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A lot of Republicans seem to believe that if they can gum up the works and make this law fail, they’ll somehow be sticking it to me. But they’d just be sticking it to you.
President Obama eased into his new theme—crunch time for the Affordable Care Act—via building on his themes from the past few weeks, namely shoring up the middle class:
We need to rebuild an economy that rewards hard work and responsibility; an economy built firmly on the cornerstones of middle-class life. Good jobs. A good education. A home of your own. A secure retirement. And quality, affordable health care that’s there when you need it.

Right now, we’re well on our way to fully implementing the Affordable Care Act. And in the next few months, we’ll reach a couple milestones with real meaning for millions of Americans.

He listed a few of the many provisions that are scheduled to kick in this year, but he saved quite a few words for his Republican foes, and launched a few well-placed verbal missiles that definitely scored as direct hits:
Many Members of Congress, in both parties, are working hard to inform their constituents about these benefits, protections, and affordable plans. But there’s also a group of Republicans in Congress working hard to confuse people, and making empty promises that they’ll either shut down the health care law, or, if they don’t get their way, they’ll shut down the government.

Think about that. They’re actually having a debate between hurting Americans who will no longer be denied affordable care just because they’ve been sick – and harming the economy and millions of Americans in the process. And many Republicans are more concerned with how badly this debate will hurt them politically than they are with how badly it’ll hurt the country.

How incredibly awful are these people? Oh, President Obama cannot wait to tell you:
Some even say that if you call their office with questions about the law, they’ll refuse to help. Call me old-fashioned – but that’s lousy constituent service. And it’s not what you deserve.

Your health insurance isn’t something to play politics with. Our economy isn’t something to play politics with. This isn’t a game. This is about the economic security of millions of families.

It's becoming clear that while it takes a lot to bait the president from across the aisle, obstruction of implementation of what he's obviously viewing as his signature achievement will do it. Fight on, President Obama. Please, fight on.

To read the transcript in full, check below the fold or visit the White House website.

Remarks of President Barack Obama
Weekly Address
The White House
August 17, 2013

Hi, everybody. Over the past few weeks, I’ve been visiting with Americans across the country to talk about what we need to do to secure a better bargain for the middle class.

We need to rebuild an economy that rewards hard work and responsibility; an economy built firmly on the cornerstones of middle-class life. Good jobs. A good education. A home of your own. A secure retirement. And quality, affordable health care that’s there when you need it.

Right now, we’re well on our way to fully implementing the Affordable Care Act. And in the next few months, we’ll reach a couple milestones with real meaning for millions of Americans.

If you’re one of the 85% of Americans who already have insurance, you’ve already got new benefits and protections under this law that you didn’t before. Free checkups, mammograms, and contraceptive care. Discounted prescription medicine on Medicare.  The fact you can stay on your parents’ plan until you turn 26. And much, much more. And it’s okay if you’re not a fan of the Affordable Care Act – you can take advantage of these things anyway.

If you don’t have insurance, beginning on October 1st, private plans will actually compete for your business. You can comparison shop in an online marketplace, just like you would for cell phone plans or plane tickets. You may be eligible for new tax credits to help you afford the plan that’s right for you. And if you’re in the up to half of all Americans who’ve been sick or have a preexisting condition, this law means that beginning January 1st, insurance companies have to cover you – and they can’t use your medical history to charge you more than anybody else.

You can find out more about the law, and how to sign up to buy your own coverage right now at HealthCare.gov. Tell your friends and neighbors without insurance about it, too. And tell your kids that there’s a new, easy way to buy affordable plans specifically tailored to young people.

Many Members of Congress, in both parties, are working hard to inform their constituents about these benefits, protections, and affordable plans. But there’s also a group of Republicans in Congress working hard to confuse people, and making empty promises that they’ll either shut down the health care law, or, if they don’t get their way, they’ll shut down the government.

Think about that. They’re actually having a debate between hurting Americans who will no longer be denied affordable care just because they’ve been sick – and harming the economy and millions of Americans in the process. And many Republicans are more concerned with how badly this debate will hurt them politically than they are with how badly it’ll hurt the country.

A lot of Republicans seem to believe that if they can gum up the works and make this law fail, they’ll somehow be sticking it to me. But they’d just be sticking it to you.

Some even say that if you call their office with questions about the law, they’ll refuse to help. Call me old-fashioned – but that’s lousy constituent service. And it’s not what you deserve.

Your health insurance isn’t something to play politics with. Our economy isn’t something to play politics with. This isn’t a game. This is about the economic security of millions of families.

See, in the states where governors and legislatures and insurers are working together to implement this law properly – states like California, New York, Colorado and Maryland – competition and consumer choice are actually making insurance affordable.

