek culture, it's considered an honor to give young people council as the older, wiser family member.
    Also, as with most personal observations, yours seems like a mixed bag, which is to be expected. I'm sure my daughter thinks the same of mine. Building their understanding of, if not agreement with, where the mix comes from is the key.
  •  In re #3. I respectfully disagree. (3+ / 0-)

    I respect women have have sex on the first date if they are so inclined, than women who hold off simply to play the head games of 'Oh, I've got to prove I'm worthy of respect'.

    To me #3 is right there with 'slut shaming'.  It's saying that a woman's worth is tied directly to her use as a sex object, and that her value increases if she is less sexually accessible and makes a man 'work for it'.

    A woman, just like a man, should have sex as soon, or as late as she feel comfortable doing so in a relationship.  If the man is willing to respect her at all, he will anyway, and if he's not, he's not going to have any more respect for her 'making him wait'.

    •  Somehow the first sentence got mangled. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      milton333, Greek Goddess

      Or I started to type one sentence, then changed to a different one within a few words.  Basically, I respect a woman less if she simply wants to play cutesy games to manipulate me, such as by using sex or 'holding out' to make me 'want her more'.  Work on a relationship, and have the sex whenever you're both comfortable doing so, whether it's first date or never.

      •  Point well taken, Doc. (0+ / 0-)

        I believe anyone can be a game-player no matter what they're doing. I certainly don't advocate playing games--that is manipulation, plain and simple. But I do believe that if people are looking for a long-term relationship, it's usually best to hold off on sex until the people have gotten to know each other better. Then they will be in a better position to evaluate the person on the basis of more than just the initial physical attraction.

        Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

        by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 04:26:44 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Happy Birthday, especially like Nos. 12 and 21 (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    Conservatives want compliant, docile employees who don't question authority. They attack public schools for the same reason they dismiss a liberal arts education, because they fear an educated populace with critical thinking skills

    If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. - President John F. Kennedy

    by laurel g 15942 on Thu May 16, 2013 at 06:00:37 AM PDT

  •  You can grow older and gain wisdom (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    It doesn't always happen but there's no other avenue leading in that direction.

    Suspend disbelief. It's gonna get confusing as hell soon enough.

    by Anthony Page aka SecondComing on Thu May 16, 2013 at 07:06:02 AM PDT

  •  As regards #3 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    red moon dog, Greek Goddess

    My wife and I had sex on our first "date."

    We met at a meeting. Then she came and saw me do a show on the street. We carpooled to the next meeting, had dinner, then she watched me do another show in a hotel on the way back home. We ended up at my apartment. We hung out until everything was closed, then she ran out of cigarettes. I offered her one of my rollups, and when that didn't do, said, "do you want to kiss?" She said, "what did you say?" I swallowed and repeated myself. She spent the night.

    We've been together 25 very good years.

    Much depends on who you are, the time of life you're in, and what you both are looking for. I don't know that we would have come together, if we hadn't come together that night.

    •  This is lovely, timj! (0+ / 0-)

      I wish everybody could say the same. You must know that you and your wife are rare birds.

      What kind of street show did you do?

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 04:22:25 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I'm disappointed. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    I thought there would be fifty lessons, but there were only twenty-five.

    ;-)

    Happy golden anniversary of your life, Greek Goddess!

    "War is not the answer, for only love can conquer hate." ~ Al Cleveland & Marvin Gaye (1970)

    by JBL55 on Thu May 16, 2013 at 11:07:37 AM PDT

    •  Thanks, JBL55! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JBL55

      I'll be the first to confess that I wish I could have had 50. But I'm still learning, so I need time to accumulate more!

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 04:20:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Happy Birthday! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    Fifty and now onward to 50 more great years!  Love the list.  :)

    We're walking temples of noise, and when you add tender hearts to this mix, it somehow lets us meet in places we couldn't get to any other way.-Anne Lamott

    by alicia on Thu May 16, 2013 at 01:50:26 PM PDT

  •  Belated Happy (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    50 th. Many more happy B'days.

    What do we want? Universal health care! When do we want it? Now!

    by cagernant on Thu May 16, 2013 at 02:00:29 PM PDT

  •  I'll be joining the club in a couple months (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    Greek Goddess, and there is so much wisdom in your 25 points as well as in many of the comments. I agree with every one of your enumerated life lessons.
    Sadly number 17 means I'm hopeless when it comes to sexiness as there is absolutely no rhythm in this body.
    I'd do well to better heed number 19 as well, one of my short-comings I'm afraid.

    •  Didn't say a man who couldn't dance wasn't sexy! (0+ / 0-)

      Oddly enough, a lot of professional dancers can't dance freestyle to save their lives. And a lot of people who can burn up the floor in a club can't learn a simple jazz square to save theirs. So it's really relative, JC. There's more to rhythm than music! ;0)

      Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead. ~K. Vonnegut

      by Greek Goddess on Thu May 16, 2013 at 04:10:22 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  To quote my father: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    Hoppy Bird Day! I'll be joining you, chronologically, on June 6th. This diary is awesome! Hotlisted!

    There are no second class citizens in America, and there are no second class marriages in America. - Eleanor Holmes Norton

    by Captain Sham on Thu May 16, 2013 at 04:08:56 PM PDT

  •  Next month I'll turn 65 and (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greek Goddess

    now I realize that everything I thought I knew when I was only 50 was wrong.

    Alpacas spit if you annoy them. So don't do that.

    by alpaca farmer on Thu May 16, 2013 at 05:20:14 PM PDT

  •  χαρούμενα γενέθλια!!!!!!!!!!! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Captain Sham, Greek Goddess

    “The comfort of the rich depends upon an abundant supply of the poor.” - Voltaire.

    by LamontCranston on Thu May 16, 2013 at 05:27:39 PM PDT

  •  Now that your birthday is over :) (0+ / 0-)

    Would you please explain this one?

    "21. For proof that the United States is not the greatest country on the planet, just visit any other country."

    I have been from Maine to Florida.  Southern California to Northern California, most of the states in between.

    I have been to (and worked in most):  Canada, Mexico, Japan, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, China, Australia, England, France, Holland, Belgium, Switzerland, Italy, Austria, Hungary, Slovenia, Germany, and Texas.

    I can’t understand how you would think any of those are greater in any significant way.  

    For #17, I think this is great:

    http://www.youtube.com/...

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site