So I’m going to keep doing everything in my power to make sure this law works as it’s supposed to.  Because in the United States of America, health insurance isn’t a privilege – it is your right.  And we’re going to keep it that way.

Thanks.  And have a great weekend.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Somehow be sticking it to me...sticking it to you (0+ / 0-)

    A lot of Republicans seem to believe that if they can gum up the works and make this law fail, they’ll somehow be sticking it to me. But they’d just be sticking it to you.

    We understand, the republicans are not sticking it to us at all.

    You did, when you failed to deliver Single Payer.

  •  Wish I could rec this diary 100 times (9+ / 0-)

    but I'm on an iPad and the Recommend button doesn't show up, so I can't Rec even once.  I can Tip on an iPad,  and of course with front page writers there is no Tip Jar.  Let It Be Known: I highly recommend this diary!

    Anybody know a work around for an iPad for making the Rec button show up?

    We are all in this together.

    by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:14:19 AM PDT

  •  That's something, except how many actually listen (5+ / 0-)

    to these Saturday radio addresses?  How about a press conference or a prime time TV address?  But then, that would mean Obama would really be fighting for something and we've learned that's too much to expect.

    The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

    by accumbens on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:21:25 AM PDT

    •  Should be prime time if he's serious. (5+ / 0-)

      Come to think of it, should have started a year ago.  It's not like the Republicans weren't telegraphing this.

      •  Maybe, I'm misremembering, but it seems to me (0+ / 0-)

        Reagan did lots of prime time address to push his agenda.  And people used to laugh at his charts, but they got the message across.  Besides his inspirational speeches (which campaign speeches are), Obama is a largely terrible communicator and it has hurt him and this country.  Combine that with his inability or refusal to fight for much of anything and you've got the leaderless government we have now.

        The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

        by accumbens on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:39:25 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  here's last week's press conference (7+ / 0-)

      by the President, widely covered:

      During a White House press conference, Obama at times appeared incredulous as he described the years-long effort by Republicans to nix the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, which has been law since March 2010. House Republicans have voted to repeal the law 40 times.

      "The one unifying principle in the Republican Party at the moment is making sure that 30 million people don't have health care," Obama said, referring to the number of people who will have health insurance as a direct result of the law. "Why is it that my friends in the other party have made the idea of preventing these people from getting health care their holy grail? Their number one priority?"

      The president chuckled as he said Republicans at least used to say they would replace the law with a better health care proposal. Not anymore, he said.

      "There's not even a pretense now that they're going to replace it with something better," Obama said. "The notion is simply that those 30 million people, or the 150 million who are benefiting from other aspects of affordable care, will be better off without it. That's their assertion. Not backed by fact. Not backed by any evidence. It's just become an ideological fixation."

      "It ain't right, Atticus," said Jem. "No, son, it ain't right." --Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

      by SottoVoce on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:45:35 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, he mentioned it during that one because he (0+ / 0-)

        got a question on it.  I should have said a dedicated press conference. His presser last week was focused on the NSA scandal.  He took questions about other things.  This part is equivalent to the Saturday address where it gets little attention.

        I'm talking about doing one like he did for the NSA business.  He lets it be known in advance what the presser is about (i.e., implementation of the ACA), he starts it with a statement about Republican obstruction and misinformation and takes questions on it or even only on it.  

        But maybe he only does dedicated pressers when he has to defend himself, not when he needs to go on the offensive?

        The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

        by accumbens on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:14:16 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  it would be a fool's errand for him to tailor (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          bewareofme, jedennis, htowngenie, arabian

          his words and actions in an attempt to satisfy those who are determined not to be satisfied.

          Why does he stay in DC, when he should take his message out to the people in the country?  So, he goes on the road to take his message to the people.  Okay, BUT why does he say Congress is the problem, when he should say Republicans in Congress?  So he says Republicans.  Okay, BUT why does he use his Saturday address, which no one hears, when it should be a press conference?  So he holds a press conference.  Okay, BUT why does he say it in a press conference focused on the NSA, when it should be a dedicated press conference?
          Of course we should criticize bad policy or wrongheaded words by the President and his Administration.  But good policy and appropriate words should not just be another occasion to prove, once again, that it will never be enough to satisfy those whose minds are made up, on the right or the left.

          "It ain't right, Atticus," said Jem. "No, son, it ain't right." --Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

          by SottoVoce on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:43:29 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  It's about educating people. It's not about the (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            greenbell

            Repub base - it's about the fact that what the Repubs and their third party backers are saying makes news and gets disseminated with little or no pushback except for a radio address nobody hears or one question at a press conference held on a different subject.  

            If the Repubs are on full bore to misdirect people then it is a failure of leadership not to at least do what you can to correct the misinformation.  Sorry, but there is no excuse for letting this go essentially unopposed.  Look how good it worked during the summer of 2009 when the Tea Party made hash of Obama's health insurance baby while he was AWOL.  He is about as passive a President as we've seen at least since the 1960s when I started paying attention and probably a lot earlier than that.

            The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

            by accumbens on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 09:10:42 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Sorry - "It's NOT about the Repub base" (0+ / 0-)

              The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

              by accumbens on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 09:11:24 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  I started paying attentionin the 60s, too, (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              htowngenie, michelewln, arabian

              and I have never before seen such a shockingly delinquent Congress;  I have never before seen a shadow government controlled by corporations like ALEC, operating with impunity to tear apart the fabric of our country; I have never before seen the public airwaves so completely taken over by just a handful of giant conglomerates with a unified, pro-corporate message; I have never before seen elections completely determined by the kind of money now necessary; I have never before seen lobbyists so overrun our Congress; I have never before seen billionaires funding chairs in colleges nationwide to promote dishonest scientific theories; I have never before seen political organizations funding fake grassroots tours to disrupt, shout down and misinform the public deliberately; I have never before seen such a baldly political Supreme Court operating in bad faith to aid one party's electoral functions at all costs, and I have never (at least since the late 60s) seen racism fed and watered daily by one political party to the degree that every single political policy, no matter how harmful or poisonous to ordinary Americans' lives is accepted gleefully by its very victims as a way to poke the black guy in the White House in the eye.  

              To lay every single failure to overcome such a powerful opposition force solely on the President's shoulders, sneering  at  his positive actions because they do not go far enough, harms both our cause and the cause of all Americans.  If his message isn't able to outshout that of such an organized opposition, perhaps WE should be organized to help spread the word, rather than devoting our energies mocking ANY efforts--even positive ones--by those ostensibly on our side.

              "It ain't right, Atticus," said Jem. "No, son, it ain't right." --Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

              by SottoVoce on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 09:42:11 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  No, it's not all his fault or his responsibility, (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                SottoVoce, greenbell, snoopydawg

                but he is President after all and he has refused to use the power that is tied to that office to fight the forces against him.  And I don't mean fight and win - winning is not under his control - but just fight.  His inability or refusal to use the bully pulpit is breathtaking.  We can't call a press conference or create a prime time TV address to the nation, but he can.  Indeed, with all that is against him, his failure of leadership even more acute and obvious.  He's more like a non-directive Rogerian therapist than a President.

                The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

                by accumbens on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 09:52:58 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  I'll accept that he doesn't fight (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  htowngenie

                  in a public enough way; he doesn't "welcome their hatred" as he should, especially since he's no longer up for re-election.
                  But the next time he makes an important, highly public and controversial speech on an important topic (as he did,  for example, after the Zimmerman verdict), remember that you asked for him to use the bully pulpit when you read--or write--"it's just pretty words" or "so, he makes a good speech, so what?"

                  "It ain't right, Atticus," said Jem. "No, son, it ain't right." --Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

                  by SottoVoce on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 10:00:28 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  His statements regarding race have been superb (0+ / 0-)

                    in my opinion.  And the same has been true for some other human rights issues.  But these are not made within the  confrontation context of the sort you have with legislation or policy.  He avoids confrontation and, while to some that makes him the only adult in the room, it makes him a passive bystander and wastes the power of his presidency.  

                    The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

                    by accumbens on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 10:23:24 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

              •  You tell 'em! (0+ / 0-)

                Boy that was great.  Can I borrow it in my arguments?

                Thanks!  Thanks! Thanks!

                We are all in this together.

                by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 10:20:08 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

  •  My 30 yr old son will have healthcare insurance (14+ / 0-)

    next year for the 1st time since he was 26, due to this.  

  •  What about Obama's obstruction of implementation (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cactusgal, stewarjt

    I'm more worried about him bending the law to let corporations off the hook.  

    And instead of the hissy fit fights, why doesn't the administration have an organized coherent communications plan to inform people what they need to do in October? October is not far away. No one understands the law.  What kind of chaos is there going to be when these exchanges try to come up in October and the public doesn't understand the first thing about what they need to do?

    I've been trying to get answers from my insurance company because the ACA might help me but I don't know.  They don't know!  No one knows.  No one really seems to get how the transition is going to take place from old plans to new plans.  

    •  What state are you in? (0+ / 0-)

      Sometimes civic responsibility requires some effort on your part.  Your plea for help sounds disingenuous to me.  

      We are all in this together.

      by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:42:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well you're on message there (0+ / 0-)
        Sometimes civic responsibility requires some effort on your part.
        I expect that's the recorded message people will get in October when they find out they have to navigate a new system they know nothing about.  
        •  I'm volunteering in (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          closerange

          Texas to be a navigator to help people.  And before I hear it a hundred times, yes I know it's a paid position.  But I don't need the money and somebody else probably needs a paid job.  

          What are you doing to help 30 million Americans get access to the healthcare they need?

          We are all in this together.

          by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 09:41:09 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  OK, I'll help Texans navigate healthcare (0+ / 0-)

            Get out your map or smartphone and find directions to I-35.  It's somewhere in your state.  Go there.  Take the exit pointing north.  Keep going until you see the sign that says, "Welcome to Minnesota".  

            •  I tend to be a local activist (0+ / 0-)

              but I once went there to help a friend recover from rotator cuff surgery.  Does that count?

              And btw, I did't get on 35 to do it.  I went up US 59 to get out of Texas.  It's big state.

              We are all in this together.

              by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 10:47:49 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  The Surgeon General should be all over this. I (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      greenbell, cocinero

      remember C.Everitt Coop's mug all over the teevee during his tenure.  Few of us, even Administration junkies, could even identify the Surgeon General.  The teevee docs, Gupta, Oz, Sneiderman, et. al., should be all over this too.

      Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

      by judyms9 on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:13:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Problem is, he's not bending the law (0+ / 0-)

      The AHCA allowed him to exempt some corporations for short periods of time.... however, short period of time wasn't outlined properly, so that could be for 10 years!

  •  "A GROUP of Republicans?" (7+ / 0-)

    Mr. President, it's the House GOP caucus as a group that will bear any burden and pay any price to kill the ACA.  I have no clue as to what you mean here:

    Many Members of Congress, in both parties, are working hard to inform their constituents about these benefits, protections, and affordable plans
    Who, exactly, are these House GOP members who are helping to implement the ACA?  Are there enough of them to fill up a minivan?  Why persist in this delusion that there are plenty of well-meaning Hill Goopers who will see reason and compromise if you continue to use your powers of persuasion on them?

    Despite the fact that so many of its key elements come from Romney's MA bill and from the Heritage Foundation, the GOP is unalterably opposed to the ACA as a party.  Accept that core fact that has been painfully obvious for 3-4 years now, and act accordingly.

    Some men see things as they are and ask why. I dream of things that never were and ask why not?

    by RFK Lives on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:32:25 AM PDT

    •  Crickets here (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      createpeace, judyms9, jedennis
      Many Members of Congress, in both parties, are working hard to inform their constituents about these benefits, protections, and affordable plans
      They are? I mean I'm in  true blue MN and our state is entirely controlled by Democrats and

      CRICKETS!

      The THEORY of how this is going to work is out on a web site but how individual people will deal with transitioning on to this system is just opaque.  

      How on earth are they going to handle fielding questions on this in October and are the people deployed to answer the questions going to know enough to help people through something this important to their families?  

      They need to do a lot more informing and a lot less blaming because the only way this is going to succeed is if people understand it, are able to use it, and then come to support it.

      •  oh come on now (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        htowngenie

        I also live in MN and the Strib has an entire website devoted to the health care law.  And they did a story a couple of weeks back about the call center and the "navigators" that will field questions and their training.

        •  Well thank heaven for the newspaper (0+ / 0-)

          Still, most of the information is very general.  I'm worried about how they're going to handle the specifics.  The "navigators" should help but will they have enough healthcare and the insurance experience to understand the questions they get?  

          I got worried myself because I've got to make a plan change in October and I can't find out what plans are going to be available then and how they'll transition in January.   Healthcare presents a lot of very specific situations which I fear the "navigators" are going to discover on about day 1!

          •  I hold a state insurance license in (0+ / 0-)

            Texas, bachelors degree (scl) certified treasury professional and spent 30 years in corporate banking and I'm going to be a navigator.  I know that's not the norm but whoever I help will be making an informed decision.  Anybody else on Dkos with customer service skills should contact their state exchange and volunteer.

            It doesn't sound like you actually visited your state exchange website to compare yet.  It's VERY basic information, no typical insurance jargon or small  print.  Consumers will answer a few questions and then compare 4 levels of coverage in simple terms.  Most people will be able to do it.  For those needing help, a navigator will guide them through it by mail, phone, or online.

            We are all in this together.

            by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 10:29:28 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Oh, yeah, I get that (0+ / 0-)

              but what those simple questions don't tell you is how you transition from the providers, clinics, and hospitals you have now or whether the drugs you are on now will be exactly the same, or whether there are other options outside of the exchanges that might actually meet your specific healthcare needs more precisely or whatever.  

              The exchanges aren't up yet.   When you call your current insurance carrier they don't even know what is going to happen in October with the plan you have now and how it is going to relate to the plan that's in the exchange.  

              Are we going to have the SAME network of providers or not?  Who knows?  It does matter to people if they can keep their same doctors and stuff and all that stuff about bronze, silver, gold doesn't really tell you that.  

              •  Questions for you personally (0+ / 0-)

                I realize this is a public forum and we are talking about your personal medical care, so I won't ask anything personal here.  But, basically, it sounds like you have private insurance now that you are settled with and doctors, hospitals, drugs, etc that you are happy with.  There is nothing in ACA that compels you to make a change.  You can continue doing what you are doing.  

                If you are unhappy with what you pay to your insurance company for the insurance you have, you have to take it up with them.  I hope you are one of the people who received a rebate last year from private insurance companies that were required by ACA to rebate customers if they spent less than 80% of their premium income on actual health insurance expenses.  Some private insurers had to give rebates because they were spending more than 20% of their premium income on things like executive compensation, advertisements, and joining ALEC.  Did you get a check?

                Because of fairer competition in the market, many private insurance companies will no longer offer private plans that are considerably more expensive than what will become available after ACA is implemented.  If your insurance agent doesn't know whether or not your particular plan will continue to be offered, my guess is that it might not, because it will no longer be profitable to them.  Many insurance companies are lowering their premiums on existing private insurance right now because they realize their customers will now have a real choice.  But again, that is an issue between you and your insurance company.  

                When the exchange opens in your state, you can compare the offerings with what you currently have now and see if saving money on premiums is worth getting insurance through the exchange.  Hopefully one of the insurance companies that accept your primary care doctor will be on the list, in fact, your insurance company may be one of those to offer policies on the exchange.  If so, sing hallelujah.  If not, are you willing to switch doctors and hospitals to get cheaper insurance?  That's the only real question you need to answer.

                We are all in this together.

                by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 11:48:57 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Ok, so you are making my point (0+ / 0-)
                  Because of fairer competition in the market, many private insurance companies will no longer offer private plans that are considerably more expensive than what will become available after ACA is implemented.  If your insurance agent doesn't know whether or not your particular plan will continue to be offered, my guess is that it might not, because it will no longer be profitable to them.
                  My point is that this isn't necessarily a slam dunk decision for people.  Unlike Texas, most people in Minnesota are already insured so it won't be going from nothing, it will be coming from something to something else and even if this helps most people it may not be good for people who have a specific plan that happens to fit their specific situation so it's going to be confusing for many and it doesn't have to be confusing for all that many to overwhelm the "navigators".  

                  I'm just saying it's long past time for hissy fits with Republicans.  The success of the implementation is what matters at this point because you can be sure Republicans will be collecting stories on the problems people encounter.

                  •  I myself have excellent insurance (0+ / 0-)

                    through my husband's 30 year employment, so I have no personal investment in whether or not ACA is implemented.  I DO have a civic responsibility to others to try an make the implementation a success and that is why I am volunteering.  If 30 million others can benefit from ACA and gain access to healthcare they didn't have before and others who are already insured might get cheaper access, I am all in.  However, I realize that there are going to be some stories out there like yours that might be compelling and might be unfortunate.  But "might be" is a lot different than IS.  The fact is the early reports out of exchanges that are up and running are not reporting any unfortunate stories like yours.  I sincerely wish you luck with your insurance company and hope things will work out for you.

                    We are all in this together.

                    by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 02:28:27 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

              •  No need to change all that (0+ / 0-)

                Even if you change insurance plans to one of the new ones on the exchanges, you just keep going to the same doctors, hospital, etc.   There is no "transition" except that you will be making your claims to a new carrier.    It's the same thing as though you decided to change plans under an "open season" at your current employer.  

                As far as "network" doctors go, you don't' have to use the doctors in a plan's network.  It's just that you will pay somewhat more if you go out of network, maybe 70 percent reimbursement instead of 90.  That's a factor you have to weigh in deciding whether it makes economic sense to switch from your current plan.    

          •  the insurers are voluntarily releasing their plans (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            htowngenie

            on 9/6.  

            In that link I provided is a July 8 article about how the exchange website will operate

            ...take data from hundreds of thousands of individual Minnesotans, verify it with a half dozen state and federal systems, overlay it with information provided by health plans and spit out a simple set of choices the average citizen can understand.

            Underneath the hood, more than 40 software programs are running to keep the data private, and verify such things as household income, citizenship and other workplace insurance offerings.

            When the switch gets flipped, MNsure will debut as a single website that will calculate how much premiums will be and whether a person qualifies for a public program or a subsidy to make premiums more affordable. The site must be able to collect money to pay the insurance companies, and tie into a call center or online chat room to answer questions.

            I think they will be ready to answer your questions.
            •  Thanks, I missed the 9/6 thing (0+ / 0-)

              That's helpful to know.

              Since most of us in Minnesota do already have insurance, the questions aren't just about getting something you don't have but understanding how what you are going to get is different.  Since we have always been one of the best states when it comes to healthcare, I'm not assuming that the plans offered in the exchanges are going to be better.  

              •  In MN, we don't have junk insurance plans (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                htowngenie, greenbell

                so they likely won't be better but they won't be worse.  The advantage of the exchange will be the subsidy and the Medicaid expansion.  

                Insurers are still going to offer plans outside of the exchange.  If people think they can get a better deal that way then they should go for it.

      •  California and Florida (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mr MadAsHell, closerange, Lerianis

        already have exchanges up and running with great success getting subsidized insurance for people who qualify and cheaper premiums for those who don't.  Republicans without affordable healthcare are signing up and mentioning it, too.  (See my diary of this past week Red States Embracing ACA which was picked up by Dkos for it's weekly synopsis of diaries and re-tweeted a bunch).  If your state hasn't told you about the healthcare market yet, it's a state problem.  Contact your state rep.  

        The PPACA, all 2500+ pages, is available for your reading pleasure on the White House website.  If you can't or won't read it yourself, the website has FAQ's.  I have a copy of it saved to my desktop.  

        I'm sick of progressives here at DKos bashing ACA.  If you have a better plan, other than Universal Healthcare for All (which I totally support and want), then put it out there.  But in my opinion your argument is on the level with the GOP - you don't have an alternate plan and you want to derail ACA because it's not what you want.  I will tell you what I tell Republicans - it is signed law, if you don't like it, call your US Rep or US Senator to introduce something different.  

        And, I dunno, I kind of thought DKos readers were smarter than the average bear, and could figure out the pros and cons themselves without the frigging President having to explain it to them.  Republican low information voters not liking or understanding ACA I can understand because, well, they are low information.  But maybe I over-estimated the crowd here.

         

        We are all in this together.

        by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 10:00:46 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Exactly, while ACA is not perfect (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          htowngenie

          It is a lot better than what we had before now!

          Yes, single payer would be the best situation or a nationalized option at the very least (buy into Medicare at cost), however with the current Rethuglican rejects in office.... you aren't going to get that past Congress.

  •  I am so tired of the web addresses and the web (6+ / 0-)

    announcements.  Time to take it to the people.  

    Get on a bus and ride from town to town and say directly to the people "they think they're sticking it to me, but they're really sticking it to you, and here's exactly how."  

    Or get on teevee once a week for 10 straight weeks and say the same damned thing over and over and EXPLAIN in clear and simple terms what Obamacare does, and how the Republicans' obstruction is hurting the American people.

    That's one more thing to add to my long list of small problems. --my son, age 10

    by concernedamerican on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:35:21 AM PDT

    •  Has he ever EXPLAINED it (4+ / 0-)

      I mean they ought to be buying time to do infomercials. Not every American is an internet guru.  Not every American is going to seek out a web site to learn about this on their own initiative particularly when some of the people this is meant to help are low information and not particularly well educated.  

      •  He doesn't need to explain it, the websites do (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        arabian

        And do it in the simplest terms that I have ever seen on a government website.

        To say that you don't want to go online and want him to sit down with you personally and explain it is being arrogant in the extreme.

        Obama DOES NOT HAVE THE TIME TO DO THAT! No elected official does in the real world.

        •  The point is not that the websites do it clearly. (0+ / 0-)

          It is that not enough people-- nowhere near enough people-- even know that the information is on the websites.

          It's the whole "if a tree falls in a forest and there's no one to hear it" problem.

          What the President must do is get out of the forest and go door to door (metaphorically) and tell as many people as possible in as many ways as possible that the damned tree fell.

          That's one more thing to add to my long list of small problems. --my son, age 10

          by concernedamerican on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 09:18:57 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Agree (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jedennis, micsimov, concernedamerican

      Why this administration always waits until Republicans have completely defined an issue before stepping in is beyond me.  The positives for every day uninsured or under-insured people should have been trumpeted since the laws inception.

      •  And while marketing is still needed (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        concernedamerican

        He's entering the implementation phase now.  

        I'm reminded of the old powerpoint slide showing an incomprehensibly complex flowchart with a bubble at the bottom labeled "A miracle occurs".  

        His administration has to pull off the miracle.  Blaming Republicans won't do that.

  •  That was the Obama from debate 2 and 3. (8+ / 0-)

    Great stuff....and can folks stop whining about not having single payer?  It had no chance of passing. This law is working to save money and save lives.  Judge it on what it is supposed to do not on based on an unattainable wish list. If you want single payer go advocate for it at the grassroots.

    Alternative rock with something to say. Check out Global Shakedown's latest album, "A Time to Recognize": Available on iTunes/Amazon, or stream it at http://www.myspace.com/globalshakedown.

    by khyber900 on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:43:43 AM PDT

    •  He Didn't Even Try. He Didn't Fight For Single (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      greenbell

      Payer.  Just compare his inaction with President Bush's sales job for the Iraq war.  Very few people wanted that war and what do you know.

      An acquaintance of mine who works for United Health Care bragged to me not too long ago, "We wrote that ACA bill."

      If I was a communist, rich men would fear me...And the opposite applies. The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles.

      by stewarjt on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:53:40 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Among the 7 Dems (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        khyber900, TexasTom

        who campaigned for president in Iowa in 2007 prior to the Iowa caucuses and start of the 2008 campaign, there were zero who were advocating a single payer system. Obamacare was based on the proposals from Hillary and John Edwards. Single payer was never a serious option when the ACA was written in 2009.

        •  Two Things (0+ / 0-)

          First, zero candidates advocating single payer doesn't affect my point at all that President Obama didn't fight for it.  Democratic presidential candidates supporting or not supporting a policy doesn't make or break options.  They exist regardless.

          Second, let's cogitate on the wildly unpopular policies and personnel President Obama fights for.

          1.  He repeatedly and continually puts Social Security benefit cuts on the table.

          2.  He appears ready to nominate Larry Summers for Fed chair in spite of working class, i.e., the Democratic party's base vigorous opposition.

          Social Security benefit cuts aren't any where near as popular as single payer was/is.  

          What gives?

          If I was a communist, rich men would fear me...And the opposite applies. The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles.

          by stewarjt on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 09:35:31 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Those are other issues. Social security (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            htowngenie

            and the Fed chairman don't have anything to do with the ACA, which is turning out to be a bigger success more quickly than most had imagined.  I am not even an intended beneficiary of the ACA but my family is saving about $4000 on premiums thanks to the market pressure that Obamacare has put on the market for employer based health care.  That's money in my family's pocket that I can put to better, more productive uses that will have a bigger benefit to the economy.  

            Alternative rock with something to say. Check out Global Shakedown's latest album, "A Time to Recognize": Available on iTunes/Amazon, or stream it at http://www.myspace.com/globalshakedown.

            by khyber900 on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 10:20:41 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  You Have The Ability (0+ / 0-)

              To ignore what I write and continue on your own without directly responding..

              Just think how big a success single payer would have been if a political leader, a president maybe fought for it.

              If I was a communist, rich men would fear me...And the opposite applies. The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles.

              by stewarjt on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 01:01:42 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  off topic a bit, no? (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            arabian

            let's debate ACA here - that's what the diary is about.  What you are debating has been hashed out in a gazillion diaries droning on for weeks here at DKos.  Post your own diary if you have things you want to add to those topics.

            We are all in this together.

            by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 10:34:57 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  This is what happens... (0+ / 0-)

    ...when one passes extremely controversial legislation on a party-line vote. No particular surprises here.

    (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
    Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

    by Sparhawk on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:44:50 AM PDT

    •  Under any other president there would have been (5+ / 0-)

      some repub votes, but once Obama was elected they became a party with a single mission, which they failed at, of course, but now they are like old, washed up boxers who don't know what to do with themselves so they just keep watching replays of their former bouts.

      Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

      by judyms9 on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:18:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Considering that the ACA... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      htowngenie, Lerianis

      ...makes heavy use of ideas that originated in conservative think tanks -- ideas that were supported by Republicans right up to the time that Obama became president -- I think we can lay the blame for the party-line vote exactly where it belongs, which is with the Republicans.

      There is not a single thing that Obama could have done to get Republican support for any sort of health care reform...other than, perhaps, resigning.

      Political Compass: -6.75, -3.08

      by TexasTom on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 11:44:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Tipped and recd.Thank you. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bewareofme, cocinero, htowngenie

    "Corruptio Optimi Pessima" (Corruption of the best is the worst)

    by zenox on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:01:57 AM PDT

  •  Video is autoplaying... (0+ / 0-)

    Not sure if it's you or me, but if it's you can you please fix?

    ~Doc~

    -7.88 -8,77 Just a wine sipping, brie eating, $6 coffee drinking, Prius driving, over educated, liberal, white, activist, male New Englander for Barack Obama.

    by EquationDoc on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:02:42 AM PDT

  •  He had a Democrat controlled Congress when he... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    stewarjt

    ...moved into the White House.  All he had to do was open Medicare to everybody and keep it a single payer system.

    He caved in to Republican obstructionism, gave that opportunity away --- just like we all said.

    Now he's playing catch up -- just like we all said.

    The Democrats put Obama in this position by not doing the right thing.  When will we ever learn.  The Democrats are the real problem.  We need stronger, more rational people in the Democratic party.

    •  Dennis Kucinich was the one calling for Medicare (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cocinero, htowngenie, TexasTom

      for all.  Now he's out of office and riffs over in the cesspool called Fox.

      Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

      by judyms9 on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:20:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  He did not have a Democratic controlled Senate (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      htowngenie, arabian

      There have not been 60 Democrats in the Senate since the 1970s. Al Franken did not become a senator until July, thanks to the MN recount. The there was Lieberman plus conservadems like Ben Nelson.

    •  I hate football analogies (0+ / 0-)

      but it's apt here.  

      Your opposing team is 2 points ahead playing dirty to get there.

      If your best quarterback f's up on 3 and 20, are you going for a field goal instead of a touchdown?

      Or will you say you don't want the field goal, you want your best quarterback kicked off the field?

      We are all in this together.

      by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 10:11:55 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Not really... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      htowngenie, arabian

      The president did not have a filbuster proof majority in the Senate during his first six months in office, and even once he did, it was reliant on hard core single payer opponents such as Lieberman.  

      And even the House majority was far from a given, as a fair number of the House Democrats in 2009 were blue dogs from districts that went Republican at the presidential level.  These were not Democrats who would have supported single payer, and they were not from districts that would support a congressman who supported single payer.

      The combination of demographics and gerrymanders makes it very hard to get a solid progressive majority in the House.

      Political Compass: -6.75, -3.08

      by TexasTom on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 11:48:55 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  good! Spine, Mr. President, I like SPINE!!! (0+ / 0-)
  •  The REAL Reason the Republicans want to Repeal (5+ / 0-)

    Remember who the Republicans are in bed with, and have been from the time when the ACA was first proposed.

    The Private Health Insurance Industry.

    While private providers have accepted the ACA based on the flood of new "healthier" customers they are slated to receive, they don't like allowing children to remain on their parents policies until 26 (because they would much prefer forcing them to choose between higher cost individual coverage or none at all), they don't like not being able to deny people coverage for a pre-existing condition, they don't like caps on out-of pocket expenses, and they really don't like having their profits limited by requiring 80% of what they take in to go to actual payment of health care expenses (and if it doesn't they have to send you a rebate check).

    Given their druthers, private providers would much rather give up the new customers if they can go back to the "Bad Old Days" of denying coverage (private death panels) and unlimited profits (i.e., total abolishment of the ACA).  That's the REAL reason Republicans continue to push for total repeal, because its what their friends in the private insurance industry dream about, and would reward handsomely in campaign contributions.  That's why they are not just out to repeal the individual mandate their base hates so much, because its the only thing their private insurance friends like about the ACA.  And that's why they are lying through their teeth when they say that they are not looking to repeal the things people like about the ACA such as denial of coverage for pre-existing conditions since such things are what their private insurer friends hate the most.

    Follow the money if you want to find out what's REALLY motivating Republicans ACA hissy-fit.

    "Some men see things as they are and ask, 'Why?' I dream of things that never were and ask, 'Why not?"

    by Doctor Who on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:25:52 AM PDT

  •  using ACA calculator my premium goes up $1K (0+ / 0-)

    If this is true, obviously I'm not a fan of ACA. It was supposed to make my premiums lower.

    If this plan is riding on the back's of middle-class singles taking the bulk hit of financing, I'm out. I may take the penalty and opt out.

    I'm not seeing enough information to properly compare my current self-paid plan with the ACA offerings. Perhaps my initial calculations are off -- hope so.

    Audit the Pentagon: 25% of funding -- $2.3 Trillion dollars -- unaccounted for.

    by roonie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:42:02 AM PDT

    •  While it is true (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cocinero

      that some will see their premiums rise, a larger number will get subsidies to keep the policy affordable. Are you eligible for a subsidy? Did you checkout www.healthcare.gov?

      Your current provider may even participate in you local exchange with a better policy. Lastly, did you receive a rebate this year and last?

    •  Make sure you're not comparing apples & oranges (0+ / 0-)

      What are the differences in benefits?

      I'm not seeing enough information to properly compare my current self-paid plan with the ACA offerings.
    •  What state are you in? (0+ / 0-)

      We are all in this together.

      by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 10:14:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  in NC (0+ / 0-)

      No subsidy due to income -- which is NOT 6 figure or even high 5 figure.

      The single status does not help.

      Rebate? No. Haven't even heard of it.

      I currently pay $460/month. I'm in my 50's.

      All that drama and effort of the ACA for my premiums to go UP?  Not happy. Again,, I'll wait and see and look deeper as the fall progresses, but this is NOT reform from my viewpoint-- it's a form of more taxes, again, hitting the solidly middle-class.

      Audit the Pentagon: 25% of funding -- $2.3 Trillion dollars -- unaccounted for.

      by roonie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 12:25:44 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Where'd they all go? (0+ / 0-)

    I guess the shills have gone to fight battles elsewhere here at Dkos.  Whew, I didn't think they'd ever leave.

    We are all in this together.

    by htowngenie on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 10:39:42 AM PDT

  •  Hard to believe the GOP thinks it makes sense (0+ / 0-)

    This battle is stupid, Republicans. Give it up.

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